Topics
Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
Sudbury Progress 2016
Magazines / Newspapers | Agriculture / Business Products & Services / Business / Chemicals / Construction / Energy production / Telecommunications / Arts / College / Education / Arts / Festivals & Events / Community / Advertisement 2016-04-22 09:29:43
Page 1 of 3
  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 1

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 2

    ÉTUDESJOURNALISTIQUES FOLKLORE ET ETHNOLOGIE INDIGENOUS STUDIES PHILOSOPHY RELIGIOUS STUDIES The University of Sudbury has offered me an incredible environment in which I have grown both as an academic and as an individual. In my opinion, the small class sizes allow for unparalleled one-on-one interaction with professors and allow for students to share ideas and learn from each other’s perspectives. I would strongly encourage students to take a program or courses at the University of Sudbury. I did, and it changed my life for the better in so many ways. Kian Madgedi, graduate Shaping your future Viens créer ton avenir Naaknigeng Niigaan ge mno-aabjitooyin 705-673-5661 www.usudbury.ca Member of the Laurentian Federation

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 3

    greaT er S udbury Making The Sudbury Star | 3 progress JeNN LAmOthe For The Sudbury Star It used to be that the fate of Greater Sudbury would rise and fall with the mining industry. Now, with many other economic drivers, the City of Greater Sudbury is making progress. And so, The Sudbury Star presents Progress 2016. The education capital of the north continues to perform extremely well, with students at post-secondary institutions reporting extremely high satisfaction rates, like Collège Boréal’s graduates, and others looking to lead applied research projects, like Cambrian College. Laurentian University is currently pursuing their new Mining Innovation and Technology Research initiative (LMIT), The Laurentian School of Architecture is continuing its mission by staying true to its northern ideals, and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine is providing desperately needed physicians to remote and rural areas. NORCAT is also bolstering the teaching and training needs of Greater Sudbury, with its most recent initiative to promote health and safety in the mines comes via a virtual reality game, debuting this June at Dynamic Earth. SNOLAB is also continuing its important research with dark matter and neutrinos, on the heels of some amazing awards — like the Nobel Prize. The health-care industry in Greater Sudbury will hopefully be getting a boost from the purchase of a PET scanner, the fruit of a long campaign to offer the piece of equipment to northern patients. Health Sciences North is also endeavouring to change the way patients are treated, using new technology to better serve those in need. The City of Lakes Family Health team is opening a new clinic in Chelmsford, offering a team of health-care providers, and there are new walk-in-clinics in town, all hoping to reduce the number of emergency room visits and inconveniences faced by patients without a family doctor. Though 2015 was tough year for the mining industry, and the communities that support it, Vale is continuing work on their Clean AER project, with a target finish of 2018. As well, Dick DeStefano, executive director of the Sudbury Area Mining Supply and Service Association, offers his insight into the Greater Sudbury Development Corporation’s strategic plan (From the Ground Up 2015-2025). There is no shortage of things to do and see in Greater Sudbury, and The Sudbury Star’s Progress 2016 will offer a chance to hear more about the wonderful festivals, like Up Here and Northern Lights Festival Boreal. If you are looking to learn, or for a great family outing, be sure to check out what is upcoming for Science North and Dynamic Earth. You can also get an update on the new retail stores and their great offerings, as well as an insight into the proposals for events centres. Karsten Johansen Group Director, Media Sales Melanie Junge Group Manager, Media Sales Don MacDonald Managing Editor kjohansen@postmedia.com mjunge@postmedia.com DMacDonald@postmedia.com 128 Pine Street, Unit 201, Sudbury, ON., P3C 1X3 • April 2016

