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Professional Engineers
Newspapers | Engineering 2016-01-26 09:23:03
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    46 th Annual Professional Engineers’ Day Friday, January 29, 2016 The Thursday Evening Social will be held Jan. 28 at Canadore College (Commerce Court) starting at 5:00 p.m. North Bay Chapter An Advertising Feature of the North Bay Nugget Tuesday, January 26, 2016 The Role of Professional Engineering in Ontario’s Industrial Economy By George Comrie, M.Eng., P.Eng., CMC, FEC President-elect, Professional Engineers Ontario IT’S ONCE AGAIN my pleasure to join the professional engineers and engineering technologists of North Bay for their 46th annual symposium, this year on the theme of Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing. Professional Engineers Ontario (PEO) regulates the practice of professional engineering in Ontario in the public interest, under the authority of the Professional Engineers Act. We do this primarily by licensing qualified individuals to practise engineering, permitting firms to offer engineering services to the public under a Certificate of Authorization, and by establishing and enforcing standards of practice and ethical conduct. Licensed practitioners are expected to demonstrate in their work a strong commitment to public welfare – which is broadly defined to include safeguarding of life, health, property, economic interests, the public welfare or the environment – and to put the public interest ahead of their own selfinterest. Last July, PEO introduced changes to the requirements for its limited licence. The limited licence is designed for individuals without a bachelor’s degree in engineering who, by virtue of other training and experience (often in engineering technology or natural science), are competent to practise engineering within a defined scope of practice. Those who obtain limited licences under the new requirements are also eligible to be take responsibility for engineering work offered to the public under a Certificate of Authorization. Certified engineering technologist members of the Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists who obtain a limited licence under the new requirements are entitled to use the reserved designation Licensed Engineering Technologist or LET. Engineers and technologists play several crucial roles in manufacturing. The first of these is in product design. Going far beyond the normal design objectives of functionality and ease of use, a well designed product can be manufactured more easily and cheaply, using less energy, with less environmental impact, and with greater reliability and maintainability. Another important role has to do with manufacturing productivity. Modern techniques of industrial engineering, such as lean and Six SigmaTM, are essential to profitability and competitiveness, as is constant innovation in product design and in manufacturing techniques and processes. And finally, there is the matter of worker safety. Those licensed to practise engineering provide leadership to ensure workplaces are both healthy and productive through installing safeguards and eliminating or mitigating hazards. It is regrettable that the Ontario government’s lack of support for engineering licensure in manufacturing has led to the view that anyone can do engineering there. On the contrary, it has never been more critical to the competitiveness of our manufacturing industries to have licensed professionals in key positions of responsibility. A competent industrial engineer can be expected to repay his/her salary many times over in innovation and increased productivity! We should not give up on manufacturing in Ontario. There are many opportunities for Ontario manufacturers to succeed in markets where innovation in product design, manufacturing, productivity, and customer service can outweigh the economies of scale of larger competitors. But there will be no quick fixes. We need to make a longterm commitment to a well thought out industrial strategy.

