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Business London Magazine | October2017
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    business LONDON 2nd generation Creative Perspective 3rd generation Corporate Organization 5th generation Passion and Commitment 3rd generation Modern Marketing 4th generation Branding it Forward Family business What the next generation can bring to the table Page 18 Rising interest rates. Can businesses handle the impact? Page 12 OCTOBER 2017 $2.95 PM40064683 businesslondon.ca The city’s booming film industry Page 14 Modernize your recruiting strategy Page 8

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    The wagon, redefined. Some view the wagon as a functional necessity. At Mercedes-Benz, we see it as a design opportunity. The new C-Class Wagon features fluid, unbroken lines from front to rear, signalling both the spaciousness and refinement that await within. Underneath it all are the same technologies that have made the C-Class a benchmark for performance and innovation in its category. Proving beyond a doubt that practicality doesn’t have to come at the expense of driving passion. © 2017 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. Mercedes-Benz London I 35 Southdale Road East I 866-879-0768 I info@mblondon.com

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    London Lawyers’ Leadership Challenge London Law Firms team up for the 3rd Annual Lawyer Leadership Challenge This year, eight generous law firms are partnering together again with a common goal to fuel significant change for children, families and individuals in London & Middlesex County by providing vital, local community programs to those who need it most, when they need it most. The Lawyer Leadership Challenge kicks off on Thursday October 12, 2017 at the Boys and Girls Club at 4pm. Sincere thanks to our generous Community Champions and the eight participating Law Firms for leading by example, and helping to build a community where everyone matters.

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    INSIDE 6 10 16 24 From the Editor’s desk Meet Mike McColl He’s a second generation stock car builder 20 Seconds with Family business Forest City Windows and Doors Don’t mess with Bruce Especially on the topic of small business tax reform 40 Break Time Andrea Cox grabs a seat at Icarus Restobar 28 36 38 42 20 Leadership lessons Secrets to surviving the family business Business Meets The places you need to be On the books ‘The Way It Is’ written by James King The Broad Perspective Conversation for change The Voice October 2017 Volume 18: Issue 12 business LONDON Publisher: Lisa Catania 519.667.5480 lcatania@postmedia.com Managing Editor: Lisa Bucher 519.471.2907 x 540281 lbucher@postmedia.com Sales Manager: Linda Leblanc 519.673.5005 x 516200 lleblanc@postmedia.com Media Sales Consultant: Mackenzie Guindon 519.673.5005 x 540255 mguindon@postmedia.com Business London is published monthly at 369 York St., London, ON N6A 4G1 12,000 copies distributed to businesses in the London/St. Thomas area, including members of the London Chamber of Commerce. Subscriptions: $24 for one year, $37.50 for two, $45 for three (GST included). USA $60 per year (Canadian funds). Reproduction in whole or in part of the editorial or advertising content is forbidden without the written consent of the publisher. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064683 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Business London 369 York St., London, ON N6A 4G1 ISSN 1493-0579 4 | businesslondon.ca | OCTOBER 2017

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    UNIQUE AS YOU #SweetSiftonSuites MARCH YOUR MOJO… To the Monday jam session. To the big open kitchen. To your favourite organic market down the block. Forget basic, you’re the real deal. Let your personal brand take on a life of its own, in a home of its own. Now that’s suite. Custom Suites I Open Social Spaces I Experienced Partner Downtown Locations Cafés & Restaurants Retail Stores Underground Parking 519.434.1000 Sifton.com BIG VIKING GAMES 285 King Street

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    business LONDON Editor’s Note Generational business From expert tips to profiles, we’ve packed this issue with valuable family business information What do a tulip bulb and a TAG Heuer watch have in common? Not a lot. However, Heeman’s Garden Centre and Nash Jewellers, two London-based familyowned retailers that sell them, share some similar strategies to long-term success. This month, we set out to explore family businesses that have managed to survive over multiple generations. Eighty per cent of Canadian businesses are family-owned and contribute around 60 per cent of the country’s GDP. Yet few survive the transition to the next generation. Family businesses come with a unique set of challenges from family squabbles to lack of proper succession plans. In fact, only 20 per cent of Canadian family businesses have proper succession plans. According to Bill Brushett, president and CEO of Family Enterprise Xchange succession plans for family business often don’t go well or fail. The difference between success and failure is in the approach to planning (pages 18-19). The Boston-based Family Firm Institute states some sobering facts - one-third of family businesses last into a second generation, while 12 per cent survive into a third generation, and three per cent carry through to a fourth generation or beyond. That would make successful fifth generation businesses, such as London’s Hayman Construction, rare. So how do they do it? How did they avoid the well-trodden path to failure? Why did they succeed and so many others fail? Browse through pages 18 to 22 to learn more. On page 10 you might be surprised to learn that race cars are built here in London and for drivers around the world. We gave the story some space in this issue - a profile on McColl Racing, a second generation family business. Andrea Cox grabs a seat at Icarus Restobar to chat with Zack Agathos, a third generation local restauranteur, flip to page 40. Not every article in this issue is about family business. See our new human resource column on page 8 to learn how to attract more talent with technology. Speaking about new sections, have you seen our new back page? We’ve also got an interview with former CBC Dragon’s Den investor Bruce Coxon, on the topic of small business tax reform (page 24). Let’s just say; he’s not a fan! Can’t find what you want to read? Contact us or pitch us a story idea. It may become a feature article or a new section. In the meantime, happy reading. Lisa Bucher lbucher@postmedia.com New to our team Business London Magazine and Postmedia are pleased to welcome Mackenzie Guindon, Media Sales Consultant, to the team! Mackenzie has a passion for building relationships and thrives on gaining you the results you seek from your marketing investment. She would love to learn more about your business and can be reached at mguindon@postmedia.com or 226-385-9084. 6 | businesslondon.ca | OCTOBER 2017