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 4

    AD{TS4563887} 4 | The Sudbury Star G reaT er S udbury Strategic plan will guide the city and council through important decisions Building a stronger city Brian Bigger Mayor, City of Greater Sudbury As I look forward to the warmer weather and an exciting year ahead of us, it is important that we reflect on the City of Greater Sudbury council’s progress to date. It is also important that I share my thoughts with you on the future of our great city. In 2015, council and I worked together and charted a course for our term in council. Our strategic plan, called Greater Together, will guide the city and council through many important decisions and will help us continue to act in the best interest of the citizens and in conjunction with our city’s official plan. We have defined a bold and ambitious vision for the community and believe that together, we can build a stronger and more diversified city. We will provide responsive, fiscally prudent and open governance and in doing so; achieve prosperous economic growth and development, an improved quality of life for all and sustainable infrastructure. I look forward to working with staff on the implementation. Our new CAO of the City of Greater Sudbury, Ed Archer, will play a vital role in implementing the plan and ensuring that targets are met, as well as to lead the organization forward. I look forward to working with Ed and continuing to work with our senior management team on a number of key initiatives. We have made significant investments in our growing arts and culture sector, active transportation, road safety and health care. Council also made an important choice to hand the Healthy Community Initiative (HCI) funds over to the leisure services department to be administered moving forward. We will also continue to work with partners of the provincial and federal government to secure crucial funding on a number of infrastructure and communitybuilding projects. Looking ahead, we will continue to advance the water and sub-watershed studies to protect our fresh-water systems across our city. In fact, we have received a $2.3-million investment from the province of Ontario to do so. Recently, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visited our community to officially announce the federal government contribution of $26.7 million, along with the investment from the government of Ontario, for the Maley Drive extension. I am thrilled that this project is moving ahead after many years. It highlights the confidence that the provincial and federal governments have in our community, and will position us for growth in the future. In addition to Maley Drive, work is expected to begin on a number of key infrastructure projects across our community, such as MR35 and Lorne Street. In April, council and I will work with staff to prioritize a number of large projects that were presented back in November. I am optimistic about the future of our community and encourage citizens to continue to engage in our community, as well. I look forward to the coming year and remain committed to working for you. Together, let’s make Sudbury greater. Worth Switching Supermarkets… New PC Plus TM Points It’s quick, easy and free You can earn even more PC ® points with exclusive PC Plus TM offers* The points you earn are added to your existing PC ® points balance Get personalized online offers based on what you buy most S ponS ored C onT enT Collège Boréal meeting the needs of students Collège Boréal, the heart of bilingual education in the north, is a school that not only has the highest satisfaction rate in the province from its graduating students, but also their future employers. If you glance at their Strategic Plan, launched in 2015, it’s easy to see why. When designing or adding programs to its offerings, the staff at Collège Boréal examine job markets across Ontario, seeking new opportunities and ideas. Every program at the school has an advisory committee; a group of employers and experts that examine each program, on a regular basis, to ensure it is meeting the needs of the students and the industry. Collège Boréal ensures its programs are pertinent, relevant and prepare their students for the post-secondary careers they’ve worked so hard to achieve. It also offers their students flexibility in their education. Whether they access Collège Boréal from one of its seven campuses, or one of 18 access centres, and industry each student gets a personalized experience meant to support them through their studies. Students at the college now have the option to gain a degree on top of their diploma, without having to restart their education. Collège Boréal has agreements with several universities across the province ready to help students transfer their already-earned college credits into the beginnings of a degree; with this combination of theoretical knowledge — and practical skills gained at Collège Boréal — employers know that choosing a Collège Boréal graduate will result in success for all. Collège Boréal will continue to meet the needs of employers, as well as its students, for a long time to come. An education from Collège Boréal could be the first step to a new career, even a new life, and students can rest assured they will get the education they need for today’s, and tomorrow’s, job market.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 5

