Topics
Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
Peterborough Examiner Rememberance Day 2016
Newspapers | Education / Politics / Festivals & Events / Government / Safety & Security / Community / Lifestyle / Advertisement 2016-11-10 09:10:29
Page 1 of 2
  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 1

    AD{TS4895687} REMEMBRANCE DAY IT’S IMPORTANT TODAY TO STOP AND REMEMBER THOSE MEN AND WOMEN WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR OTHERS. JEFF LEAL, MPP 236 King Street Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7L8 T-705-742-3777 F-705-742-1822 E - jleal.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 2

    AD{TS4892684} 2 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 A prisoner of war at 11 years old Irena Wallace remembers her childhood during the Second World War By Elizabeth Bower-Gordon When thinking back to what she calls the “ungodly” part of her life during the Second World War, with memories of prisoner camps, near starvation and being shipped across three continents, Irena Wallace can pinpoint the moment that her relatively happy childhood suddenly changed to darkness. It was 6 a.m. on Feb. 10, 1940 and there was loud knocking at her door. Irena, who had just celebrated her 11th birthday in her native Poland, recalls her father opening the door to a pair of Russian soldiers wielding large guns and telling the family they were under arrest and were being taken as prisoners to Siberia. What followed were several years of misery, loneliness, hunger and fear for the young girl who would survive being taken to Siberia, Uzbekistan, Iran, South Africa and England before finally making a home in Canada after the war was over. Irena, who is now 87 and lives with her husband Mitchell in Peterborough’s west end, says she is thankful for those who lost their lives bringing that war to an end, but on Remembrance Day, it can still be very difficult to think back and remember. The mother-of-four, who came to this country not knowing any English and filled with hope that this was a Irena and Mitchell Wallace in their west-end Peterborough home. country of peace, says that on each Nov. 11, she chooses not to reflect on the war but instead focuses on how Canada finally gave her the freedom to get a good education, a steady job and a stable home-life. “I am just very happy to be here in Canada,” she says from her home on Afton Drive. “Canada gave me that Photo by Elizabeth Bower-Gordon freedom to do what I wanted to do with my life.” Irena (nee Krzyskow) says she had a happy life in Poland where she lived with her parents, who were both teachers, and her three siblings. Although her mother died from typhus when Irena was eight, she says the family was able to find some happiness again when her father remarried and her new step-mother took good care of the house, property and family. In 1939, rumours abounded that the Russians and Germans were going to invade Poland. Flyers were dropped from planes across the country, telling people that an invasion may be coming and later that year, she recalls starting to see Nazi Germany fliers, showing caricatures of Jews and blaming them for the suffering of Polish people. “They were ugly mockeries of Jews, and knowing them as part of our community and hard working people, this was unjustified slander that we had to ignore,” she wrote in an unpublished autobiography of her life. “These were our countrymen – fellow Poles!” When the Russians invaded and soldiers knocked at her door, Irena says it was a great shock. “It felt like the end of the world,” she says. The family was given a few hours to pack what they could, including bedding, cutlery and clothing, while her father secretly started a fire in his bedroom fireplace to burn documents revealing he had been a soldier in the First World War and had fought against the Russian army. Confused and frightened, she says they were taken by a horse-drawn sleigh to the train station and forced into cattle cars. There was a small ladder for the children to climb up. One small heater in the centre was the only source of heat and she recalls there being 60 people in the cart, all sleeping on bunks. They were given true north strong and free. This Remembrance Day, we hold the courageous men and women who serve this country in our hearts and offer our deepest gratitude. Thank you to those who have defended our freedoms. And thank you to the families who have trusted us to serve them. †Registered Trademark of CARP, used under license. Dignity Memorial is a division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC. COMSTOCK-KAYE Life Celebration Centre PETERBOROUGH 705-745-4683 ComstockKaye.com

