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Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruits
Newspapers | Community / Lifestyle / Health 2017-08-23 15:35:29
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    a special FEATURE section • THURSday, AUGUST 24, 2017 CHOOSE TO BOOST They keep you healthy and strong! My favourite vegetable is carrots! Me too, they taste great!

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    2 I Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 Healthy Kids Community Challenge (HKCC) HKCC is a province-wide initiative funded by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (MOHLTC) intended to create sustainable improvements for children and youth in three theme areas: healthy eating, healthy physical activity, and healthy lifestyle for children and youth. The City of London is one of 45 Ontario municipalities receiving HKCC funding and uses the funds to enhance the impact of London’s Child & Youth Network (CYN), whose goals and aims closely align with the objectives of HKCC. The current theme for HKCC is “Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit”. The focus of this theme is to encourage kids and families to make vegetables and fruit a part of every meal and snack. Below you will find some information provided by HKCC, on the benefits vegetables and fruit as well as tips to incorporate them throughout the day at every snack and meal time. Why choose to boost veggies and fruit? Vegetables and fruit contain many nutrients that protect our health and fuel our bodies. Nutrients provided by vegetables and fruit include carbohydrates, vitamins A and C, potassium, magnesium, and some B vitamins such as folate. Do you wonder what one serving of vegetables or fruit actually looks like? 1 ear of corn, 4 florets of brocoli or cauliflower, 1 large carrot or 6 spears of asparagus 1 cup of raw leafy greens such as lettuce, kale or spinach Here are some helpful tips, to help you get the recommended amount! 1/2 cup of cooked fresh, frozen or canned vegetables such as beans, carrots, okra, bitter melon, bok choi or squash or ½ cup of tomato or tomato sauce 1 medium piece of fruit such as apple, peach, pear or banana 20 cherries or grapes, 1/2 cup of fresh or frozen berries, melon, mango mango or plantain In this issue you will find… J Fun facts about veggies and fruit J Tips to include veggies and fruit into every snack and meal J Information on what’s in season! J Games and activities the whole family can do together J Learn about programs that are promoting veggies and fruit throughout London J Recipes, gardening tips, information on food programs and so much more! Fresh, frozen, canned or dried? Frozen and canned vegetables are generally as nutritious as fresh. They can be an affordable way to get the recommended daily servings. Dried fruit is a nutritious choice. Look for varieties with no added sugar and salt. A food guide serving of dried fruit is 60 mL, (¼ cup). Look for frozen, canned, and dried vegetables or fruit without any added salt or sugar. FRUIT JUICE FRESH FRUIT How many teaspoons of sugar in each? Recommended Number of Servings per Day 100% ORANGE JUICE (250ml) 1 FRESH ORANGE (small) Age in Years 2-3 4-8 9-13 14-18 19+ UNSWEETENED APPLE JUICE (250ml) 1 FRESH APPLE (small) Real fruit provides an important source of fiber. Source: Health Canada, Canadian Nutrient File http://webprod3.hc-sc.gc.ca/cnf-fce/index-eng.jsp Number of Vegetable and Fruit Servings Number of Water Servings (cups) 4 5 6 7-8 8-10 5 7 9 9-12 11-14

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    Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 I 3 B st the Fruit Veggies and in your child’s diet Many parents confront the daily struggle of getting a picky eater to consume a healthy diet which includes various fruit and vegetables. Although children should not be forced to eat, here are some tips and tricks to encourage them to eat healthy. Take your child grocery shopping with you. This can be a daunting task for many families, so if this is the case for you and your child, then just make it a quick visit to pick up a few items that your child gets to pick out. Have him/her select one produce item that they know and like and one that they have never tried before. Allow your child to help in menu planning and in the preparation of snacks/meals in the kitchen. With supervision, your child will be able to cut up fruit and vegetables, measure and mix ingredients together, create plate presentation, and lots more. When children help in the kitchen, they are not only developing basic kitchen skills, but will also further develop their fine motor skills, literacy and math skills through conversation, making comparisons, measuring, counting, sorting, and cutting. Check out page 13 for more ways to include your kid in the kitchen! Make mealtime fun! Sometimes it is all in the way food is presented to a child that determines if he/she is going to try it. Use food that is colourful, and arrange it in a way that is appealing to your child. For example, if your child