    AD{TS4532375} I was born and raised in Northern Ontario. For many years, I’ve been a business owner and an active participant in our community. I’m proud to see that our government’s first budget fulfills our promises and confirms substantial new investments throughout our region. Simply put, budget 2016 is good for the north and good for Greater Sudbury. Now in Ottawa, I take pride in telling my colleagues that from my business office in the centre of the city, I see three headframes, a smelter and the secondlargest smokestack in the world. Nowhere else in the world is the mining industry so pervasive. Most know that Greater Sudbury is home to one of the largest integrated mining complexes in the world. Without a doubt, it is the richest mining district in North America and is one of the leading hardrock mining regions in the world. It was a sector largely ignored by the past government and I have committed to raising it in Ottawa at every opportunity. But not many know that Greater Sudbury is in the midst of an innovation boom, and local mining research and development has evolved into a world-class industry all its own. Many of the brightest minds and mining-related sciences are being drawn to Greater Sudbury to be part of one of the world’s most advanced clusters of international mining research and partnerships involving post-secondary institutions, all levels of government, and some of the world’s largest mining corporations. The long-term sustainability of our industry is dependent on the innovative research coming out of our post-secondary institutions. That’s why our government is investing $2 billion in labs and buildings on college and university campuses, a further $184 million this year in training to help Canadians transition and update their skills and another investing $95 million a year more in science. I’m also proud to say we are investing heavily in infrastructure. In fact, our commitment to helping cities rebuild Investing in greater S udbury the Sudbury Star | 5 Government’s innovation first budget good for Greater Sudbury’s future infrastructure Paul lefebvre Member of Parliament for Sudbury and “This funding will help to create good jobs, better our communities and grow the roads and bridges is strong enough that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came to Greater Sudbury specifically to announce the long-awaited $82-million Maley Drive reconstruction and expansion project. We are investing $11.9 billion starting right away to build roads, bridges, improve public transit, improve water and wastewater facilities and refurbish affordable housing. This will create tens of thousands of jobs in cities, such as Greater Sudbury. Locally, FedNor will share in $150 million in new funding to support projects to renovate, expand and improve existing community and cultural infrastructure in all regions of the country to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017. I’m also proud to report our government is making the first of many crucial investments in Northern Ontario First Nations communities that will be key to unlocking the promise of Ring of Fire. Our plan is to address the underlying problems of infrastructure, nutrition and education in First Nations communities, so the residents of the area are ready for the developments to come. I know that, along with my Northern Ontario caucus colleagues, we will champion these opportunities by standing up for the leaders who are prospecting and investing in Northern Ontario; the researchers and innovators whose work allows us to mine, process and transfer ore sustainably; and importantly, the indigenous peoples of that area who have called these lands home for generations. We are investing in Canada, and in Canadians. We are investing in industries, in students, in our cities and in arts and culture. We are investing in Greater Sudbury, and in the resourcefulness of Sudburians. This will be our government’s legacy. I’m looking forward to working with all of you — to build this beautiful, smart, resourceful and always exciting City of Greater Sudbury. This $26.7 million investment will fund the creation of a new, much needed middle class. east-west arterial link through the city.” — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Add a touch of elegance to your garden with decorative stone. For driveways, walkways and gardens our beautiful stones create an exceptional landscape design. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, came to Greater Sudbury specifically to announce the long-awaited $82-million Maley Drive reconstruction and expansion project. Trudeau is pictured with Greater Sudbury liberal MP Paul lefebvre. Pink Quartz, White Stone, Terracotta Stone, Granular ‘A’ for Driveways, Gabion Stone (round field stone) 2589 Ida St., Sudbury 522-6340 www.ethiersandandgravel.ca

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 6

    6 | The Sudbury Star mining Vale committed to completing project and meeting environmental commitments Despite challenges, Sudbury Star file photo Jenn Lamothe For The Sudbury Star Last year was very challenging for mining in Canada, and the world. Low commodity prices — nickel alone lost 40% of its value — mixed with decreased global demand for the product can spell trouble for the industry, and communities that support it. Despite these challenges, Vale is committed to completing their Clean AER project. “We’ve looked at some minor adjustments to our capital investment in the next year, but we’re not changing our commitment to completing the project and meeting our environmental commitments in 2018,” says Dave Marshall, director of the project, speaking to a group at a Canadian Institute of Mining meeting in January of this year. The adjustments were made to assist the company in keeping costs down, but will have no effect on the project itself, says Angie Robson, manager of corporate and aboriginal affairs. “Given the size of the Clean AER project, we have adjusted the schedule for some spending in 2016, to smooth out our capital profile, however those changes will not impact upon the current overall timeline or our regulatory obligations. Having said this, we are making excellent progress on the project — we are more than 55% complete and significant work is still scheduled for this year,” says Robson. The Clean AER project seeks to reduce its sulphur dioxide emissions to between 20,000 and 25,000 tonnes per year, an 85% drop from the current release of Clean AER project still a go 150,000 tonnes per year. It will also reduce the particulate matter (dust and metal emissions) and greenhouse gasses by as much as 40% — meeting or exceeding current ministry standards. “At the heart of the project, gases that currently go up the Superstack from the smelter converter aisle, will be captured and sent to our acid plant, to be converted into sulphuric acid and sold,” says Robson. “Two of three new converters, which have been fabricated locally, have been delivered to the smelter to date.” Vale has already improved materials handling and containment, and left to be completed is “construction of a new secondary baghouse at the smelter, construction of a new wet gas cleaning plant and commissioning of the remaining two converters.” In difficult economic times, rumours can abound. Extended summer shutdowns have been reported, though “There is no extended shutdown, or planned maintenance period, scheduled for our surface operations this year,” says Robson, indicating the next planned maintenance is scheduled for spring 2017. Rumours of the sale of Greater Sudbury operations have floated, but no plans have been announced, and investment in Photo supplied the Clean aeR project seeks to reduce its sulphur dioxide emissions to between 20,000 and 25,000 tonnes per year, an 85% drop from current release. Greater Sudbury has continued unabated. The success of the Clean AER project leads to one other question — what is the future of the Superstack? Robson says, “Given the tremendous reduction in emissions resulting from the Clean AER project, the future of the Superstack is in question. We have received a lot of interest about this from the community and have been pleased to see residents so engaged in this discussion,” but she adds, “To date, no final decision has been made.”