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    AD{TS4424485} 2 n PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS The North Bay Nugget | Tuesday, January 26, 2016 More than Bricks and Mortar By Roy Slack President of Cementation AS AN ENGINEER there is something very satisfying about travelling past a building or structure that you played a role in engineering and constructing. When you fly into the Sudbury airport, you fly past the Nickel Rim South mine headframes. Nickel Rim South mine is a project the entire Cementation team is very proud of, a complex and challenging, long term project that was completed with no lost time injuries, on time and on budget. My own involvement in the project included some design review, but when it comes to engineering the credit goes to our engineers and designers who developed the concepts and the details of a facility that will form the backbone of Glencore’s Nickel Rim South mine for years to come. Projects like this provide access to needed resources, create jobs, establish a tax base and in general, support our economy. Although economic benefits are important, these projects are also completed with a great deal of attention to the environmental and the social issues that are fundamental to all of us in the North and Near North. Our work with partners, Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nation at the Totten mine and Matachewan First Nation at the Young- Davidson mine, are examples of successful integration of economic development that takes into account the concerns and wellbeing of communities and the land. Environmental stewardship goes hand in hand with any First Nation’s partnership, and on every project we find that we are aligned with our Clients and their desire to preserve the environment and maintain mutually beneficial long term relationships with impacted First Nations peoples. Engineering today is about more than bricks and mortar, it is about people, our future, our environment and our relationship with others. As professional engineers in Ontario, we have a clearly defined duty to society which is to regard the duty to public welfare as paramount. After all is said and done, if the bricks and mortar don’t improve quality of life then we have to re-examine the reason for building in the first place. Protecting the Public Interest. Regulating Professional Engineering. www.peo.on.ca

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    AD{TS4424442} Tuesday, January 26, 2016 | The North Bay Nugget PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS n 3 What is an engineering technician or technologist? By Bob van den Berg ENGINEERING technicians and technologists. Who are these people with two- and three-year college technical diplomas? How do they fit into the concept of the engineering team? Two common questions we hear when interfacing with the public and, yes, even my non-technical friends who still aren’t quite sure what I do. Our engineering brethren know us as the glue that holds the project together, the ones who “make it happen,” as our technical and applied knowledge are utilized to apply technologies and engineering principles in unique ways for the benefit of society. Here are a few examples of great work done by recent recipients of Provincial Honours and Awards recognized at OACETT’s gala in October of last year: Hargurdeep Singh, who co-authored a paper on “Cost Optimization of FDM Additive Manufactured Parts” that was presented at the 2014 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition. Tomasz Bis, who during his 24-year career at National Steel Car as Chief Design Technologist, developed a retractable container stop and guide assembly that became the industry standard. National Steel Car has licensed this technology to various organizations in the transportation industry. Alan Lietz, C.E.T., who as part of a GlobalMedic’s initiative developed a specialized water bucket drilling template. This template increased the efficiency and reduced water loss in their Rainfresh units. His design was instrumental in providing fresh water to the victims of the Nepal Earthquake. Technicians and technologists come from many different backgrounds, but each has a common theme of applying technology in unique ways to “get the job done.” A great number of them, currently 25,000, have also become members of their professional association, the Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT). OACETT members carry the designation of certified engineering technologist (C.E.T.), applied science technologist (A.Sc.T.) or certified technician (C.Tech.). We hold our members to a code of ethics that ensures that they hold the safety, health and welfare of the public paramount and that they maintain proficiency and competence, and advance their personal knowledge within their discipline. To that end, OACETT Council recently approved a mandatory Continuing Professional Development (CPD) initiative that was launched in January 2016. It requires members to participate in applicable activities, seminars and courses that ensure they maintain competence in their chosen discipline. The CPD initiative provides verifiable proof to governments and agencies that our members have the qualifications and up-to-date skills to do the work. CPD is a flexible initiative that enables members, regardless of their discipline or area of practice, to customize their own program that meets their specific needs. It centres on several areas, including technical knowledge, management or leadership training, contributions to the profession, and peer and professional Interaction. A member is required to complete one formal course/ self-directed study and three activities over a three-year cycle to maintain their competence. Trust I’ve given you information now to answer the question when someone asks, “What is an engineering technician or technologist?” We are individuals with extensive technical skills applying engineering technologies in unique and innovative ways. We are engineering professionals who hold each other to a high ethical standard and have an active and robust method, CPD, that ensures our competence.