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    DYNAMIC KITCHENS Advertorial Custom Cabinetry and Intelligent Designs to Suit Your Style By Karen Paton-Evans Having already checked out four cabinetry companies, Jeff Edmunds was still hunting when he happened to drive past a Dynamic Kitchens van. Back at his Byron split level house, he visited www.dynamickitchens.ca and was impressed by photos of actual projects and clients’ glowing reviews. Edmunds arranged a no-obligation, in-home consultation. He explained to Shelley Pelc, Dynamic Kitchens’ vice president, co-owner and designer, his concept to amalgamate the separate kitchen, dining and living rooms into one big great room. “Shelley showed me why my original vision wouldn’t work and recommended flipping the location of the kitchen into what was, at that time, the dining area,” says Edmunds. The new open concept plan maximized square footage to better suit the client’s lifestyle. Armed with a workable concept, Edmunds toured Dynamic Kitchens’ factory and showroom at 4094 Eastgate Cres. in London. Examining the cabinetry and walking through the kitchen displays, “I was amazed at the quality of work,” he says. “I’m a single guy. Designing a kitchen is stressful. I appreciated being able to see all the options.” “Shelley was honest in telling me when something I thought would look good would not,” Edmunds chuckles. “She was fabulous, explaining to me exactly what to expect. There were no hidden agendas.” Mindful of the budget, Shelley made every dollar count. Once the design was finalized and the custom cabinetry and other components were fabricated, Dynamic Kitchens’ installation team arrived to transform Edmunds’ kitchen. “I had no trouble walking away and letting them get on with the job,” the homeowner says. “The two-day installation was seamless. They cleaned up their mess. Everything was fantastic.” Today, when guests step into the new great room, Edmunds says, “They are blown away by the difference.” In the beautiful and functional 600 square feet of living space, all eyes are drawn to the transitional white cabinetry, accented with dark hardware and offset by a big island crafted of deep brown stained hickory. Black swirl granite countertops are complemented by the finely striped grey marble subway tiled backsplash. Above the island is a custom light box, made of dark stained hickory with a painted border to match the kitchen perimeter. The light box feature is illuminated by three pendant lights and four LED puck lights. “I wanted the kitchen to be timeless,” says Edmunds. “It definitely has that wow factor.” Waiting to find the right custom kitchen designer and manufacturer paid off for Edmunds. “They are what they say they are: Dynamic Kitchens,” he says. “They are attentive to what you want and will give you the experience of a lifetime.” Quality Custom Cabinetry Since 1975 dynamickitchens.ca I 519-652-5091 Dynamic Kitchens...for Dynamic Lives

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    Deborah Ward PEOPLE MATTER Fresh Ideas. Better HR. How to win at recruiting If you want to attract more talent, consider technology ATTRACTING TALENT IS a source of angst for many employers. The ‘post and pray’ method doesn’t serve companies well and, in fact, can eliminate a significant portion of the talent pool who aren’t interested in slogging through job boards. There are two areas that businesses should consider when looking to attract new talent; its website’s career page and social recruiting. Career Page Most people considering a position with a company will visit its website and more specifically its career page. So a company’s page should include the following: A clear description of company culture, values and ethics. A compelling mission is more relevant than ever to job seekers. What benefits and perks does the business offer? People incur medical, dental and insurance expenses and want to know what support an employer will provide for them and their families. What career opportunities are available? This is an area where companies can exercise some creativity. Consider grabbing job seekers’ attention by posting videos to describe aviable positions. Ease of connecting. Is the business still asking job candidates to complete a profile and/or set up an account into the company’s HRIS recruitment module? Do candidates still have to complete an online application as well as upload a cover letter and/or resume? Cumbersome processes will alienate many qualified people. Why not ditch the resume and online applications and consider technology to enable people to experience a digital interview from anywhere, at any time. Employee testimonials, specifically, authentic videos of staff is a company’s most powerful advocates. Let them tell potential employees why they should choose this company. Attracting talent to London and surrounding areas is challenging so any information about the community the business is located in will help entice the candidate. Don’t forget to include links that provide further details about living in London, or engage with a community concierge who will offer new team member a fully guided city onboarding experience ensuring a smooth transition for out of towners (www.citymatch.ca). Social Recruiting LinkedIn is still the popular professional social network. Keep the business’s page up-to-date. Share relevant articles, and encourage employee interaction on the page. Facebook and Twitter are great platforms to showcase a company and allow communication with interested candidates. More people are connecting with companies through these channels. Instagram, Pinterest and Snapchat accounts are being used to showcase business culture and personality. These platforms are about eye-catching pictures and sharing recent or real-time updates about what’s happening. Choosing social media will depend entirely on the business. Maintaining social media channels in terms of content and response is critical to success. Don’t have the internal resources to do so? Consider hiring a social media professional to manage these channels and help connect potential recruits. Just as a clear description of a business is vital to a career page, the same goes for social media presence. Ensure posts align with the company’s mission and values. Avoid sharing irrelevant content, as this may confuse candidates on what the business is about. Attracting talent is as critical to your business as attracting customers. Ensure you have an effective strategy, and adequate resources focused on all the elements of finding the people you need to grow your business. ~ BL 8 | businesslondon.ca | OCTOBER 2017