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 3

    AD{TS4893133} AD{TS4902202} AD{TS4893624} Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 3 Irena (right) and her sister Mary during the Second World War. Supplied photo soup, bread and boiled water during the six-day-long trek to Siberia. “The fearful people, alienated from their homes and homeland, cried, sung church songs through tear-filled eyes and prayed,” she wrote in her autobiography. “Children complained about their hunger and cold.” She remembers Russian soldiers assuring her that going to Siberia would be like going to “heaven” but of course, when she got there, she says life was desolate. The barracks were over-crowded. Her father was forced into manual labour, often cutting trees in the nearby forests to get lumber for new camps. And the temperatures would sometimes dip to -40C. She remembers one winter morning when she was so cold that she had to huddle with others to get their body heat. Hungry and listless, she says she lined up for a daily ration of bread when the woman giving out the food told her there was nothing left. The woman had been joking, she says, but Irena says she had almost fainted. To this day, she says, “I can still feel the pain of that desperate and fearful moment.” Life changed a couple of years later when the Germans were approaching the Russian border and Irena’s family was taken to Uzbekistan because her father was ordered to fight as a soldier for the Russians. Her time there was also difficult, with little food, no school and extreme poverty. When her father left for the fighting, Irena and her sister Mary had to fend for themselves. In 1942, her father was granted permission to move the girls to Persia where she lived in a monastery with orphans and children whose parents were at war. The following year, she was sent to South Africa to a Polish school and settlement for her high school education. After the war ended, she says the Polish children in African schools were sent to various countries including England, New Zealand, Israel and Canada. Irena travelled to England where she met up with her father and barely recognized him. He had been through war, serious illness and constant worry about his family. “We noticed a physical change in him,” she says. The family then decided to move to Canada where Irena’s aunt was living, in Manitoba. Irena went to school, learned English, took a typewriting course and got a job at the Toronto Dominion Bank. After falling in love with Mitchell, they married. “I got married to a Canadian with a big heart and a good sense of humour, who made me feel like I belonged in this country and helped me forget the difficult ten years of my past life,” she wrote. We Remember. The couple raised their children in Toronto and, at age 74, retired to Peterborough. When thinking back on her life during the war, Irena says she is thankful her father was able to guide and take care of them as she remembers many orphans who had no parents “acting as their safety net” and many who died. This Remembrance Day, as she looks at her two young grandchildren, happy, healthy and living stable lives, she will be thankful that they have never known the hunger, fear or violence of war. “Everyone should have a chance to have a better life,” she says. “I hate the war and the people that start the wars.” Luxury Condominiums WE WILL REMEMBER THEM BILL SMITH 11 th HOUR 11 th DAY 11 th MONTH Please Observe MINUTES 2 SILENCE

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 4

    AD{TS4900849} AD{TS4895689} AD{TS4897989} 4 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 An ordinary man who accomplished extraordinary things Peterborough museum showcases military history of Sir Arthur Currie Kim Reid, curator of the Peterborough Museum and Archives, is encouraging people to learn more about Canada’s military history by visiting the exhibition about General Sir Arthur Currie. Photo by Elizabeth Bower-Gordon By Elizabeth Bower-Gordon The great irony of one of the finest commanders in Canadian military – known as a gentleman, a hero and a brilliant strategist who was the first Canadian to lead Canadians into war – is that much of his post-war reputation was focused not on his military achievements, but on controversies. General Sir Arthur Currie, who ended the First World War as Lt. General Commanding Officer of the Canadian Corps, developed key strategies to keep his fellow Canadians alive while still winning battles, says Kim Reid, curator of the Peterborough Museum and Archives. Yet after the war, she says a shadow hung over Currie because he had used once military money to pay off personal debt (a practice that she says was not unusual at the time) and had followed orders to take his troops into battle the day the war had ended, leading to accusations that he had needlessly sacrificed lives. Reid says Currie deserved praise, not condemnation. “If he was here right now, I’d shake that man’s hand,” says Reid at the museum on Hunter Street East. The museum is hosting an exhibit on Currie, which features artifacts, photos and the story of the man who was born in Strathroy, ON, raised on a farm by a family with no military history and yet rose through the ranks from a militia gunner to become an influential military commander. The travelling exhibit, produced by the Museum of Strathroy-Caradoc, is open in Peterborough on Remembrance Day from noon to 5 p.m. and will be on display until Dec. 11. Currie had moved west to B.C. in his youth and his first foray into the military was in 1897 when he became a gunner in the 5th (B.C.) Regiment, Canadian Garrison Artillery. He rose rapidly through the ranks. When the First World War began, he was a lieutenant colonel in charge of 900 men, the exhibit states. This era was the beginning of a new kind of We salute our veterans and those who serve. 705-740-2218 www.tomsheatingandcooling.ca We remember. We remember their service. We remember their sacrifice. Peterborough City Council