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    4 n PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS The North Bay Nugget | Tuesday, January 26, 2016 Boart Longyear and North Bay: A Partnership in Global Drilling Innovation By Christopher L. Drenth, P.Eng. Global Engineering Director, Performance Tooling, Boart Longyear BOART LONGYEAR is a leading global supplier of drilling services, drilling equipment and performance tooling for mining and mineral drilling companies globally. It also has a substantial presence in aftermarket parts and service, energy, mine dewatering, oil sands exploration, and production drilling. The Global Drilling Services division operates in 30 countries for a diverse mining customer base spanning a wide range of commodities, including copper, gold, nickel, zinc, uranium, and other metals and minerals. The Global Products division designs, manufactures and sells drilling equipment, performance tooling, and aftermarket parts and services to customers in over 100 countries. Boart Longyear’s market-leading position in the mineral drilling industry is driven by a variety of factors including technological innovation, engineering excellence and advanced manufacturing capabilities. Boart Longyear relies on a combination of patents, trademarks, trade secrets and similar intellectual property rights to protect these technologies and intellectual properties that are instrumental to its Global Products division. As of December 31, 2015, Boart Longyear owns more than 400 issued patents. One of the most significant patents is the RQ™ Quick Decent™ Roller Latch™ The Quick Descent™ Roller Latch head assembly provides faster tripping through fluid, both in dropping and in wireline retraction when drilling declined holes in surface applications. coring drill rod thread design, which withstands significantly greater load stress than all previous designs. Boart Longyear’s North Bay manufacturing facility was instrumental in developing the unique combination of the RQ™ thread design with advanced electric induction thru-wall and case hardening capabilities, and new variable-wall tubing from partnering tubing mills, achieving un-paralleled levels of load strength and wear life in the industry renowned RQ™ V-Wall™ drill rod. With thru-hardened strength, case-hardened wear resistance, lighter weight and larger interior, productivity and drilling depth capacity is significantly increased on any drill rig. To meet the challenges of cutting the hardened alloy steel, and increasing demand for these premium drill rods, North Bay manufacturing engineers & technologists worked with industry-leading tooling suppliers to implement modern, automated production cells with optimized layouts and part transfers. Applying the same manpower, these manufacturing cells provide increased parts per operator, through the use of industrial robots, and increased parts per cutting tool edge, by minimizing cutting edge fail-

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    AD{TS4429187} Tuesday, January 26, 2016 | The North Bay Nugget PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS n 5 ures with new cutting tool substrates and coatings. More recently, further collaboration with tubing mills and the Boart Longyear design engineering team has revealed additional improvement opportunities in both drill rod tubing and joint designs, which are already showing significant performance gains in ‘next generation’ drill rod prototyping. In the 1950’s, Boart Longyear patented the first wireline core retrieval system, the Q® Wireline System. It was an innovation that revolutionized the diamond drilling industry by increasing productivity and making the tripping of core samples from the bottom of the hole safer. The North Bay facility was also instrumental in producing improved generations of patented wireline tooling offerings, including the industry renowned Link Latch™ head assemblies and most recently, the innovative Roller Latch™ head assemblies. The Quick Pump-In™ Roller Latch Head Assembly provides faster tripping in underground applications, and features a holdback brake to retain tooling when drilling inclined holes. The Quick Descent™ Roller Latch Head assembly provides faster tripping through fluid, both in dropping and in wireline retraction when drilling declined holes in surface applications. These products also incorporate hardened alloy steel strength, combined with wear and corrosion resistant surface treatments and engineered control and safety features, delivering significant productivity gains with improved reliability and value. Coring rod continues to be a key product manufactured the Boart Longyear North Bay plant. As other producers have moved their rod production off shore, Boart Longyear has remained competitive through technological improvements. Working with industryleading tooling suppliers, engineers at the North Bay facility have increased manufacturing capacity through reduced cycle times and new automated production cells. North Bay has also implemented new tooling materials and coatings to optimize consistency and quality when cutting heat treated alloy steel. These advances combined with the latest in robotics and automation allow each new rod cell to produce more rods per shift with the same manpower, keeping Boart Longyear North Bay at the forefront of the industry. Looking forward, the collaboration between Boart Longyear engineering and industry partners will continue to reveal additional improvement opportunities. The ‘next generation’ of Boart Longyear drill rod is already showing significant performance gains. Similarly, recent market introductions of Roller Latch™ wireline tooling rely on advanced manufacturing capabilities for their success. The