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    AD{TS5400544} LEGAL MOMENT Canasurrogate or biological material donorberesponsible forthe childinthe future? 1. When someoneactsasasurrogate by means of either carrying ababyordonatingbiological material forartificial insemination, they cannot be heldliable or responsiblefor thechild in thefuture. 2. As thesurrogate cannot be held responsiblefor the childinthe future,converselytheyhavenoclaim or rights in regardstothe childinthe future either. 3. When entering into asurrogacyordonor relationship, firstasurrogacyordonor agreementwill be drafted and signed. Ideallythisisdonebefore theembryoiscreated. 4. After thechild is born,adeclarationofparentage is signedwhich ensuresthe intended parentsare legally seen as such. •BorninHamilton ABOUTKIM •Earnedher lawdegreeatthe University of WesternOntario •Called to thebar in 2002 •Has 2children •Enjoysrunning KimDoucett Kimberly practisesexclusively in theareaoffamilylaw andhas extensive experience negotiatingand litigating in theinterests of herclients. London Kitchener Sarnia Chatham 519-672-9330 226-476-4444 519-344-2020 226-494-1034 www.CohenHighley.com

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    Up to speed? Mike McColl has never gotten a ticket, but he knows speed BY WAYNE NEWTON IT MIGHT SURPRISE some people to discover stock cars are made in London by a second-generation builder. McColl Racing is the name, and it’s wellknown in the Canadian motorsports community. The company assembles approximately 20 sports cars a year costing up to $100,000 per vehicle. Among his customers is Canada’s well-known stock car driver, D.J. Kennington of St. Thomas, for whom McColl has built at least eight cars including the Dodge Challenger Kennington races in the highly-competitive NASCAR Pinty’s series. McColl’s father, Burt, started the company in Wheatley as a hobby while working for Union Gas. Burt’s passion for racing soon infected Mike and his two other sons. It was after working in the electronics industry that Mike decided to work for McColl Racing. Eventually, he took the helm and relocated it first to St. Thomas. Then fifteen years ago he brought the business to London. McColl’s is now on its second London location, an approximately 12,000-sq.-ft. space at 80 Bessemer Rd. He has a team of 14 employees, which includes his two brothers, together they build and repair race cars and sell high-performance car parts. McColl cars are raced on some of Ontario’s major tracks, but also on the NASCAR Euro circuit. While most of its performance parts are imported from the United States, completed cars are rarely sold to American buyers because of the highpriced duty. McColl Racing’s repair, service, and retail parts season start in May and ends in October. New cars, from entry-level four-cylinder cars which compete at highway speeds to premiere class beasts which race at 130 mph at Jukasa, are built from October to May. “In the summer, I get to as many tracks and series as possible,” McColl said. “We work with crew members, more as consultants, on setups to get the most out of the cars. “I enjoy working with the driver, the car, the crew to improve the speed.” During the week, the McColl shop is lined with cars in need of TLC after weekend races. “Most times, the price of repairs is less than building a new car,” McColl said. Driver safety features have been the greatest advancement since he first started building cars in the 80s, McColl said. Still, the role of race car driver is one he’s always wanted to leave to someone else. He’s driven one of his cars on a track once when he did two laps near Ottawa. “I missed my spot to stop,” McColl said. “They asked what I thought, and I said, ‘it was very noisy, very rough, and it doesn’t stop. The driver said, ‘I’ve been telling you that.’” He had a quieter, smoother ride when he took his 2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS V8 for a spin at Delaware Speedway. As McColl Racing grew, he recruited skilled employees from the racing community, people with a passion for the sport. Two of his newest staff members have post-secondary auto courses. Longer term employees took a different route. “They have racing backgrounds,” McColl said of his staff, “either as crew or drivers. They’re here because of their passion for and love for racing.” Like Mike. ~BL Risky Business Building a race car and competing on the oval has a lot in common with running a small business. Success isn’t just about the driver, despite being the focus. It takes a team of diverse skills, McColl said and being willing to take calculated risks. 10 | businesslondon.ca | OCTOBER 2017 Mike McColl PHOTO: GEOFF ROBINS “Like any well-oiled machine, it all has to work together to have a successful race,” McColl said. “Like a small business.”

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