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 5

    AD{TS4902295} AD{TS4895658} AD{TS4902182} Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 5 warfare that involved trenches, chemical weapons and new levels of technology including tanks and spy planes, Reid says. Currie became known for his motto: “Pay the price of victory in shells, not lives.” Reid says his brilliant strategies, recognizance and preparedness helped save many men’s lives as war raged through Europe. A diorama in the exhibit showcases one of the strategies he used: Sending artillery far ahead of his men, to battle the enemy and take down obstacles such as barbed wire as his men advanced through the smoke and fire. This tactic, known as the creeping barrage, sent artillery fire forward in stages, just ahead of the advancing soldiers. His greatest controversy came in the final hours of the war on Nov. 11, 1918, known as Armistice Day, when he took the city of Mons in Belgium. Reid says Currie was following orders but after the war, then-Defence Minister Sir Sam Hughes accused Currie of needlessly sacrificing lives. She says there had been tension between the two men because Currie wouldn’t promote Hughes’ son, Garnet. After the war, Currie became principal and vice chancellor of McGill University in Montreal, leading the school through the Great Depression. He held this position with distinction from 1920 to 1933. Rumours persisted, however, that he had “butchered men” in the war. When the city of Mons erected a plaque in 1927 commemorating its liberation, the Port Hope Evening Guide, then controlled by the Hughes family, published an editorial stating the capture of Mons was a “deliberate and useless waste of human life.” Currie successfully sued the paper for libel and the jury awarded him $500. Reid believes the persistent rumours hung over Currie like a dark shadow but that the successful lawsuit exonerated him. “It was a dark chapter that haunted him,” she says. He remained devoted to soldiers for the rest of his life, including becoming president of the Last Post Fund in 1924. This fund gave financial assistance to bury soldiers who were penniless when they died. From 1929 to his death in 1933, Currie also served as grand president of the Canadian Legion of the British Empire Services League. Reid says many of Peterborough’s seniors have come in to see the exhibit so far but she hopes the younger generation will also come in, especially on Remembrance Day, to learn about one of the greats from Canadian military history. “He is an unsung hero,” she says. FACTBOX Sir Arthur William Currie’s accomplishments include: • Knight Commander of the most Honourable Order of Bath • Companion of the most Honourable Order of Bath • Knight Grand Cross of the most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George • Knight Commander of the most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George • British War Medal • Victory Medal • Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal • Croix de Commandeur Legion d’Honneur • Ordre de la Couronne (Grand Officier) (Belgian) • Croix de Guerre (Belgian) • Croix de Guerre (French) • Distinguished Service Medal (U.S.A) • Croix de Guerre avec Palm (French) Source: Peterborough Museum and Archives Lieutenant General Sir Arthur W Currie Photo Getty Images NOTES: The Peterborough museum received a grant of $12,196 from the Department of Canadian Heritage to support the Currie exhibition. “As the cost to rent and ship exhibitions continues to rise, the importance of this kind of funding increases,” says Jon Oldham, museum programming assistant..... There is a bust of Currie, created in 1969, on display at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston. To All Veterans past and Present….. A heartfelt thanks We honour and remember Those who have Given to our Country From All the staff at Grainger’s Cleaners Dry Cleaning and Laundromat 885 Lansdowne St. W. (at Goodfellow) 705-742-3831 Let us recognize them and the great work they do in their communities 1500 Lansdowne Street West, Peterborough. 705-749-1500

