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Harvest Section D
Flyers | 2017-08-18 17:54:58
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    FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 • THE NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST D1 Is technology a boon for agriculture? Cam Dahl, President of Cereals Canada It is hard to believe, but the genetic engineering technology that gave us herbicide resistant canola, corn and soybeans is yesterday’s science. The recombinant DNA techniques that gave us these new farming options have benefited agriculture – through increased yield, reduced input costs and reduction of tillage and summer fallow. The technology has also helped improve Canadian agriculture’s sustainability picture, by reducing fuel use, improving soil organic matter and decreasing erosion. But not everyone in society sees these benefits and the resistance to “GMO” in by some consumers in the market place continues. So what about the next step in technology? I am a complete science nerd, so I get excited when I read about new gene editing techniques like CRISPR-Cas9. But not everyone shares this excitement. Should we embrace the advances in genetic science or stick to the older traditional methods of plant breeding? For me, the answer is an enthusiastic “yes, but”. First to the “yes” part of the answer. Unlike rDNA methods, the new gene editing techniques do not introduce DNA from outside of the plant. A new wheat variety 2013 CHEV SILVERADO LT THUNDER 4X4 58,000 KM $34,900 2014 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2.0T SPORT AWD 53,000 KM $26,900 2012 YAMAHA GAS GOLF CARTS $5,195 GOLF CART ACCESSORIES LIGHT KITS WINDSHIELDS MAG TIRES & WHEELS BALL WASHERS derived using the emerging technology will still be 100% wheat DNA. Gene editing will rapidly speed the plant breeding process. It can take ten to fifteen years (or more) to breed a new variety using traditional plant breeding methods. With the new processes, this will be cut back to five to seven years or even less. Gene editing technology will allow scientists to deliver drought tolerant crops, salt tolerant crops, fusarium resistant crops, resistance to rust, specific nutritional profiles and a likely few beneficial traits that we have not even contemplated. The technology is precise, only changing what needs to be adjusted leaving the beneficial characteristics in place. And the new breeding programs will deliver these traits in ½ the time, or less, of regular plant breeding. Being on the cutting edge of technology is a competitive advantage for Canadian farmers. We can’t afford to turn our back on advancements in science. The new technology will help agriculture adapt to a changing climate. This is how we will deliver new productive seeds to small landholders around the world who are looking for a path out of poverty. This is how we will feed a growing population. The world really is on the edge of another green Melfort, Sask 306-752-9403 2012 GMC 1500 SIERRA KODIAK 4X4 99,000 KM $26,900 2009 TOYOTA CAMRY SE SPORT 136,000 KM $10,500 STRONG HAUL 14 FT ALUMINIUM, REAR RAMP & ALUM. WHEELS $4,395 TRAILER SERVICE HITCHES WIRING, BRAKES BEARINGS 2013 FORD F150 XLT 4X4 90,000 KM $25,900 2008 CADILLAC DTS 139,000 KM $9,995 DOUBLE A 24 FT HYDRAULIC TILT, 14,000 LBS $11,995 TOWING SUPPLIES DIRT SKIRTS COUPLER LOCKS ETRACK DRINGS See our inventory @ kencampbellsales.com 2008 GMC SIERRA 1500 SLE 4X4 218,000 KM $12,900 2008 GMC ACADIA SLT, AWD, 217,000 KM $9,995 CJAY 28 FT SLED/QUAD HAULER WHITE BOARD & E-TRACK $15,900 Financing available OAC for vehicles & trailers. Apply online at kencampbellsales.com revolution. How could one be anything but excited? Now we get to the “but” part of the answer. Many consumers are wary of new science and technology, especially when that science is applied to food. We can’t blaze the new technology trail and ignore the consuming public. We need to acknowledge the concerns and bring consumers on the path with us. Accomplishing this goal is just as important as delivering new traits and varieties. There are two tracks we as an industry need to take simultaneously. First, we need scientists and farmers to come out of the fields and labs to explain why the new technology is good for consumers and our planet. We know how the science will benefit agriculture, but how will the new techniques benefit someone in downtown Toronto with no connection to the farm? We need to deliver real answers to this question before the activists convince the public that we are putting Frankenstein’s monster onto grocery shelves. But our actions should not be confined to trying to convince the consumers. There is a regulatory element as well. And here the Government of Canada must be an active partner. Canada must lead the development of clear, science-based regulations that include the new gene editing techniques. Regulations based on fact and research, not fear, will facilitate the adoption of the new technology. Second, we need the Government of Canada to actively engage regulatory agencies in key markets to follow the Canadian example and implement a regulatory regime that allows rather than prevents the use of the new plant breeding techniques. This is work that needs to be accomplished before new varieties are planted. Working towards enabling regulations around the world should have a priority that is on par with negotiating the elimination of tariffs and restrictive quotas. The new technology is a potential boon, not just for farmers but for consumers and a hungry world. But agriculture has work to do with consumers and governments around the globe if the possibilities of the science are to be realized. For your continued support this Summer. Without you, our buyers & sellers, it would not be possible to have such a successful local business. Our next Major Equipment Auction is Mid-October in Tisdale. If you have equipment to sell - Call us TODAY! Have a great harvest. Be safe & take care out there! - Bruce, Deb, Don Luthi & Staff BOOK YOUR OCTOBER AUCTIONS TODAY FOR ADVERTISING. PLEASE CHECK WEBSITE DAILY FOR LISTINGS, PHOTOS & MORE AUCTIONS. We are now booking Spring & Summer 2018 Farm Auctions. CALL TODAY!