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 7

    AD{TS4531422} AD{TS4531591} AD{TS4563876} healT h Sam Bruno PET Scan Committee is more than half way to its goal Laura Stradiotto For The Sudbury Star It’s full steam ahead for members of the Sam Bruno PET Scan Committee working to reach their $4.8-million campaign goal by the fall. “We’re more than half way there now,” says committee spokesperson Brenda Tessaro. “The faster we get this done, the faster we’re going to get it here.” A positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that helps reveal how tissues and organs are functioning. It’s a powerful diagnostic device in the diagnosis and staging of treatment for various cancers, heart disease, epilepsy and Parkinson and Alzheimer’s disease. There are nine permanent PET scanners in Ontario and only one in the north, located in Thunder Bay. The man behind the campaign, Sam Bruno, lost his battle to cancer in 2010, but was an outspoken advocate, lobbying the province for two years to improve access to PET scanning and have one located in the region. As each year passes his dream comes closer to reality. In December 2015, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care announced it would reserve $1.6 million in operational funding for PET scanner for the northeast region beginning April 1. The City of Greater Sudbury has allocated $100,000 a year for 10 years PET project closer to reality toward the PET project. However, the money for capital equipment purchases at Ontario hospitals must be raised in their communities. The province only provides operating costs when it comes to new equipment. Since the province announced its support late last year, it significantly helped the campaign. In late March, Tessaro was waiting to hear whether two major corporations would make financial contributions to the campaign. With an upcoming spring fundraiser and anticipated corporate and personal donations, Tessaro is optimistic the committee will raise the remaining $1.9 million required to purchase the scan and construct a room for it. Architectural plans are underway to design that room and once it’s complete, the plan will be forwarded to the Ministry of Health for approval, says Tessaro. Earlier this year, Mark Hartman, vicepresent of regional cancer services and medical imaging at HSN, told The Sudbury Star that according to a 2010 study, it will take anywhere from 18 months to two years to install a PET scanner, but HSN officials are already working with Chefurka Consulting International Inc. to ensure the space that will be built for the scanner meets current and future needs. Local firm, Yallowega Belanger Architects, is studying the information that comes out of that consultation and transform it into architectural plans. The cost of a PET scanner is estimated at $3.5 million and construction is pegged at $1.5 million. Earlier this year, the committee received a $20,000 donation from Branch 76 of the Royal Canadian Legion. The donation comes from Branch 76’s 2015 poppy campaign and brings the PET Scan campaign total to $2.1 million. Tax receipts will be issued for all donations made to the Sam Bruno PET Scan Campaign through the Northern Cancer Foundation. Members of the Sam Bruno PEt Steering Committee, Brenda tessaro, left, Cheryl Bruno, trisha Moore, Mary Hopkin and rita Beech at the cancer centre in Greater Sudbury. Missing from the photo are Jody third, Frank Bruno and Lori Bouchard. Gino donato The Sudbury Star h ONOUR ROll The Sudbury Star | 7 38 YEARS IN BUSINESS Finest Health Food Supplements & Organic Foods • Cholesterol & Heart Health • Detoxification • Pain • Weight Loss • Prostate Support • Vitamin/Mineral Supplements 37 Years • Organic Foods • Wheat/Gluten Free • Bulk Foods • Homeopathic & Herbal Remedies • Energy Support • Digestive Care 1191 Montrose Avenue 705-566-3820 www.durhamnatural.com Dependable Cleaning from the Professionals you have Trusted since 1979! (705) 673-8400 sudbury@mollymaid.ca 35 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE One of the first things you notice about someone is their smile. A Healthy Mouth Leads to a Healthy Body Good oral health helps prevent several systemic diseases. Complete oral assessments, complete periodontal assessments, oral cancer screenings with IDENTAFI light, dental cleanings, mouth guards, LED in office tooth whitening. 1313 Lorne St. Unit 1 • 705.586.8686 http://www.expressionsdh.com