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 6

    AD{TS4905714} AD{TS4892689} AD{TS4904878} AD{TS4904866} AD{TS4899891} AD{TS4904487} 6 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 A piece of war history Apsley man shares First World War autograph book signed by soldiers By Elizabeth Bower-Gordon Soldiers in the First World War would draw, write poems or scribble in the autograph book of nurse Lillian Henry. One wrote a Persian proverb, others drew pictures of their loved ones at home and another wrote a poem: “Although the nation is at war I do not think it’s right to ask a man of twenty four like me to go and fight.” When the now-faded, green autograph book came up for auction through Apsley Auctioneers a few years ago, John F. Beeton couldn’t resist. Beeton, an 85-year-old retired Durham police officer who now lives on Chandos Lake in the Apsley area, says he is an antique collector with a particular interest in military history since he served in the Royal Canadian Army LEST WE FORGET Sarah Evans Sales Representative 705.768.62788 Eastern Realty Inc., Brokerage John F. Beeton collects antiques and war memorabilia. He is sharing an autograph book from the First World War, signed by soldiers. medical corps from 1958 to 1964 and his great uncle Cpl Charles Beeton was killed in Turkey during the First World War. He doesn’t remember how much he Division of PPG architectural coatings Lest We Forget 39 George St. N. Peterborough 705-745-6874 www.ppg.com Pages from the First World War autograph book. paid for the book, but says it’s a priceless look back at soldier’s lives from the early part of the 20th century. In one drawing, C. Smith R.N.D., depicted a naive looking soldier asking his stern-looking superior if he could take some time off. “I’ve arranged to take my wife and family to the seaside for September. I hope it will be quite convenient,” he captioned the drawing. Others longed for loved ones. On Dec. 8, 1916, Pte. A Everitt, of the Royal Marines, wrote, Lest We Forget 637 The Queensway, Unit Unit 8 8 (Queensway Peterborough, ON Court) 637 The Queensway, Unit 8 Peterborough, 705-745-7694 ON www.peterboroughbathrenovators.com (Queensway Court) Peterborough, ON www.peterboroughbathrenovators.co REMEMBERING THOSE WHO FOUGHT FOR OUR FREEDOM HOWIE’S BLINDS 705 750-0656 Photos by Elizabeth Bower-Gordon “The longer that I stay here The longer I remain And the longer that I think of you I long for you again.” He drew a picture of a woman reaching out her arms to a soldier. During Christmas of that year, Pte. A. D. Davis, 8th Gloster Regt., wrote, “Wishing you a merry Xmas 1916.” A soldier from Grimsby, Ont. sketched a man smoking a pipe and a man watching a train depart. Henry G. Lyons, of the 58th Canadians, signed the sketches on Jan. 16, 1917. Although it’s faded and difficult to see, there’s a tiny scribbling on the final page, in the bottom right-hand corner, by Pte. W. Tennant who wrote: “By hook or by crook, I’ll write last in this book.” Some families may recognize their ancestor’s names in this article and want to look at the autograph book. Beeton says he’s happy to share. While he won’t give the book away, he’d like to make copies for those whose family members wrote poems or drew sketches. Remembrance Day is an important time to share this piece of Canadian history, he says, and he hopes it will live on for many generations. Beeton plans to eventually donate the nurse’s book to the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. S&B FOOD MART 96 Mill Street, Warsaw “Your Town Lotto Centre” 652-8381 MARYAM MONSEF, MP Peterborough-Kawartha In remembrance of those who fought for our freedom and in honour of those who continue to do so Suite 4-417 Bethune Street, Peterborough 705-745-2018 • maryammonsef.ca