Quick Pump-In™ Roller Latch head assembly provides faster tripping in underground applications and features a holdback brake to retain tooling when drilling inclined holes. The Quick Descent™ Roller Latch head assembly provides faster tripping through fluid, both in dropping and in wireline retraction when drilling declined holes in surface applications. The precision features required for these functions rely on heat treated alloy steel and wear and corrosion resistant surface treatments to provide consistency and reliability needed. Boart Longyear’s Q® Wireline System In the 1950’s, Boart Longyear patented the first wireline core retrieval system, the Q® Wireline System. It was an innovation that revolutionized the diamond drilling industry by increasing productivity and making the tripping of core samples from the bottom of the hole safer. ADDING VALUE. DELIVERING RESULTS. Engineering and Environmental Solutions Mining | Power | Water Resources | Environment www.knightpiesold.com

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    AD{TS4424375} Presenting 6 n PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS The North Bay Nugget | Tuesday, January 26, 2016 Five Registered Professional Engineers Adebunmi Olusanya, P. Eng. Adebunmi Olusanya graduated from the University of Lagos, Nigeria in 1999 with an honors (B.Sc.) degree in Building Engineering. After graduation, she worked briefly with a municipal government before proceeding to the United Kingdom in 2001 for her postgraduate studies. Adebunmi completed her postgraduate studies in Construction Project Management at the London South Bank University, United Kingdom and obtained her Master’s (M.Sc.) degree in 2003. She worked for various private and governmental organizations in London UK, including W.A.B Associates, London Borough of Camden, London Borough of Islington and Carillion Services Limited before relocating to Canada in December 2003. Adebunmi joined the Ministry of Transportation, Ontario in September 2009 where she presently works as a Senior Designer, dealing with the design aspects of provincial highway networks in the Northeast Region of the Province. Adebunmi presently lives in North Bay with her husband and two children, and she always enjoys a time out with her family. Jean Marie Ndoreraha, P.Eng. My names are Jean Marie Ndoreraha I am resident of North Bay but originally from Burundi, East Africa. In 2011, I graduated with Bachelor degree in Mining Engineering from Laurentian University located in Sudbury, Ontario. I started working for De beers Canada as an intern in 2008. It is in 2011 after graduation that I started working for Goldcorp as Engineer In Training until late 2013. Since then, I work as mine production Engineer at Young Davidson Mine owned by Alamosgold Inc. Jessica Sheppard, P. Eng. Jessica Sheppard is a proud mother of five wonderful children, and a northerner, who grew up in the local area. She completed high school at St. Joseph Scollard Hall, before completing Environmental Engineering with a Chemical Specialization at the University of Waterloo. Jessica has had many opportunities to work throughout Ontario and even in the Northwest Territories; before moving back to the area and taking on her current role as Coordinator of Environment and Aggregates at Pioneer Construction. She is married to her cherished husband and best friend Daryl Sheppard, and in her spare time between working, homeschooling, being a mom, wife and volunteering in faith ministry! Jessica enjoys a multitude of musical and artistic pursuits, traveling and outdoor adventuring. Life to this point has been stuffed full; and with her faith and family, Jessica looks forward to the new adventures to come. Michael Martin, P.Eng. Michael was born in Goose Bay, Labrador, then lived in Gander, Newfoundland. Growing up in 2 airport towns, and traveling to visit family in remote Labrador and Nova Scotia, encouraged his interests in aviation. He moved to Ottawa to pursue a Degree in Aerospace Engineering from Carleton University, graduating in 2007. He complemented his interest in aviation by obtaining his Pilot’s Private License. He then completed a Masters of Applied Science (Aerospace) in 2011, from Carleton University. Voyageur Airways welcomed Michael to North Bay in 2009, and has since been an active aerospace engineer, designing aircraft modifications and repairs. Naadia Carrier, P.Eng. Naadia Carrier graduated from Laurentian University in 2011 from the Mechanical Engineering program. She then went on to work for Stantec in North Bay on a variety of mining projects. She has worked on the design of mechanical systems including ventilation, dust collection, mine dewatering, and conveying systems. Her time at Stantec also included a secondment to a potash mine in Saskatchewan where she worked with the capitol projects team. She is currently on maternity leave and looking forward to returning to work as a licensed engineer. Congratulations “The North Bay Chapter of Professional Engineers Ontario would like to congratulate the Engineers who have successfully obtained their designations in 2015” The license represents a sustained commitment by each to satisfy academic and experience requirements prescribed by PEO to assure that the Ontario public is well served. Licensed professional engineers are graduates of an accredited engineering program at a Canadian University or have obtained equivalent credits at a foreign institution. Each has served a minimum of four years in an internship role where the work experiences with licensed professional engineers and successful completion of PEO’s professional practice and ethics exams reinforced their capability to serve the public. Good luck in all your current and future endeavours.