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    D2 HARVEST THE NORTHEAST SUN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 Watch for Swede Midge and its mysterious cousin By Joshua Santos Northeast Sun For brief years in the province, local farmers have been victim to Swede midge witnessing the insect devour their canola crops. Thankfully the bug only resided momentarily before moving on to a new area leaving producers feeling relieved. Their worry-free days however may be short lived as a new midge has made its way here. “Be observant for both Swede midge and this unknown midge. In a way, we’re almost lucky at the moment this new midge hasn’t caused near as much as Swede midge has caused,” said Agriculture and Agri- Food Canada Research Scientist, Boyd Mori. The accustomed Swede midge pest attacked all growth stages of a crop at rosette, bolting and flowering. “The females will lay eggs on all of the actively growing points of canola and when those eggs hatch, the larvae feed on the developing tissue 0 % FOR36MONTHS on allusedcombines & sprayers. 2016 CASE IH 9240 $499,000 620 Duals, Lux Cab, Lat Tilt w/Rocktrap, Accuguide, 50’ Folding Unload, Magnacut Chopper, HID Lights STK: 022638 COMBINES 2016 CASE IH 8240 520 Duals, Lat Tilt, Rocktrap, Ext Wear Rotor, Standard Chopper, Deluxe Cab,Leather Seat, Pro 700, Accuguide Ready STK: 022117 ........................$405,000 2015 CASE IH 9240 620 Duals, Lat Tilt, Rocktrap, Hyd Hopper Cover, 40’ Auger, Magnacut Chopper,HID Lights, Accuguide STK: 022527...........................................$499,000 2015 CASE IH 8240 620 Duals, Lat Tilt, Rocktrap, Hyd Hopper Cover, Long Auger, Magnacut Chopper,Lux Cab,HID Lights, Accuguide STK: 024326 ...........................$450,000 2014 CASE IH 8230 Duals, Lux Cab, HID Lights, Accuguide, 1,039 Sep Hrs STK: 022739...................................................................................................................$378,000 2014 CASE IH 8230 900 Singles, Lat Tilt, Deluxe Cab, GPS, Folding Auger, Pivot Spout, Hyd Fold Hopper Cover, 865 Engine & 640 Rotor Hrs STK: 025289 .........$335,000 2013 CASE IH 9230 620 Duals, Lux Cab, Lat Tilt, Rocktrap, Accuguide, Hyd Grain Tank Cover, Magnacut Chopper,HID Lights STK: 021990 ..................................$350,000 2012 CASE IH 7230 520 Duals, Lat Tilt, Ext Wear Rotor, Hyd Folding Cover, Std Chopper,HID Lights, Accuguide, Air Compressor STK:021503..........................$269,000 2012 CASE IH 8120 520 Duals, Deluxe Cab, Small Tube Rotor, 40Blade Chopper, Accuguide, w/ 3016 Pickup Header STK: 024384 ............................................$295,000 2009 CASE IH 7010 Outback GPS,Lateral Tilt, Shedded, 2,329 Engine Hours, 1,779 Rotor Hrs STK: 024384 ....................................................................................... $94,000 2009 CASE IH 7120 520 Duals, Lat Tilt, Accuguide, Pwr Mirrors, Std Cut Chopper, 3016 Header w/ SwathMaster Pickup STK: 205692B .......................................$189,000 2001 CASE IH 2388 Long Auger, Specialty Rotor, Chopper, SwathMaster Pickup STK: 021973 ...................................................................................................... $89,000 ... 2010 JOHNDEERE9770STSc/wJD615 Pickup,Deluxe Cab,Bullet Rotor,LongAuger, Fine Cut Chopper,2600 Monitor,Hopper Topper,Steer Ready STK:022038....$245,000 2013 JOHN DEERE 5680 c/w JD 615 Pickup, 520 Duals, 28L Rear Tires, Autosteer, Folding Hopper STK:024686 .............................................................................$355,000 2008 NEW HOLLAND CR9070 c/w 76C Pickup, 20.8/42 Duals, MAV Chopper, Colour Display, 7.3 MUnload Auger, Deluxe Cab STK:025314..........................$149,000 2003 NEW HOLLAND CR960 c/w NH 76C Pickup Header, Beacon, Service Lights, Yield &Moisture STK:023071............................................................................$102,900 2015CASEIH4440 $475,000$ 120’, AIM, Autoboom, Accuboom, Pro 700, Accuguide, Omnistar, Lux Cab, 620s &320s, 670 Hrs STK: 023153 *Finance Terms: Program issubject tocancellation atany time. Certain conditions may apply. O.A.C. and deposit distortions often swelling turning purple in colour. If it’s early in the rosette stage, it can prevent bolting and you’ll have complete yield lost,” Mori said. If decomposition occurred after those growth stages, it may still interfere with yield lost but it won’t contaminate it all. The new unknown midge, although similar in retrospect is completely different from Swede midge. “We finally figured out it was a different species last year. It was mistaken for Swede 2011 CASE IH 9120 $215,000 2016 P/UHeader, 900/60R32 & 600/65R28,Pro 600 Monitor, Rocktrap,SmTubeRotor,24’ Auger,MagnaCut Chopper STK: 022637 SPRAYERS LIMITED TIME ONLY! 2016 CASE IH 4440 120’, AIM Pro, Active Susp, Pro 700, Accuguide, Accuboom, Autoboom, Front Fill, Wide Fenders, Trelleborg 710s STK: 022565...........................