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 7

    AD{TS4893111} AD{TS4894133} AD{TS4892990} AD{TS4895730} AD{TS4900572} AD{TS4893300} Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 7 A special way to honour veterans, soldiers Faith Dickinson creates fleece blankets bearing red and white maple leaves By Elizabeth Bower-Gordon When Faith Dickinson visited war veterans at Extendicare Lakefield last year to drop off blankets she had made to mark Remembrance Day, she stayed for nearly two hours looking at the former soldiers’ photos and hearing their stories. The Lakefield teen says that hearing people’s stories of when they served in war is what motivates her to keep up her Sponsor a Soldier campaign, which raises money for the red-andwhite fleece blankets. “Even when people sponsor the campaign, I hear their own stories about their parents or grandparents who were in the war,” Dickinson says. “It keeps me going.” This is the third year that Dickinson, a Grade 9 student at Thomas A. Stewart Secondary School, has been making the blankets for soldiers and veterans. She sends some to troops overseas and takes others to veterans, sometimes in legions, hospitals or nursing homes. For a $30 donation, she creates a blanket, bearing red and white maple leafs, and double knots fleece strips around the edges. She has made 500 blankets for the soldiers over two years and hopes to make at least 200 more this year after the campaign, which started on Thanksgiving weekend and wraps up tomorrow. Dickinson, the daughter of Carrie and Mike Dickinson, started out four years ago by making blankets for people who had cancer. She made one for her aunt, who had breast cancer, and her aunt loved it, saying she’d cuddle it during treatments. Then Dickinson made one for a retiring teacher, who she says cried with gratitude over the thoughtful gift. “That’s when I told my mom, ‘I want to make everyone feel that good,’” she recalls. After starting Cuddles for Cancer, she has made more than 2,500 blankets in total. Each one takes about 90 minutes to make, she says. The Sponsor a Soldier campaign was born when Dickinson and her mother helped pack boxes of goodies for soldiers through the local Yellow Ribbon Campaign. They realized the blankets might also be a welcome gift in the packages for soldiers serving overseas. She says she gets names and addresses of soldiers through the Yellow Ribbon Campaign and donors also give her the names and addresses of their loved ones serving overseas. This year, she says she hopes to send some to those serving in Poland, Ukraine and Iraq. After her local deliveries, she says she usually travels to the veterans’ wing at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto. Faith Dickinson, a Grade 9 student at Thomas A. Stewart Secondary School, hopes to create 200 more fleece blankets for this year’s Sponsor a Soldier campaign. Supplied photo FACTBOX How to donate? There are three way to donate to the Sponsor a Soldier campaign: • E-transfer money to cuddlesforcancer@hotmail.com • Make a donation at Peterborough Fabricland, at Portage Place Shopping Centre on Chemong Rd. • Send a cheque or money order, made out to Cuddles for Cancer, to P.O. Box 1317, Lakefield, Ontario, K0L 2H0 Peterborough and the Kawarthas Association of REALTORS® Inc. We Will Always Remember 2016 Phone: 705-745-5724 www.peterboroughrealestate.org @PtboMemCentre #PMCRocks facebook.com/ ptbomemcentre memorialcentre.ca 705.743.3561 Lest We Forget …. On November 11th, let us give thanks for our Freedom ... Warden J. Murray Jones and County Council Providing: Nursing • Personal Support Property Maintenance for over 30 years. Our Veterans deserve our respect, our praise, our gratitude, and our caring Nightingale – “Our Caring You’ll Remember” 705-652-6118 We Remember. We Shall Not Forget Krista Costa, Sales Representative Century 21 United Realty 1-877-742-9779 • www.gardensofpeterborough.ca Local. Family Owned. Canadian