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    AD{TS4428691} Tuesday, January 26, 2016 | The North Bay Nugget 450 members and counting… IN 1922, the provincial legislature passed an act to establish the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario (APEA). Subsequent revisions to the act with the latest being in May 1, 1984. At that time, under Bill 123, a new professional Engineers’ Act, including regulations and bylaws, was proclaimed and the Chapters’ role and function were defined under Bylaw No. 1. In an effort to improve communications between the members and the council of the association, the members approved a chapter program by a referendum held in 1960. By the end of 1961, 31 chapters had been established. Shortly after this in 1963, the North Bay chapter was organized. Through communications between the APEO and then city engineer Jack Reid, a meeting was convened between John Gage, Murray McLean, Bill McCann and John Maxted to consider organizing a chapter. The new chapter’s constitution was approved Oct. 11, 1963, and John O. Gage, P.Eng., plant manager of Dupont (now ETI Explosives) was elected as the first chapter chairman. The North Bay Region chapter extends from Hagar to Mattawa, west to east, and from Temagami to Novar, north to south, and includes a sum total of 450 Professional Engineers and graduate Engineering Interns registered with PEO. The aims and objectives of the chapters are to provide a forum to: • Ensure communication between the Council of the Professional Engineers Ontario and its local members. • Provide a forum for local discussion. • Actively encourage the participation of women in the engineering profession. • Establish community service activities on behalf of the engineering profession. • Promote public awareness of the engineering profession in the local community. • Advance the status and professional welfare of the members. • Enhance the professional development of the members. • Provide input to council and regional congress on assigned projects. It achieves this through regular executive meetings, monthly member activities, participation in regional (Northern) congress meetings as well as PEO council, staff and other chapter leaders across the province. The chapter meets monthly to review activities which include: member service—personalizing the engineers’ link to the profession; programs such as Engineers Day; student outreach in support of students understanding of science and technology; community service events in support of local charities; PEO and Ontario Society Professional Engineers initiatives. OPG is a proud partner in many community and environmental programs and initiatives across Ontario. And with 99.7 per cent of the power we produce free of smog and greenhouse gas-causing emissions, we are just as dedicated to making Ontario a cleaner and even better place to live, work and play. @opg PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS n 7 NORTH BAY CHAPTER CHAIRS 1963-64 John O. Gage 1964-65 Murray D. McLean 1965-66 John J. Maxted 1966067 Geroge A. Payne 1967-68 Arthur L. Braund 1968-69 Steve Shisko 1969-70 Charlie Olmsted 1970-71 Don Haws 1971-72 Morley Daiter 1972-73 David Robinson 1973-74 Walter Zaichkowski 1974-75 Gord Patterson 1975-76 Dick Henderson 1976-77 John Banerji 1977-78 Jim Callan 1978-79 Stan O’Shea 1979-80 Gord Addison 1980-81 Brendan MacKinnon 