$495,000 2014 CASE IH 4430 120’, Lux Cab,ActiveSusp, HID Lights,Autoboom,Accuboom,Viper Pro Monitor,AIM Pro, 380s &620s, RavenSmartrax Steering STK: 023711...........$380,000 2014 CASE IH 4530 FLOATER 70’, Lux Cab,Power Mirrors, HID Lights, Fenders, Double 6” Auger50CF, Viper 4Monitor,1,550 Hrs STK: 024242..........................................$320,000 2013 CASE IH 4430 100’, Deluxe Cab,AIM, Pro 700, 372 Receiver,2Sets Of Tires, HID Lights, Autoboom, Accuboom STK: 024786.................................................................$305,000 2013 CASE IH 3330 100’, 380 &650 Tires, ActiveSusp, Front Fill, AIM Command, HID Lights, Accuboom, Autoboom STK: 022510.................................................................$249,900 2009 CASE IH 4420 100’, AIM, 1,200 Gal, Norac Boom Height Control, Sectional Control, Autopilot,380s &520s, Ag Leader Monitor STK: 020576...........................$199,500 2013 JOHN DEERE 4940 120’, Boomtrac, Sect. Control, Autosteer, GPS Receiver and Monitor,2Sets of Tires, Halogen Lights, Chem Eductor STK: 025330......................$250,000 2010 JOHN DEERE 4830 100’, 1,000Gal Tank, Autosteer,Swath Pro, Autoboom, 2Sets Of Tires, Crop Dividers STK: 021520.............................................................................$215,000 2006 JOHN DEERE 4720 90’, S/S Tank, 2Sets Of Tires, Swath Pro, Green Star Steering, 2,600 Monitor,Crop Dividers STK: 025008.................................................................$139,000 2014 NEW HOLLAND SP240F 120’, 1,200 Gal SS Tank, Intelliview IVMonitor, Accuboom, AutoBoom, 2Sets of Tires STK: 024111 .......................................... $299,000 2013APACHE1220PLUS 100’,1,250 Gal,RavenControl &GPS,Accuboom,Autoboom, Rear Duals, 3Sets of Tips, 882 Hrs STK: 025158 ......................................................$190,000 1999 APACHE 790 90’, 440 RavenRateControl,Outback S3, UC4 Norac Boom Height Control STK: 021953.........................................................................................................$69,000 1998 ROGATOR 854 100’, 800 Gal SS Tank, Ez-Guide Autosteer, Rate Controller, Rinse Tank STK: 023420...................................................................................................$49,000 2012CASEIHSPX160 $33,000 134’Pull-Type, 600 Gal, 5 WayBodies, Raven Autoboom,6Section Accuboom, Duals STK: 024155 MELFORT 844.494.5844 AGRICULTURAL | CONSTRUCTION | TRUCKS &TRAILERS redheadequipment.ca 2006CASEIH8010 $155,000 14’ CIH2016Pickup, 520 Duals, Rocktrap,Pro 600Monitor, Std Rotor,MaurerTopper,FineCut Chopper,LongAuger STK: 021138 2011 CASE IH 4420 120’, Dlx Cab, 380s &650s, HID Light, Viper Pro, Smartrax Autosteer,Autoboom, Accuboom, Crop Dividers STK: 021959 ................................................$213,000 2000 CASE IH SPX2130 $69,900 78’,Autosteer, 2Setsof Tires,660 Gal STK:022316 midge for a number of years. In appearance, it looks very similar to Swede midge. That was one reason why it was mistaken for it,” Mori said. “So far, we only know it can infest flowers. It’s not all the flowers on a single plant. It’s usually only one or two flowers on a plant. It’s very sporadic across the field. We don’t think at this point in time that there’s a major yield loss caused by this midge,” he said. Pheromone traps are used to capture Swede midge. Female insects would disperse the chemical signal pheromone attracting male bug. A male would fly over after sensing it and mate with the female. With a trap, they’re able to synthesize the male by putting it into a lure. Using the traps, the new unknown midge was not sticking to the trap. “We noticed a few different things. There’s a pheromone trap that you can use to monitor for it and this new midge is not being caught on it. That indicates it’s a different species. There’s also some slight physical differences if you were to look at the adult but they’re very slight,” Mori said. Mori was able to find an alternative way to capture the midge. After sequencing a portion of its DNA and comparing it to that of Swede midge, he determined it was indeed, different. HARVEST SPECIALS 61 FT Morris Contour Drill w/12” Spacing........................... $89,000.00 MF 9220 30 FT. Swather......... $54,000.00 8370 Morris Air Tank 443 BU........$55,000.00 John Deere SP Swather w/ Honey Bee Header............... .$15,000.00 3450 Flexicoil Air Tank .......... .$16,000.00 8x53 Sakundiak Auger ..............$8,500.00 6240 Air Tank..............................$6,000.00 8630 Morris Air Tank .............. $79,000.00 Several Sizes Of New Meridian Augers On Hand *Hurricane Rotary Ditchers On Hand *1 - New Rotary Harrow - 45’ Your AGCO - Morris Dealer After Hours: Jim - 306-768-2740, John - 306-768-2401, Kevin - 306-768-2455 CARROT RIVER IMPLEMENTS INC. HWY #23 SOUTH Phone: (306)768-2715 Email: crimp@sasktel.net