has an interest in bugs, make fruit kabobs that look like caterpillars using grapes and strawberries. Everyone likes to dip! There are a variety of dip recipes available for both fruit and vegetables. Try hummus for a boost of protein! Sneak in those veggies. Next time you make spaghetti, blend mixed vegetables in the blender and mix it into the sauce. They will never know! There are a variety of ways to cook and present vegetables so that they don’t look like vegetables. For example; blended cauliflower with a little milk and/or sour cream looks just like mashed potatoes. Read. Children’s literature is full of characters and stories that promote healthy eating and can create the love for a character that may actually be a vegetable. Little Pea written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal is one of our favourite books. Grow a garden. You may not have the space to create a full vegetable garden, but there are other options. Many fruit and vegetables can be grown in containers, such as tomatoes, strawberries, beans, and peas. Have your child help pick out the seeds, plant them, and care for them. Once the plants begin to produce, your child will be excited to finally get to harvest and taste what they have grown. Adding fruit and vegetables to your daily meals does not need to be time consuming. These foods taste amazing in their raw state and will retain their vitamins and nutrients which often get reduced when cooked in boiling water. If you can prepare cut vegetables and store them in the fridge, they will be available and ready to eat for days. Sweet Corn and Zucchini Fritters from The School Year Survival Cookbook by Laura Keogh and Ceri Marsh Makes 14 fritters. 30 minutes. INGREDIENTS • 2 cups (500 ml) frozen corn • 2 eggs • 1 carrot, grated • 1 zucchini, grated • 1/4 cup (60 ml) thinly sliced green onion, plus more for garnish • 1/2 cup (125 ml) all-purpose or spelt flour • 1/4 tsp (1 ml) salt • 2 tbsp (30 ml) grapeseed oil PREPARATION 1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs and corn. Stir in the carrot, zucchini and green onions. Add the flour and salt and mix well. 2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Drop heaping tablespoons of batter into the skillet. Press down on the batter to form a pancake. Cook until the bottom is golden and crisp, 3 to 5 minutes. Flip and cook on the other side. 3. Drain the fritters on paper towels. Serve with sour cream and a sprinkle of green onions. Fritters will keep for 3 or 4 days in the fridge and up to 3 months in the freezer. Excerpted from The School Year Survival Cookbook: Healthy Recipes and Sanity-Saving Strategies for Every Family and Every Meal (Even Snacks) by Laura Keogh and Ceri Marsh. Copyright © 2017 Sweet Potato Chronicles. Photography copyright © 2017 Maya Visnyei Photography. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

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    4 I Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 Let’s Start Talking… in Grocery Stores! Did you know that the number of positive, quality words that children hear can really increase their future success? Talking is a form of teaching. When asked, most people will tell you that literacy is something that is learned at school or is the ability to read and write, when in fact it goes far beyond that. You are actually your child’s first teacher, and there are great learning opportunities in the world around you. Instead of adding more to your already busy to-do list, we want to help you add literacystrengthening conversations to the tasks that you are already doing. These conversation cards are a great way to get your family talking. Launching this summer all across the city, are grocery shopping conversation cards - a project from the Child & Youth Network’s Literacy Partners. With funding from the Healthy Kids Community Challenge, the cards were developed based on the recent success of a model run in laundromats. The idea is to promote meaningful and thought-provoking conversations while boosting the consumption of veggies and fruit. Each card has been loaded with questions to get you started; for example, “Lemons are yellow, but how many ways can you describe a lemon without using the word yellow?” There are three versions available in different shades of green so that families can pick up a new card each time they visit the store. Once home, each card has lunch box tips to help parents with ideas for back-to-school shopping. The cards can also be found at the London Public Library, Ontario Early Years Centres, and Family Centres. Store launches for this project are well underway, and we invite you to pick up a card while shopping at one of the following participating stores: Fruits Vegetables LET’S START TALKING Grocery shopping conversations with your family Did you know... The number of positive, quality words that children hear can really increase their future success? Grocery shopping can provide great chances for families to talk together. Here are some ideas to get you started on the back of this sheet. While you