1981-82 Ken Wright, Brendan MacKinnon 1982-83 Warren Turnbull 1983-84 David Richards 1984-85 Bill Bryant 1985-86 Rick Savage 1986-87 Moni Khowessah 1987-88 Gerry Strachen 1988-89 Ken Williams 1989-90 Karl Dittmann 1990-91 Tom Etches 1991 -92 John Severino 1992-93 Ray Mantha 1993-94 Mark Kelly 1994-95 Rob Bedford 1995-96 Tom Pepper 1996-97 Vatche Minassian 1997-98 Brian Kelly 1998-99 Dinno Cicci 1999-01 Mel Harju 2001-03 David Robinson 2003-05 David Euler 2005-06 Alan Korell 2006-07 Douglas Luckett 2007- 08 Mike Pearsall 2008-09 Scott Murray 2009-10 John Simmonds 2010-11 Wilson Muir 2011-12 Tom Krajci 2012-14 Luc Roberge 2014-15 Michael Blair 2015- 16 Karin Pratte

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    AD{TS4424421} 8 n PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS The North Bay Nugget | Tuesday, January 26, 2016 A different kind of Toolbox By Evan Butler-Jones KEEPING UP-TO-DATE with technology in today’s business world is a constant challenge. When it comes to technologies for manufacturing, the costly effort to keep on top of new developments is often overruled by day-today concerns. Though we all hear about the “growth of technology”, including 3D printing, robotics, and other computer-based tools, these things often seem far away from our daily work. Even those companies who have invested in modern software, robotics, or other tools to improve their competitiveness know better than most the time, costs, and risk involved in making the change. This is not just a Northern Ontario problem, but one experienced by manufacturers in Southern Ontario, and across the country. Like any complex problem, there isn’t one single solution. However, Canadore College is working hard to provide Northern Ontario-based companies with at least part of the answer. Canadore’s ICAMP - the Innovation Centre for Advanced Manufacturing and Production – turned two years old this autumn, and is quickly becoming recognized as an important tool in the manufacturer’s innovation toolbox. ICAMP provides local companies with access to a wide range of manufacturing technologies and a team of engineers, technologists, and tradespeople to support them. Though ICAMP was started in partnership with a group of local interested businesses, companies do not have to be members or partners to access the centre. Demonstrating this, the 200+ projects that the ICAMP team has completed over its two year history have been divided among more than 50 different companies. These projects have ranged from testing new manufacturing processes to completing full-scale six-month long research and development projects. The technologies used in these projects include 3D printing, robotics, computercontrolled machining, and many others. Building on the overwhelming response that industry has given the ICAMP facility, Canadore College is currently in expansion mode, having added new staff and technology, including the showpiece of the upgraded facility, a 3D printer capable of making completely functional parts out of a variety of metals. When online, this will be another first for Northern Ontario, and fully accessible to all businesses in the area. To book a tour of the facility or inquire into the available services at ICAMP, please contact Evan Butler-Jones at evan.butler-jones@ canadorecollege.ca. Global Drilling Products © Copyright 2016 Boart Longyear. All rights reserved.