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    FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 • THE NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST D3 To Prairie North WE HAVE 20, #2406 WESTEEL WIDE CORE GRAIN BINS IN STOCK. Six cones in stock right now for the 2406’s We also have 1805’s in stock with and without air available now. These 1805’s are built and ready to go. PHONE FOR PRICING DELIVERY IS AVAILABLE. Book early to avoid disappointment and delay in setup Worley Hoppers in stock and available. Call Rob or Allen at 1-306-752-2555 for pricing Only at Prairie North Home and Ag Centre Melfort, Sk.

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    D4 HARVEST THE NORTHEAST SUN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 Melfort & District Museum presents a FREE EVENT August 26th 2017 2pm-9pm @ the museum Entertainment Stage sponsored by CJVR FM and CK750; Freddie & Shelia Show, Darlene Tuleta, Creeland Dancers, Patrick Nippi, The Beatty Trek Family Activities; Ol’McDales Friendly Farm, Frontier Adventures Wagon Rides, Good to Go BBQ, Historical Demos and Games Bring Your Own Lawn Chair Parking at Fairgrounds www.melfortmuseum.org for full schedule 306-752-5870 New unit shows how to rescue someone trapped in grain By Ashley Robinson Regina Leader-Post It can happen faster than you think. One second you’re on top of a bin full of grain and the next you’re submerged in it. “(The grain) does act like quicksand. Once that auger’s on it moves super fast and the weight that you have just kind of sucks you down,” said Bobbi Kiesman, agricultural safety and health specialist with Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA). According to CASA it takes only 25 seconds for a person to become fully submerged in grain. At Canada’s Farm Progress Show this week, CASA launched a mobile grain demonstration and training unit. The rescue unit is the first of its kind in Canada. Previously, units had been rented from the United States for demonstrations. It was designed and manufactured by Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute in Humboldt. The mobile grain demonstration and training unit is made up by a trailer which has a grain bin in it filled with 110 bushels of wheat. There are two augers in the wheat and a dummy that sits on top of the grain. During the demonstration the augers are turned on and the dummy becomes partially submerged in the grain. Trained volunteers then complete a rescue. Pig barn mats are laid on top of the grain for the rescuers to stand on so they don’t put more pressure on the grain around the dummy. The rescuers then build a cofferdam around the dummy using rescue tubes. “Once we have it secured and everything’s nice and tight we put an auger inside the cofferdam with our victim, which is small and safe. And we start hauling the grain out so that we can get them out of this situation,” Keisman said. When a person is submerged in grain, it pushes in on them. It takes 900 pounds of force to pull somebody out of grain if they’re buried up to their neck, Keisman said. If a victim is buried for a long time their blood systems become restricted, which leads to the chance of the person getting crush and compartment syndrome. “When you’re fully engulfed in grain, at that point it’s blocking your airways so the chances of getting that person out, if their head’s underneath the grain, is very, very slim,” Keisman said. When rescuers get the victim out, it is important to take them to a hospital to be checked out right after. In 2015, there were seven fatalities involving grain entrapments in Canada. Four of those were children. This spurred CASA to partner with various groups to start the BeGrain- Safe Program and gather funding to build the mobile grain demonstration and training unit. The plan for the demonstration unit is to take it across the country to farm shows to do demonstrations. As well, CASA wants to train volunteer firefighters across the country to be able to do grain rescues. The rescue demonstrations CASA does at farm shows take 10 to 15 minutes. A real rescue can take anywhere from three to eight hours.