are shopping today, see how easy fun and learning together can be! Happy shopping! Fruits • What do you get when you combine an apple and a banana? An apple-ana or a ban-apple? How many crazy words can you create? • Choose 2 different berries. How are they similar and how are they different? Think weight, shape, size, colour, taste. Fun & Games • Have early readers look for a particular word or letter: “Can you find the word ‘SALE’?” “Carrot?” “How many times?” • Did you know that carrots were originally purple in colour, changing in the 17th century to orange with newer varieties? • Apples are made of 25% air. That is why they float! How much water? Hungry for more? Vegetables • Vegetables can grow up, down underground or on vines. Look at different vegetables and guess how each one grows. • I spy with my little eye 3 vegetables used in soup. Ask your child to think of 3 and guess which ones they chose. • What is your favourite colour to eat? Lunch Box Tips • If it looks fun, they’re more likely to eat it. Use mini cookie cutters to cut fruit and vegetables into fun shapes. • Pre-packaged foods are often high in fat, salt and sugar and cost more. Try to use more fruit and veggies that you prep and pack yourself. cucumber 96% Visit us online or like us on Facebook for more literacy tips and free resources: orange 87% Adrian’s No Frills 1925 Dundas Street Darryll and Tracey’s No Frills 1275 Highbury Avenue Mark and Sarah’s No Frills 960 Hamilton Road Food Basics 509 Commissioners Road West Food Basics 1401 Ernest Avenue Food Basics 1299 Oxford Street East Food Basics 1200 Commissioners Road East Sobey’s 661 Wonderland Road North FreshCo 981 Wonderland Road South Old East Village Grocer 630 Dundas Street FreshCo 645 Commissioners Rd E Hungry for more? Visit us online (thisisliteracy.ca) or like us on Facebook for more literacy tips and free resources. Rundle’s No Frills 635 Southdale Road Food Basics 1225 Wonderland Road North FreshCo 1298 Trafalgar Street

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    Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 I 5 comments from program participants: “I have learned so many new healthy recipes to make at home with my family.” “I know how to cook and be safe in the kitchen.” “I never knew I liked fruits and vegetables until trying these recipes.” Let’s Get Cookin’ Program at LUSO Community Services 96% of participants surveyed stated they know how to make healthy food choices after participating in this program 100% of participants surveyed stated they know how to make healthy meals after participating in this program This cooking program is designed to teach children age 10-12 basic cooking skills, while learning more about the benefit of eating fruit and vegetables. The Let’s Get Cookin’ program was designed by the Middlesex London Health Unit, and is being facilitated by LUSO Community Services youth program staff in Northeast London. Children participating in this 8 week cooking program are learning basic life skills in order to prepare meals, all while enhancing their knowledge of nutrition and recipes that emphasize the importance of including vegetables and fruit in their everyday meals. Each recipe that is being taught is designed to be easily understood by participants, and does not require the use of a stove top or oven. Most recipes do not require heat to be made, but some utilize an electric griddle. The purpose of this is to allow children and youth to use minimal supplies and encouraging safety in preparing these healthy meals independently. In the process of learning more about creating meals with fruit and vegetables, the participants are also taught essentials about kitchen safety and safe food handling; all important factors when beginners are learning to create their own meals. Once the students have completed the 8 weeks of training, they are given a recipe booklet full of all the recipes that they prepared within the program and a start-up cooking kit full of equipment (griddle, spatula, cutting board, etc.) and resources used within the program. The participants are also invited to be a part of a group field trip to a local fresh food market where they can purchase their own fresh fruit and vegetables for home. We feel that providing ongoing role modelling, skill building, and materials will encourage long term lifestyle changes in the lives of participating children. Some of the recipes Include: Veggie Chili, Cheddar Apple Wraps, Tortilla Wedges, Cucumber Dip and much more! ourRoots areinfresh It’s where our passion for good food began and we strongly believe it’s one of the most important parts of ahealthy diet. An easy way to sneak more fruits and veggies into your kids diet is with smoothies and popsicles! This recipe can be used to make either, and can be adjusted to suit any specific tastes. When making asmoothie, freeze your fruit first to give your drink athicker texture. For popsicles, you can use fresh or frozen fruit, whichever is more convenient; and the riper the fruit, the better, since as fruit ripens it becomes sweeter, resulting in asweeter treat! THREE LONDON LOCATIONS RECIPE orSmoothies! CREAMY TROPICAL POPSICLES 1 cup pineapple ½ cup mango ½ banana DIRECTIONS: farmboy.ca 1415 BEAVERBROOK AVENUE 109 FANSHAWE PARK ROAD EAST 1045 WELLINGTON ROAD 1 cup spinach Zest and juiceof 1 lime ¾cup milk of your choice (canbereplacedwithGreekyogurt) Puree all ingredients until smooth and enjoyas a smoothie or pour intoapopsicle mold and freezefor 3-4 hours, until completely solid.