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    Tuesday, January 26, 2016 | The North Bay Nugget Englobe Corp: Offering world-class advice, engineering solutions through durable and cost effective services ESTABLISHED in 1961, Englobe Corp. (Englobe) is one of the largest Environmental, Geotechnical, and Materials Testing Firms in Canada. The mission of Englobe is to assist our clients and contribute to their success throughout their project’s life cycle, by applying our practical experiences and advanced expertise for the aspects of environmental, geotechnical, and materials engineering. Englobe started as a laboratory located in Quebec in 1961 (previously known as Les Laboratoires Ville Marie (LVM)), specializing in soil analysis, geotechnical engineering and materials testing services. Currently, Englobe is a national leader in environmental, geotechnical, pavement and materials engineering, and building science (building envelope/ roofing) services, and performs site investigations, field inspection, insitu and laboratory testing, analyses, assessments, supervision and monitoring of the work. Englobe operates 53 offices across the country with more than 1,600 full-time employees nationwide, which include Professional Engineers, Professional Geologists, environmental scientists, geoscientists, technicians, technologists, laboratory staff, and administrative support staff. Locally in North Bay, our office was established in 1982 as Merlex Engineering Limited, completing geotechnical and geo-environmental engineering, construction inspection and quality control offering services to various clients in both the private and the public sectors. The firm’s professional experience is directly related to the site investigation and engineering analyses of both natural and man made ground conditions (both soil and rock) and the groundwater conditions that exist within Northern Ontario. Our North Bay team specializes in carrying out projects for the Northern Region of MTO offering engineering services in the foundation engineering design, pavement design, field drilling services for foundation and pavement design, coring services for the concrete and the bedrock plus the field and laboratory quality control for concrete and aggregates certified by MTO and CCIL, respectively. These fields of professional engineering are providing services that enhance our daily lives and provide solutions to challenges we are facing now and in future generations. Our Project Management is based on the highest-quality standards, compliance with governing laws and regulations, innovation, development, and use of new technologies to ensure cost effectiveness, and continual implementation and improvement of our processes to ensure client satisfaction. The North Bay Englobe office is proud to have provided geotechnical and environmental services to the manufacturing sector as they developed new facilities in the North Bay area. We look forward to continuing working with our manufacturing clients as they continue to grow and as North Bay continues to attract new industries. More and more projects are being started in fall or early winter, and ground works are being undertaken throughout the winter months. Carrying out construction in the winter months poses significant engineering challenges, as freezing temperatures can affect groundwater, founding subgrades, backfilling operations, and construction materials such as concrete, grouts, and mortars. Frost heaving and adfreeze can result in significant differential settlement of founding soils and damage to structures placed in the winter that are not properly protected. Winter construction will often result in delays to construction schedules and increased costs of the project. Englobe has been involved with many winter construction projects during which we work closely with the Contractor allows the projects to be completed to the Clients requirements and schedule, while ensuring the engineering standards are met. We would also like to note that a recent change will affect the engineering community in the North Bay area. The Ministry of Transportation Ontario (MTO) has announced that exceptions to the latest Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code (CHBDC) CSA S6-14 have been implemented on January 1, 2016. Among the exceptions, seismic requirements are currently being updated. Previously, the seismic requirements of CHBDC were mostly based on a return period of 475 years (10% in 50 years of exceedance probability) stated in previous versions of CSA S6. Based on the latest requirements stated the structural design of bridges PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS n 9 as well as liquefaction of the foundation soils shall be carried out on the basis of the site coefficients and the site-specific Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) estimated by a return period of 2,475 years (2% in 50 years of exceedance probability). Accordingly, principles of undertaking Performance-based design, Force-based design and Soilfoundation-structure Interaction are applicable to CSA S6-14. These seismic requirements are also applicable for the purposes of design of Buried Structures, Concrete Structures, Steel Structures and Rehabilitation and Repair (Sections 7, 8, 10, and 15 in CSA S6-14, respectively). With the changes, new requirements of Consequence and Site Understanding Classification and Geotechnical Resistance are applicable for Section 6 Foundations and Geotechnical Systems in CSA S6-14. With our expertise in geotechnical earthquake engineering our Clients can be confident that their project will meet current code requirements. We are proud to be a member of the team on so many new and exciting projects in Northern Ontario. Englobe would like to thank our Clients for their patronage and we look forward to working with both new and past clients in the New Year. We wish everyone great prosperity in 2016 and invite you to visit our website at www.englobecorp.com.