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    FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 • THE NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST D5

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    D6 HARVEST THE NORTHEAST SUN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 Injuries can be prevented this harvest season Ag Com TRANSPORT LTD. • WASH BAY • EXPANDED SHOP FOR ALL YOUR HEAVY TRUCK & TRAILER REPAIRS • SGI SAFETY INSPECTIONS • FULLY STOCKED PARTS ROOM • INCLUDING 1/4” TO 2” HYD. HOSES & BEARINGS FOR COMMERCIAL & AG NEEDS Office: 306-752-4363 Parts: 306-752-2628 101 South Ave., Melfort, SK MR TIRE 8 OR MORE TIRES • FREE DELIVERY IN SASKATCHEWAN SUMMER SALE $ 285 CHECK OUT OUR PICKUP TIRE PRICES CALL MYLO 306•921•6555 JEREMY 306•921•0068 Check out: www.mrtirecorp.com Farms across Canada vary in size, what they produce and how many people they employ. But like all other workplaces, there are inherent on-the-job safety hazards that need to be addressed in order to prevent injuries and save lives. Agriculture ranks the fourth most hazardous industry in Canada, with 12.9 deaths per 100,000 farm population. From 1990 to 2008, an average of 104 people died every year from agricultural incidents in Canada, according to the Canadian Agricultural Injury Reporting (CAIR) program. Along with the human cost, unintentional injuries have significant financial implications that total approximately $374 million each year. These unintentional injuries are the result of incidents such as motor vehicle collisions, entanglements with farm machinery, and rollovers. Unintentional injuries are preventable injuries. The right attitude toward safety and the right training saves lives. The Canada Safety Council encourages all farm operators and employees to seek proper training to ensure the safe operation of all vehicles and machinery on the farm. The farming environment Farms are more than just work sites; they are places where people of all ages live and play. Children grow up contributing to the family’s farming operation, while many FAIRY GLEN • Agricultural & Passenger Tires • Oil Filters and V belts • Co-op Fuels & 24-Hour Cardlock • Grain Bins & Hopper Bottoms ® • Agricultural Bearings • Cutting Parts • Bulk Fuel Delivery • Hyd Hose Repair • General Hardware & Tools • Confectionery Items FAIRY GLEN, SK 306-752-4044 5 24 04 44 4 • 306-752-4162 0 6 7 5 2 seasoned farmers never officially retire and continue working well into their golden years. For many, farming is more than a job – it is a way of life. A big part of this lifestyle involves the operation of machinery – everything from trucks to tractors, combines, ATVs, ARGOs and snowmobiles. Sadly, 70 per cent of agricultural fatalities involve machines. The right training, including refresher courses and regular conversations about the safe operation of machinery, can equip farm workers, visitors and those who live on farms with life-saving information and a safety-first attitude. Recommendations -Teach children safety fundamentals. This includes clearly identifying where farm machinery and vehicles are operated, and where they may not play. Children need to develop a healthy respect for the potential dangers of being near a moving machine or vehicle, and learn how to stay safe. -If you are the owner/operator of a farm, clearly communicate to your staff that risk-taking involving machinery or vehicles is not allowed or tolerated. Your employees should understand that you expect them to always operate in a safe manner. This includes no speeding and no impaired or distracted driving. -Make sure operators are competent, confident and capable when it comes to using machinery. If additional training or instruction is necessary, make safety the priority. Take the time to read manuals, ask questions and consult industry experts who can give you answers. Get training The Canada Safety Council offers the following safety training courses that may be of interest to farm operators and employees. -ARGO Operator Course -ATV Rider Course -Confined Spaces Training Course -Ladder Safety Training Course -Snowmobile Operators Course -Utility Terrain Vehicle (UTV) Side by Side Course -WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) Training Course Take the time to get the training you need to stay safe on the farm. It’s an investment in safety with a lifetime of benefits! CENTRAL AND NE SASK’S AGRICULTURAL REAL ESTATE SPECIALIST SERVICES FOR FARMLAND PROPERTIES * MLS ® System Listings * In-House Exclusive Confidential Listings * For Sale By Tender Campaigns * Buyer’s Brokerage Services * Comparable Sales Analysis & Market Valuations * Letters Of Opinion Of Value (Estate Valuation or Bank Financing) JAMES SCHINKEL, BSA BROKER/OWNER (306) 231-7077 JSchinkel@Sasktel.net www.JamesSchinkel.ca 1704 4th Avenue (Horizon Fertilizers Building) PO Box 2469, Humboldt, SK S0K 2A0