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    6 I Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 Boosting Veggies and fruit Neighbourhood by Neighbourhood At Westmount Family Centre, we “Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit” everyday as we offer a veggie and/or fruit for snack at our playgroups. We also know that “Water Does Wonders”, so water is available at all times instead of juice! LaRibambelle and London Children’s Connection are Have you seen Family Centre Argyle’s new gardens? The Family Centre is showcasing easy ways to grow your own food - they even hosted a workshop where families could learn all about container gardening, and take home their very own garden. Container gardening is a simple, fun way to bring a vegetable garden to your home, no matter if you live in an apartment, townhouse, or condo. Look at how much fun the families had learning about container gardening! The vegetables in this salsa recipe can all be grown easily in small space or container gardens. working together to plan a bilingual “Celebrate Veggies and Fruit” cooking program for children 3-6 years of age along with their parent/caregiver. The program will feature books in English and French, fun props, hands-on activities and taste tests. Look for the program to be offered in the Fall! Fresh Tomato Salsa or Pico de Gallo Salsa By: Patricia Mazariegos This fresh made salsa is served in Central America – delicious full flavor of cilantro & lime. Ingredients: 3 tomatoes, chopped ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro ½ cup finely diced onion 1 teaspoon salt 5 Serrano chilies; 2 teaspoons lime juice finely chopped (Optional) Directions: • In a medium bowl, stir together tomatoes, onion, Serrano chilies, cilantro, salt, and lime juice. • Chill for one hour in the refrigerator before serving or tested without waiting for the flavors to meld. • For additional taste you can add 1 avocado, pitted, peeled and diced. Prep Time: 10 minutes Ready In: 1 hour 10 minutes Yield 4 servings Plant, Grow, Harvest, Share! Fresh, healthy food is much easier to find these days for residents of the Hamilton Road community. At Crouch Neighbourhood Resource Centre, located at 550 Hamilton Road, we are thrilled to have the ability to operate 5 community gardens this summer with support from the Healthy Kids Community Challenge. Children and youth in the community have helped to plant, maintain and have helped to plant and maintain the gardens, and will soon help to harvest the multitude of veggies. In addition to enjoying the veggies with their breakfast and lunches during the “Summer Splash” program, children and youth can also take some of the produce home to share with their families. Community members can also share in the bounty, as signs encourage people to help themselves. Also, salad greens, tomatoes, zucchinis, and other fresh veggies are offered at the emergency food cupboard at Crouch, where people can access a small amount of food to “tide them over.” Margaret Wills, Executive Director at Crouch shares “It’s so exciting to be able to step outside and cut off some salad greens, a few beans, and some tomatoes to offer someone who is struggling to make ends meet”. The gardens also support the “Soul Food Collective” cooking program and the weekly men’s lunch. Crouch has recently partnered with Beautiful Edibles and offered workshops on soil quality, planting, staking, and water management, helping children and youth to learn to grow their own food; skills which will last them a lifetime. When the decision was first made to partner with the library and plant right outside the library doors on Sackville St, there were concerns that perhaps the raised garden beds would be vandalized or that all of the food grown would be stolen. “The community loves and respects this garden.” Margaret Wills commented. “Not only is vandalism not an issue, community members help to care for the garden, picking weeds and cutting back leaves. One neighbour brought over cages for our tomato plants and another neighbour makes sure that the gardens are watered every Saturday. We are located in what’s considered to be a “Food Desert”, where fresh, healthy food is not easily accessible and a “food swamp” with a multitude of fast food and unhealthy options available. Crouch Neighbourhood Resource Centre, in partnership with Glen Cairn Community Resource Centre have launched the food box program. For $10, a box of fruit and vegetables may be ordered each month. Up to 70 families in the community take advantage of this opportunity to get fresh food, for an affordable price and close to home.