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    AD{TS4424154} 10 n PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS The North Bay Nugget | Tuesday, January 26, 2016 Autodesk By Marc Sauro DISRUPTIVE trends are accelerating and are providing both established and startup companies with new ways to design and produce their products and create related services. They are also making it dramatically harder to sustain competitive advantage. Products are becoming more intelligent, customer expectations are increasing and new production technologies are expanding. At Autodesk we call this the Future of Making Things. Here are some great examples that reflect this shift: “MARKETS OF ONE” Mass personalization will march toward the mainstream Normal allows its customers to take a few pictures of their ears and uses that to create personalized 3D printed headphones that fit perfectly in your ear. Normal CEO Nikki Kaufman describes it best as “Personalized, customized products built for you and your body.” In the last few years, we’ve seen companies that offer customers the ability to customize their products, by allowing customers to select from pre-defined options. Diego Tamburini, Manufacturing Industry Strategist at Autodesk predicts that customers will demand products that are uniquely tailored to their needs, tastes and bodies. DIGITAL CITIES Big data will inform our urban landscapes The design and construction of buildings, infrastructure and the cities they reside in are far too complex to rely on the wooden scale models of old. Architects, engineers and city planners are able to do things that were not possible in the past. As Phil Bernstein, V.P. Strategic Industry Relations at Autodesk put it, “Scale models, however beautifully made, are hardly up to the job of understanding how a building operates in the context of a city.” Thanks to advances in laser scanning, sensors and cloud-based software, cities are now being digitized into 3D models that can be viewed from every angle, changed and analyzed at a moment’s notice. Cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, Singapore, Tokyo and Boston are working to digitize not just the shapes and locations of the buildings but create a datarich, living model of the city itself — complete with simulated pedestrian traffic, energy use, carbon footprint, water distribution, transportation, even the movement of infectious diseases. GENERATIVE DESIGN Designs will “grow” When Lightning Motorcycles wanted to develop a next generation swing arm for their electric motorcycle, they adopted a new Autodesk approach for the project: A computer-aided (CAD) system called Project Dreamcatcher that automatically generates tens, hundreds, or even thousands of designs that all meet your specific design criteria. Software like Autodesk’s Project Dreamcatcher is ushering a new era of design best described by Autodesk CTO Jeff Kowalski, “We’ll start to see more intensely complex forms that could appear very organic or very mathematic.” AUGMENTED REALITY MEETS DESIGN Virtual and augmented reality will be integrated into everyday applications. New virtual devices like the Oculus Rift and augmented reality applications will require an innovative generation of spatial designers. According to Autodesk Technology Futurist Jordan Brandt, current touch screen interaction will give way to ‘Immersion Design’ that leverages the spatial dimensions offered through emerging augmented and virtual reality platforms. There’s a bright future for architecture students, game designers and multidimensional talent to join app development teams. 3D DATA EXPLOSION The amount of 3D data will rapidly increase due to the proliferation of reality capture and new web technologies “With the ability to create 3D models on mobile devices through apps like 123D Catch or the Structure sensor, virtually anyone can begin to capture the spatial world around them. Coupled with the broader adoption of WebGL technology and 3D printing, we can expect an explosion in the amount of 3D data available. Responding to user demand, social platforms will enable direct sharing of 3D data and start to provide immersive, collaborative experiences.” — Autodesk Technology Futurist, Jordan Brandt Join us at the 46th Annual Engineers Day Symposium sponsored by the North Bay Chapter of Professional Engineers of Ontario and learn how Autodesk is committed to delivering the most advanced design tools for the future of making things. 101 Worthington Street East, Suite 204 North Bay, Ontario P1B 1G5 Phone: (705) 474-7000 Fax: (705) 474-7362 akdg@akdg.ca 109 Elm Street Sudbury, Ontario P3C 1T4 Phone: (705) 674-7500 Fax: (705) 674-7501 Established in 1993 Anrep Krieg Desilets Gravelle Ltd. is a multi-discipline firm providing Mechanical, Electrical, Civil and Structural Engineering services, testing and commissioning, building science, heritage preservation and rehabilitation, and design-build services. Additional services: building and system evaluations for reserve fund studies and technical audits. Our firm specializes in serving Northern Ontario which is demonstrated by the widespread locations of our projects.

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