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    FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 • THE NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST D7 Crop diseases like blackleg can be managed By Joshua Santos Northeast Sun In the fields night and day, producers strenuously exert themselves in the hopes of witnessing prosperous crops. Despite their efforts, it may all be worthless as this disease ravenously plagues their farm. “Relative to southern Manitoba and east-central Alberta, the severity was lower in Saskatchewan based on provincial surveys in the past several years. More severe damage is often associated with short rotations, insect damage causing wounding of cotyledons, roots or light hail injuries,” said Agriculture and Agri- Food Canada (AAFC) Plant Pathology Research Scientist, Gary Peng. Blackleg is an infection many have become accustomed to. Destroying plants it requires an integrated management strategy utilizing agronomic practices to minimize yield loss. Peng was in Melfort recently during a joint field day with AAFC and Northeast Agriculture Research Farm (NARF) discussing the management of crop diseases and agronomy trials conducted. “We have two crop rotation trials at the site; one looking at long-term impact of short (back to back canola or just a 1-year break between canola) and moderate rotation on blackleg, canola yield and overall economics, and the other studying crop rotation systems. For example, canola-cereal-canola, canola, cereal-Pea-canola; Wheatbarley-wheat and Wheatbarley-flax-wheat etc) on crop productivity and pest control, especially in relation to fungicide application,” he stated. “Both are multi-site studies. The former has been on the farm for 10 years and the second trial has been conducted for 4 years,” he added. To check the virus, Peng pulls out 50 plants from each replicate and cuts at the soil line to determine the percentage of blackening inside the stem. This assessment will provide the data on incidence and severity. His research has found the imperativeness of a particular rotation pattern. The study, the one with 9-year data already, showed that crop rotation is certain a strong line of defense against blackleg; even a 2-year break is better than canola-wheatcanola. The key factor is the pathogen survival in stubble and the number of year it takes for stubble to decompose. The pathogen can’t survive in soil. It often takes at least two seasons for stubble on the soil surface to break down due to reduced microbial degradation,” he concluded. Trimble NEW!! EZ TMX Guide 2050 250 EZ EZGuide Guide250 500 EZFMX Guide Display 750 500 *Kodiak FMX (All LED withDisplay Colour Lighting Screens) (All with Colour Screens) --EZ Pilot Steer - Auto forPilot AG Machines - RTK Guidance -EZ Boom - Boom Control - EZ Steer - Auto Pilot -Laser Levels & Receivers - Field IQ Control System --Convey Laser Levels All&Conveyors/ Receivers Seed Fertilizer - AG Tenders Cameras --Atom TRIDEKON Jet Seed Sp Sprayer Openers - Crop Deflectors --Flexi AGRIMATICS Finger Vine - Grain Lifters Cart Weight System --NH Flexi Finger 3 Applicator Vine Lifters Kits - NH 3 Applicator Kits Ferré Farm Equipment Zenon Park, Sask. Phone: 306-767-2202 Fax: 306-767-2410 FALL & WINTER BOOKING SPECIAL SAVE THOUSANDS $$$ BOOK YOUR CUSTOM DESIGNED SUN ROOM NOW! WE WILL DO THE PREP AND HAVE YOURS INSTALLED IN LATE FALL OR EARLY SPRING FOR YOU TO ENJOY. PRICES LIKE THIS WON’T LAST FOREVER! Showroom located @ 17-7th St. W., Prince Albert 306-764-5470 00061160

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    D8 HARVEST THE NORTHEAST SUN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 Sask. remains the breadbasket of Canada By Stats Canada Almost 91% of the total cropland in Saskatchewan was seeded with field crops in 2016. Saskatchewan accounted for more than two-fifths of Canada’s total field crop acreage with 36.7 million acres, more than Alberta and Manitoba combined. Canola and spring wheat (excluding durum) remained the two largest crops in terms of area, while lentil area more than doubled from 2011. See Chart 1. Despite fewer farms in Saskatchewan in 2016 from five years earlier, the average farm size increased 7.0%. The average farm operator age in Saskatchewan rose from 54.2 years to 55.0 years, with 9.7% of