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    Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 I 7 Glen Cairn Community Resource Centre has gone green...and yellow, and red, and orange, and every colour of the rainbow! Vegetables and fruits are on the rise in all of our programs and wow- do they all look appealing. We now offer many programs based purely around learning about, preparing, and consuming more vegetables and fruit, and how they fit into a healthy active lifestyle. Earlier this summer, Glen Cairn partnered with the Neighbourhood Resource Association of Westminster Park (NRAWP) to launch “Veggin’ Out,” a 6 week program designed to teach 20 local neighbourhood children about fruits and vegetables from farm to table. The program included trips, from farms to farmer’s markets to restaurants and everywhere in-between. Participants learned how to pick, prepare, and consume a variety of fruits and vegetables, and ended with a community dinner where they got to show off their new skills by preparing and serving a meal to their families. Starting this fall, Glen Cairn Community Resource Centre will offer “Healthy Bodies, Healthy Minds,” a program designed to increase the overall healthy physical activity and healthy eating habits among families, and provide homework support to children. The program will allow parents to learn and practice healthy physical activity, while their children will learn how to create and prepare new healthy snacks and the importance of a fruit and vegetable-filled diet. Children will also learn how to stay active with no equipment, in any space, at any time, and staff will provide any homework support they may need during the program time. One of Glen Cairn’s longest running programs is the “iCook” program. Children learn the basics of cooking healthy and nutritious foods in this fun, interactive program. Come have fun, try new foods, and eat your own cooking creations! In partnership with Crouch neighbourhood resource centre, Glen Cairn Community Resource Centre is also proud of their “Good Food Box,” a program designed to provide community residents with local produce for a low cost once a month. Each box includes a variety of fruit and vegetables as well as healthy tips for preserving and preparing your produce - all for the low cost of $10. For more information, please visit www.gccrc.ca EAT THE RAINBOW! SuperFoods for SuperKids is a free and fun hands-on healthy cooking, art, and sensory program for 3-6 year olds and their parents/ caregivers. A different color and health “superpower” is explored weekly! Take a look at the colour recipes for Green, Yellow, Red, and Orange Super Foods! Orange Superfood Recipes Superpower: Vitamin C for Super-Vision! Sunny Orange Mango Smoothie Blend 2 peeled oranges, 2 cups of frozen mango, 2 bananas, 1 cup of ice, and 1 tsp vanilla with 4 cups soy or coconut milk. Add a squeeze of honey to sweeten if you want. Sprinkle with chia seeds (optional), serve and enjoy! Orange Stuffed Peppers stuffed with Orange Stuff! Cut the top off an orange pepper and scoop out the seeds. Stuff with rice or quinoa seasoned with butter, salt, and pepper and add shredded carrots, golden raisins, cheese (optional hemp seeds). Oven bake at 350 o for 10 minutes then switch to a low broil for 3 minutes. Green Superfood Recipes Superpower: Calcium for Unbreakable Bones! Mint Chocolate Chip “Ice Cream” Blend (in a blender or food processor) 2 chopped frozen bananas with 1 tablespoon coconut milk, vanilla, 2 tsp honey and ½ tsp mint extract and 1/2 cup fresh spinach. Once blended add chocolate chips and serve. Top with coconut whip cream and/or sprinkles! Greenie Pasta with fresh herbs & butter Add fresh chopped herbs (parsley and basil) to spinach pasta and combine with butter. Top with parmesan. Crunchy Kale Chips Tear the leaves from a fresh kale bunch, leaving the hard stem and veins. Coat with olive oil and sea salt and bake at 300 o for 20 minutes (flip once). YELLOW Superfood Recipes Superpower: Vitamin C Magical Healing! Banana Flax Chocolate Chips Muffins Combine