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 8

    AD{TS4899938} AD{TS4904752} AD{TS4899666} AD{TS4893438} AD{TS4902284} AD{TS4899725} 8 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 Jim Lillico served his country and his community Jim and Ruth Lillico relax in their home in Canterbury Gardens. Photo by Elizabeth Bower-Gordon Auto • Home •Farm Business • Financial Lest we forget! Otonabee-South-Monaghan Township 295-6852 Former Peterborough lawyer served in the navy during the Second World War By Elizabeth Bower-Gordon Every year, for the past 15 years or so, Jim Lillico has attended Peterborough’s Remembrance Day services at Confederation Square with his sons Peter and David. “We have gone to the cenotaph together in snow, sun and freezing rain,” says Peter, a local lawyer. When his now 95-year-old father, who was once himself a prominent Peterborough lawyer, fell and injured himself one year, the family instead gathered together at their father’s home to watch the service on television. It’s important for them to all be together on Nov. 11, Peter says, as it’s a time that Jim reflects on his time in the navy – first as an ASA Accredited Senior Agent DEAN BRIDGES Sales Representative dean.bridges@century21.ca ordinary seaman on a minesweeper in the Atlantic and later as a sub-lieutenant, doing convoy escort duty from Halifax. It’s also a time for Jim to reflect on his high school friends, from PCVS, who never made it home. Jim, who grew up in Peterborough and attended Queen Mary Public School, was a track-and-field athlete, violinist and a captain in the PCVS Cadet Corps before graduating from the high school as head boy in 1940. He was studying at the University of Toronto when he decided to enlist. He struggles to remember the details, as he sits with his wife Ruth in his home at Canterbury Gardens on Sherbrooke St., but suggests that Peter might be better able to tell his story. Peter tells the story he has heard often LEST WE FORGET From the management and staff of BRUCE MALY PLUMBING AND DRAIN SERVICES INC. 705-740-6035 www.brucemalyplumbing.com from his father: Although Jim had been expected to go into officer training, because he was a university student, he instead joined as an ordinary seaman because officer training would take too long and he wanted to get into the action as soon as possible. “He took a two-week radar course because it was the quickest way to get to sea,” Peter explains. After training in Halifax. N.S., Jim served on the minesweeper HMCS Lachine, and became an able bodied seaman. In 1944, his captain recommended him for officer training, and he was eventually appointed as sub lieutenant. Jim was posted to the corvette HMCS The Pas, doing convoy escort duty from Halifax. Throughout his time in the Second World Lest We Forget

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 9

    AD{TS4902244} AD{TS4892706} AD{TS4899647} Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 9 Jim Lillico married his high school sweetheart Jeanne Marie Ketcheson in 1945, while he was on leave. War, Jim maintained correspondence with his high school sweetheart Jeanne Marie Ketcheson. They married in May 1945, while Jim was on leave. After being discharged later that year, Jim went on to study law at Osgoode Hall in Toronto and became a successful lawyer in Peterborough with his office on Hunter St. The couple had three children: David, Peter and Nancy Anne. Jim served his country in a time of war and then went on to serve his community by giving his time to groups such as the Peterborough Kiwanis Club, the Victorian Order of Nurses, St. Andrew’s Church and the Peterborough Civic Hospital. He also maintained his love of the violin and played for the Peterborough Symphony. Jim Lillico served during the Second World War. After his wife’s death, Jim remarried in 1999 to Ruth Sage McIntyre Standish. Tomorrow, as hundreds of people bow their heads in silence during the Remembrance service in Peterborough, Jim says he will be happy to be in the crowd remembering all that his generation did to win the war and fight for freedom. He loves to see people wearing the bright red poppies on their lapels and commends a fellow Canterbury Gardens resident, Jean Morgan, for wearing her poppy every day of the year. “It’s important,” he says, “to remember.” Our Veterans should never be forgotten Arbor Memorial Inc. Nisbett Funeral Home by Arbor Memorial In Remembrance: Edward Franklin Landry Lt. Edward Franklin Landry with his wife Teenie. Supplied photo 705-745-3211 nisbettfuneralhome.com Lieutenant Edward Franklin Landry was born Dec. 15, 1887 in Faraday Township, Hastings county, the youngest son of Peter Landry (1840) and Sarah Margaret Booth (1849). He joined the 109th Battlion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force on Dec. 29 1915. After his officer’s training at Kingston, Ont., he was posted overseas with the 109th. He served in England and France with the 109th Battliom, 173rd Battlion, 2nd Reserve Battlion and the 54th Koteray Battlion. His Canadian service included the 2nd Central Ontario Regimental depot and the district depots 2 and 4. Severely wounded at Arras in Sept 1918, he spent time in the hospital in London and another in the Christie Hospital in Toronto. He was discharged on April 9, 1920 and married Teenie Atcheson in May of that year. They returned to Highland Grove and purchased the general store form S.W. Reynolds. He spent the next 26 years running the store and serving his community as reeve of Cardiff Township for eight years and warden of Haliburton County in 1939. Mr. Landry died in Peterborough. LAKEVIEW BOWL LTD. Proud Supporter of our Canadian Legion. May we always remember all of those who served. MARKET PLAZA, GEORGE STREET 705-743-4461 We honour those who have given their lives serving Canadians and helping others www.alfcurtis.com Peterborough 370 Parkhill Road E. 705-742-4690 Linday 216 St. David Street 705-324-6690 Belleville 1983 Old Highway #2 -Coming 613-966-3990 Soon-