all operators being under the age of 35. The proportion of female farm operators increased to one quarter of all farm operators in Saskatchewan. While the number of beef cattle declined from five years earlier, Saskatchewan remained the second largest beef cattle producing province in Canada. Saskatoon berries accounted for over half of the fruits, berries and nuts area in the province, while sweet corn was the largest field vegetable crop by area. Primary agriculture represented 9.7% of provincial gross domestic product (agricultural GDP) in 2013. This percentage increased to 13.5% when agricultural input and service providers, primary producers, food and beverage processors, and food retailers and wholesalers industries were taken into account (Statistics Canada. 2013. Special tabulation, based on 2013 gross domestic product by industry – provincial and territorial). Agricultural operations in Saskatchewan employed 25,927 people in 2015. The decrease in the number of farms in Saskatchewan is less pronounced than in the 2011 Census The 2016 Census of Agriculture counted 34,523 census farms in Saskatchewan, down 6.6% from 2011, and higher than the decline at the national level (-5.9%). However, the percentage decrease in Saskatchewan was lower than the 2011 Census (-16.6%). Total farm area constant, area of cropland increases The total farm area over which farmers had stewardship in Saskatchewan stayed constant (-0.1%) between 2011 and 2016 at 61.6 million acres. Since 2011, rented farm area in Saskatchewan rose 15.8% to 17.0 million acres. This was the largest increase in Canada and accounted for almost three-quarters of the gain in rental area at the national level. Saskatchewan accounted for 42.4% of all rented farm area in Canada in Chart 2 Chart 1 Provincial distribution of total field crop area, 2016 Other 1.2% Quebec 3.5% Ontario 9% Manitoba 12.7% Alberta 26.8% May not equal 100% due to rounding Source: census of Agriculture 2016. Total farm area, which is land owned or operated by an agricultural operation, includes: cropland; summerfallow; improved and unimproved pasture; woodlands and wetlands; all other land (including idle land, and land on which farm buildings are located). While the total farm area was stable, the average farm size grew from 1,668 acres in 2011 to 1,784 acres in 2016, and the area of cropland increased 11.2% to 40.5 million acres. Part of the gain in cropland was due to the return of land which had been idle from flooding at the time of the last census, but reductions in summerfallow and conversion from pasture also contributed to the gain. Canola is the leading crop Saskatchewan ranked first among the provinces in terms of total field crop area, accounting for almost half of Canada’s total field crop area. Field crop area rose by almost 5 million acres since 2011, the largest absolute increase in the country. Canola was the leading field crop by area reported in Saskatchewan in 2016, followed by spring wheat (excluding durum) and lentils. Saskatchewan accounted for the largest area of these crops in Canada. By comparison, the leading field crops in 2011 were canola, spring wheat (excluding durum) and durum wheat. In 2016, the area of canola and lentils was larger than all other provinces combined. While spring wheat (excluding durum) remained the second largest crop in Saskatchewan by area, the total area fell 16.3% from 2011. Conversely, lentil production rose 106.2% over the same period. See Chart 2 Oilseed and grain t y p e farms accounted for 62.3% of all Field crop 2011 acerage 2016 acerage Canola 9,778,799 11,069,557 Spring Wheat (exc. durham) 7,991,553 6,690,9987 Lentils 2,476,791 5,106,444 Saskatchewan 46.8% farms, and 79.7% of all gross farm receipts in Saskatchewan with $11.0 billion, the largest proportion of revenue from these types of farms nationally. Beef cattle type farms were second with 20.8% of all farms in the province and 12.3% of all gross farm receipts. Saskatoon berries account for half of the fruits, berries and nuts area The total area of land in fruits, berries and nuts increased 2.0% from 2011 to 1,953 acres in 2016. Most of the increase in area was attributable to Saskatoon berries, up 13.2% from 2011 to 991 acres, accounting for half of the total fruits, berries and nuts area in the province. Meanwhile, field vegetable area rose 23.3% to 943 acres. Sweet corn remained the leading vegetable by area, up 20.2% from 2011 to 155 acres. Saskatchewan’s field vegetable area was the ninth largest in Canada. The greenhouse flower and vegetable production area declined 26.8% from 2011 to 1.6 