wet (2 old bananas, 3/4 cup coconut milk, 1 tsp lemon juice, ¼ cup pure maple syrup and 1 tsp vanilla) and dry (A pinch of sea salt, 1.2 tsp baking soda, 1 tsp baking powder, 1.5 cups of flour and 3 tbsp flaxseed) ingredients in a bowl. Bake in mini-muffin or muffin pans at 375 o for 18 minutes. Serve with fresh sliced bananas and chocolate dipped pineapples! Yellow Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Yellow Sauce Slice a spaghetti squash lengthways. Bake at 350 o for 30 minutes until fork tender. Separate the “spaghetti” strands with a fork and add butter, salt and pepper, and cheese if desired. Top with sauce made from yellow cherry tomatoes slowly sautéed in olive oil. Red Superfood Recipes Superpower: Antioxidant Shields! Fancy and Sweet Red Rice Cook brown rice (or quinoa). Add a small amount of butter. Add cranberries, pomegranate seeds and chopped red pepper as well as salt, pepper, and garlic powder to taste. If You Love Working With Children, We Would Love You ToWork With Us! You Can Stay at HOME And Earn an Income! Be a Child Care Provider With Wee Watch. Stay at home to be with your own children. Guaranteed bi-weekly pay & stat holiday pay. s of being self-employed. Run your own business with RECE &Agency support. Alicensed agency with over 30 years or child care experience. Now available - Wage Enhancement Funding = more pay for YOU - up to $20/day Recieve start-up assistance, training, program materials, back-up support and so much more. Call us, let’s talk: 519-850-7019 Or visit: weewatch.com Quality Licensed Home Child Care

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    8 I Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 Harvest Bucks Harvest Bucks are vouchers that can be used to purchase ‘free’ fruit and vegetables from local farmers’ markets. This year the participating markets and vendors include: Covent Garden Market, Farmers’ & Artisans’ Market at the Western Fair, Masonville Farmers’ & Artisans’ Market, On the Move Organics Delivery, and Old East Village Grocer. The program helps to increase local access to and consumption of vegetables and fruit while promoting community connectedness through the farmers’ market experience. This collaborative program involves many community partners including the Middlesex-London Health Unit, London’s Child and Youth Network, local farmers’ markets, and community service organizations. The vouchers are distributed at food-based learning workshops that promote food literacy and consumption of fruit and vegetables, as well as at emergency food cupboards to supplement other basic needs. Funded programs offer various food literacy learning opportunities such as farmers’ market tours, hands- on food preparation, and education about fruit and vegetable storage, healthy eating, budgeting, and more. Local organizations can apply during the application period to receive sponsored Harvest Bucks to distribute to their clients and/ or participants to supplement their teachings around food skills and promotion of healthy eating. Harvest Bucks can also be purchased directly from the Middlesex- London Health Unit for distribution. In 2016, over $56,000 Harvest Bucks were distributed and 83% were redeemed to buy vegetables and fruits from local farmers’ markets. That’s over $46,000 worth of fruits and vegetables in the hands of Londoners. Interested in donating to Harvest Bucks? 100% of financial donations are used to purchase Harvest Bucks for sponsored organizations. In 2016, over $56,000 Harvest Bucks were distributed and 83% were redeemed to buy vegetables and fruits from local farmers’ markets. n More information including a list of some of the funded organizations can be found at www.healthunit.com/harvest-bucks Healthy Kids Community Challenge: Children’s Menu Assessment What was the project: London-area restaurants children’s menus were assessed to explore our children’s exposure to healthy and unhealthy food and beverages What tool was used: The Children’s Menu Assessment tool, an expansion of a validated restaurant audit tool (NEMS-R) was used.