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 10

    AD{TS4900866} AD{TS4899650} AD{TS4899671} AD{TS4899676} AD{TS4897819} AD{TS4902559} AD{TS4893189} 10 Lest We Forget • Remembrance Day 2016 Peterborough Examiner, Thursday November 10, 2016 Lest We Forget Remembrance Day service Township of Douro-Dummer 894 South Street, Warsaw 705-652-8392 HAVELOCK BELMONT Branch 389 8 Ottawa St. ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION BRANCH 77 10 Nichols St., Lakefield, ON (705) 652-7988 City police Chief Murray Rodd and his fellow officers walk past a row of wreaths at the Cenotaph during the Remembrance Day Service on Wednesday November 11, 2015 at Confederation Square in Peterborough, Ont. Clifford Skarstedt/Peterborough Examiner/Postmedia Network Thank You to all Service Men and Women Past...Present and Future. 267 Charlotte Street, Peterborough (under the yellow awnings) 705.742.6134 This year’s Remembrance Day service in Peterborough will again be held at Confederation Square on Nov. 11 and there will be addresses from Mayor Daryl Bennett and legion president Joel Chandler. The parade is to arrive at the Citizens War Memorial by 10:25 a.m., followed by the playing of O Canada at 10:30 a.m. Wreaths will be placed by the following groups and organizations: • Memorial Cross recipients • Government of Canada • Province of Ontario • County of Peterborough • City of Peterborough • Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment Peacekeepers • Royal Canadian Legion Branch 52 • Peterborough Naval Association • Air Force Association of Canada • Korea Veterans Association • P.N.A. Merchant Navy • First Nations Veterans • Peterborough United Services Institute • Royal Canadian Legion Branch 52 Associates • Royal Canadian Legion Branch 52 Ladies Auxiliary • Peterborough Naval Association Ladies Auxiliary • Veterans Affairs Canada • The War Amps • Dutch Canadian Association • Military Family Support Network • The Salvation Army • Peterborough Police Services • Peterborough Fire Department • Peterborough Paramedics • Youth of Peterborough This year's parade marshal is Mike Plumpton while the parade chairman and emcee is David Edgerton. There will be lunch available at the local legion, 1550 Lansdowne St. E., following the service. To those who have made the ultimate sacrifice and those who continue to fight in the name of freedom, we pay tribute. ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION BRANCH 300 27 King St., Norwood, ON (705) 639-2374 Harry Brown V.C. Branch OMEMEE LEGION 46 King Street East Omemee, ON Remembrance Day Dinner Nov 11th @ 6pm Service Nov. 11th @ 11am (705) 799-5095 • (705) 799-1540 rcl497@bellnet.ca We honour all veterans, especially the 9 who call Fairhaven their home.

Page 1 of 2

Please wait