million square feet in 2016 as a result of a 32.4% reduction in flower area to 1.3 million square feet. Despite the decline, almost three-quarters of the total greenhouse area in Saskatchewan was dedicated to flowers. Saskatchewan still has the second largest cattle herd The number of cattle in Saskatchewan decreased by 2.1% from 2011 to 2.6 million head in 2016. Despite the decrease, Saskatchewan continued to report the second largest cattle herd in the country, following Alberta. The number of beef cattle in Saskatchewan declined 2.3% to 1.5 million head, as some producers sold stock to take advantage of higher prices and retire or shift to other aspects of agricultural production. The number of farms reporting beef cattle declined 12.1%. The number of dairy cows in Saskatchewan was relatively stable from five years earlier, edging down 0.1% from 2011 to 28,022 head in 2016. Meanwhile, the number of farms reporting dairy cows declined 12.3% to 299. Saskatchewan ranked fifth in terms of number of pigs in Canada in 2016. The number of pigs in Saskatchewan increased 0.5% from 2011 to 1.0 million head in 2016. The growth was due to good market conditions from 2011 to 2016, which boosted the price of pigs relative to the period preceding the 2011 census. The sheep flock declined 2.9% to 110,015 animals in 2016. More young farm operators There were 45,350 farm operators in Saskatchewan in 2016, down 8.3% from 2011 and exceeding the decline in the number of farms (-6.6%). Chart 3 Age group 2011 2016 % of operators % of operators Under 35 8.8 9.7 35-54 41.8 34.4 55 and older 49.3 55.9 (May not equal 100 per cent due to rounding) One-quarter (24.9%) of the farm operators in Saskatchewan in 2016 were women, up from 22.9% in 2011. Nationally, women accounted for 28.7% of farm operators in 2016. From 2011 to 2016, the proportion of farm operators in the oldest age category (55 years and older) increased 6.6 percentage points to 55.9%. The proportion of young operators (under 35 years old) also rose, up 0.9 percentage points to 9.7%. Over the five-year period, the average operator age in Saskatchewan rose from 54.2 years to 55.0 years. See Chart 3 In 2015, 44.4% of farm operators in Saskatchewan reported working more than 40 hours a week on average on their farm operations, down from 46.6% five years earlier, but above the national average of 37.5%. Meanwhile, fewer farmers reported working off the farm. In 2016, 42.0% of farm operators in Saskatchewan reported having an off-farm job in 2015, down from 46.1% in 2010. Nationally, 44.4% of farm operators worked off the farm. Saskatchewan farm operations have the most favourable expense to sales ratio Gross farm receipts in Saskatchewan were $13.8 billion in 2015, ranking third nationally. Meanwhile, operating expenses totalled $10.8 billion. Despite an increase in expenses, the total operating profit margin for farmers in Saskatchewan was the most favourable in Canada. On average, for every dollar in sales, farms had 78 cents in expenses in 2015 for an expense-to-receipt ratio of 0.78. In 2010, Saskatchewan’s expense-to-receipt ratio was 0.76. The ratio of expenses to receipts varied by farm type. In 2015, oilseed and grain type farms had the most favourable ratio at 0.77, deteriorating from 0.73 in 2010. The expenseto-receipt ratio for hog and pig type farms deteriorated the most from 0.87 to 0.96. Other agriculture highlights in Saskatchewan In Saskatchewan, 3.1% of farms reported having renewable energy producing systems in 2015, compared with 5.3% nationally. In Saskatchewan, 3.8% of farms reported selling agricultural products directly to consumers in 2015. In Saskatchewan, 27.2% of farms reported being incorporated in 2016, up from 18.5% in 2011. Incorporated farms accounted for 25.1% of the total farms in Canada in 2016. The 2016 Census of Agriculture marked the first time farm operators were asked to report if the farm operation had a written succession plan. In 2016, 8.8% of farms in Saskatchewan had a written succession plan, compared with 8.4% nationally. The proportion of farms in Saskatchewan producing organic products declined from 2.9% in 2011 to 2.5% in 2016. Nationally, farms producing organic products accounted for 2.2% of the total farms in 2016. In Saskatchewan, 41.5% of farms reported using automated steering technology in 2015. In Saskatchewan, the value of the land and buildings per acre increased 76.0% (in 2016 constant dollars) from 2011 to $1,210 per acre in 2016. However, this was well below the national average of $2,696 per acre.

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