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    Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 I 9 what’s in a fruit? Fruit come in all shapes and sizes. What differences come to mind? Can you name all of the parts of fruit? Botanists (plant scientists) have come up with different ways to group fruits together based on how their seeds develop when fertilized (or are triggered to develop, even without fertilization). Plants usually develop soft, fleshy, sweet-tasting fruit around their seeds so that animals are more like to eat them and drop them off elsewhere to grow new plants. There are so many different ways that fruits grow, that it’s hard to come up with distinct rules about how to classify them. These classifications are generally accepted in botany, but as always in the science community, things change and not everyone agrees all the time. Most fruit have the same layers around their seeds but the layers are different thicknesses, textures and colours. The four main parts are: • the seed – when planted in the right conditions, seeds are able to regrow a whole new plant • the endocarp – this layer wraps around the seed • the mesocarp – this layer wraps around the endocarp • the exocarp – this layer wraps around the mesocarp Here are some of the most common groups of fruit and vegetables, and some of the most common ones we eat of each kind. Do any surprise you? Are there any fruits that we usually call vegetables? Berry Berries have soft and fleshy endocarps and mesocarps, with a thin soft exocarp. Berries usually contain multiple seeds. Examples: kiwi, tomato, banana, coffee, currant, passionfruit, pepper, grapes Pepo Pepos are large fruits with a hard outer exocarp shell, and contain multiple seeds. They are considered a type of berry. Examples: gourds (squash, pumpkin), melon (cantaloupe, watermelon), cucumber; papaya, Drupe Drupes are soft, fleshy fruit that contain a hard pit or ‘stone’ with one seed inside. The stone is the endocarp, with a thick, juicy mesocarp. Examples: cherry, plum, nectarine, olive, coconut Aggregate Fruits Aggregate fruit refers to those where many fruits are clustered together. Examples: aggregate drupes (raspberry, loganberry); each of the little drupe in an aggregate drupe is called a ‘drupelet’ Hesperidium Hesperidium fruit have waxy, leathery exocarps, spongy mesocarps and an endocarp made of many juice sacs in several partitioned segments. Examples: All citrus fruit (lemon, lime, orange, kumquat) Accessory fruits Accessory fruits are not traditional fruits in that other parts of the flower are also part of the ‘fruit’ we eat. Strawberries are a good example: it has all of its ‘true fruits’ as small on the outside of a swollen ‘fleshy receptacle’. Pome Pomes are also accessory fruits that have a papery complete fruit in the middle, surrounded by a fleshy protective layer. These internal complete fruits contain multiple seeds inside the papery inner chambers. All pomes are produced by plants in the Rose family. Examples: apples, pears, quince Multiple Fruits Multiple fruits are another type of accessory fruit, as they have many complete fruits and other parts of the flower and stem fused together around their seeds. Examples: pineapple, figs, mulberry Vegetable Varieties Vegetables come in even more shapes and sizes than fruits – imagine that! Vegetables include edible leaves, stems, tubers, bulbs and roots. Do you know the differences between them all? Let’s explore a bit more... Leaves: Just what you’d think – the leaves of a plant. Some grow separately, and some grow as a cluster. Examples: romaine lettuce, iceberg lettuce, kale, cabbage, bok choy, arugula, herbs, brussel sprouts Unfertilized flowers: Some flowers have clusters of ‘florets’ (small flowers). We often eat these flowers if they do not develop into fruit. Examples: broccoli, cauliflower, broccoflower, artichokes Stems: Stems are the upright parts of the plants from which leaves and flowers grow. Examples: asparagus, rhubarb, kohlrabi Seeds: All plants naturally produce seeds. Some plants grow wet juicy protective layers around their seeds which are considered to be ‘fruit’. Other plants grow drier layers around their seeds, which include nuts and legumes. Examples: peas, corn, peanuts, walnuts, beans, lentil, chickpeas, Bulbs: Part of some plants that grows just below ground. Bulbs made up of many clustered segments or layers of specialized leaves that produce an upright leafy shoot. Examples: onion, garlic, fennel, shallot, leek Roots: Part of some plants that grows underground; usually long or roundshaped with a narrow point at one end Examples: carrots, parsnips, beet, turnip Tubers: Tubers grow underground as part of a plant’s root. These bulbous tubers are used by the plant to store energy to use Examples: yam, potato, Jerusalem artichoke, cassava Learn some Ancient Greek! carp- • comes from ‘karpos’ which means ‘fruit’ endo- • Refers to the inner part of something • comes from ‘éndon’ which means ‘within’ • “endocarp” means “inside of fruit” meso- • Refers to the middle part of something • comes from ‘misos’ which means ‘middle’ • “mesocarp” means “middle of fruit” exo- • Refers to the outer part of something • comes from ‘éxo’ which means ‘outside’ • “exocarp” means “outside of fruit” Test Yourself! Which type of fruit or vegetable are each of the following? 1) Pears: ________________ 2) Honeydew Melon: _______________ 3) Spinach:______________ 4) Peach:________________ 5) Sweet Potato:_______________ 6) Blackberry:___________ 7) Celery: _______________ 8) Radish: ______________ 9) Mint:_________________ 10) Zucchini:_____________ 11) Eggplant:_____________ 12) Grapefruit:____________ Answers: (1) Pome; (2) Pepo; (3) Leaf; (4) Drupe; (5) Tuber; (6) Aggregate Drupe; (7) Stalk; (8) Root; (9) Leaf; (10) Pepo; (11) Berry; (12) Hesperidium

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    10 I Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit • Thursday, August 24, 2017 Veggies and Fruit I Spy Paint Stick Garden Markers WHAT YOU’LL NEED: • Paint Stir Sticks (available in packages at hardware or paint stores) • Acrylic Paint & Paintbrushes • Alphabet Rubber Stamps • Stamp Pad with waterproof permanent ink Or Letter stickers Or Markers • Clear Coat Sealer WHAT TO DO: • Paint and decorate the paint sticks with acrylic paint, and allow to dry completely. (Make sure children are wearing old clothing or a paint shirt as the acrylic paint doesn't wash out of clothing once dry) • Use Alphabet Stamps & permanent ink, letter stickers or a permanent marker to add veggie names to the sticks. • Thoroughly cover the front and back of your new veggie markers with a clear coat sealer so that the weather doesn't ruin your work. Let dry completely before add them to your garden. Can you name all the different vegetables and fruit too? Craft activity provided by Family Centre Argyle Find these words! fruit and Veggies word search A X Y P Q L E F A B T N Z N P K P L U M A S P A R A G U S A G W D E R H A M N N R G H L P A R I T G A O F K G F D C O O P P B A N K E J M P E G G P L A N T A R R T I P I O G H T H T C R L W E E P O H K A R E B A N A N A J R W T F V Y M I E B R O C C O L I O P O O R K S D F M G G S T R A W B E R R Y Q U Y K A L M U J O Garden Tomato Broccoli A ______________________ B _______________________ C_______________________ D ______________________ E _______________________ F _______________________ G_______________________ H ______________________ I _______________________ J _______________________ K _______________________ L _______________________ Asparagus Strawberry Plum Mango Carrot Apple Eggplant Banana Grape test your knowledge Can you name a vegetable or fruit for every letter of the Alphabet? Which letter has more than 2? Or more than 5? Some can be tricky but try your best!! N ______________________ O ______________________ P _______________________ Q ______________________ R _______________________ S _______________________ T _______________________ U ______________________ V _______________________ W ______________________ X ______________________ Y _______________________ M ______________________ Z _______________________ If you need a little extra help, you can find hints throughout this paper!

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