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 8

    8 | The Sudbury Star F e STivalS Festivals provide essential fundraising for local charities Laura Stradiotto For The Sudbury Star Celebrating all artistic forms There’s something exciting happening around every corner during Greater Sudbury’s warmer months with festivals celebrating everything from garlic to music. Last August, the inaugural Up Here (formerly Up Fest) drew more than 6,000 people to the downtown core to listen and watch as 130 artists took to the streets, alleyways and venues in wild abandon. Up Here is part public art festival, part emerging music festival, which culminates into an all-night art crawl. Simply put, the festival is about the “new,” says co-founder Christian Pelletier. “New artists trying brand new things, new murals coming to life on old walls, new people discovering downtown Sudbury under whole a new light. I think that’s what people will come to remember about Up Here: It’s where you come to discover something new.” The creative team behind the festival is looking to build upon last year’s success when the festival returns Aug. 11 to 14. “This year, we’ll be growing on what worked so well last year by adding more late concerts in new venues, more murals on new walls, more surprise shows in back alleys, and tons more free events for families and curious music lovers,” says Pelletier. “All of We Live Up Here’s projects are about reclaiming public space and we can’t give away too many details just yet, but let’s just say that if all goes according to plan, we’ll be reclaiming public space in a really big way this year with the help of some pretty notable international muralists.” While Pelletier was tight lipped on headliners he revealed details about some smaller acts. The Visit is a voice a cello duo from Ottawa, which blends “classical chamber music with the intricacy of Middle Eastern music and the intensity of heavy metal,” he says. Pelletier described their sound as “hymns from an ancient dead religion.” Also on the lineup is U.S. Girls, the band would be making their Northern Ontario debut. Also on tap is Canadian visual artist Kirsten McCrea who, along with many other muralists, will be transforming downtown spaces into beautiful murals. Pelletier said last year’s success can also be attributed to 150 volunteers and the involvement of more than 60 businesses and organizations from mining companies to coffee shops. Volunteers really are the backbone of any festival — no matter the focus of the celebration. Brian Kolosky has volunteered with the Greater Sudbury Dragon Boat Festival for 16 years. This year, it takes place July 16 on Ramsey Lake. But after 16 years of racing, the boats were in dire need of restoration. The work is being done at Rezplast Manufacturing and includes a special gel coat and fiberglass reinforcement strip along the bottom ridges. “One of the boats actually leaks and so the idea is to fill the holes and reinforce it so it doesn’t wear through again,” says Kolosky. After the facelift the boats will be transported to the new Northern Water Sports Centre. “For me, this is an opportunity to give back to the community,” Kolosky says. “I like the fact that the festival raises money locally and it stays local.” Since its inception, the festival has raised $1.5 million for local causes. The festival commits to support one charity for a two-year term. Last year, it raised $70,000 for the Sam Bruno PET Scan Fund. “We’ll take whatever we can get,” Kolosky says about the Dragon Boat Festival goal this summer for the same charity. Festivals not only provide great entertainment, but, like the Dragon Boat Festival, provide essential fundraising for local charities. The annual Rotary Blues for Food helps restock the shelves at the Sudbury Food Bank. To get in, all you need is a nonperishable food item or cash donation for Photo supplied Melbourne Ska orchestra performed at northern Lights Festival Boreal last year. the food bank. The 26th annual festival takes place June 11 on Durham Street and the municipal parking lot on Larch Street in downtown. It’s one of the few festivals in the city that closes streets to traffic. Downtown Sudbury Ribfest, held on the Labour Day weekend, shuts down part of Elgin Street to host professional rib teams, live music, food and family entertainment. Ribfest also raises money for the Canadian Red Cross Sudbury Branch. For more food and merriment, attend a cultural festival and not only enjoy ethnic specialties, but be Greek, Italian or Ukrainian for the day. In July, there’s the Italian Festival at the Caruso Club and Greek Festival at the Hellenic Centre. In August, comes the john Lappa The Sudbury Star up here Festival team includes Miriam Cusson, left, Sophie ducharme, jen McKerral and Christian pelletier. Canadian Garlic Festival at the Ukrainian Senior’s Centre. Let’s not forget painting the town blue with the Greater Sudbury Blueberry Festival. Celebrating its 31st anniversary, this year’s festival takes place July 10 to 17. A Greater Sudbury festival itinerary wouldn’t be complete without the Northern Lights Festival Boreal, Canada’s longest continuous running music festival. The 45th edition of the festival takes place July 8 to 10 on the shores of Ramsey Lake. The festival has announced some artists, including Natalie McMaster and Donnell Leahy, Union Duke, Kate Maki and Fred Squire. The festival has grown and diversified since the inaugural Northern Lights Folks Festival was held in 1972, showcasing acclaimed artists from Serena Ryder to Stan Rogers and Buffy Ste. Marie. But the lineup of indie, roots and world music isn’t limited to the July festival — throughout the year the festival hosts concerts and a competition among northern artists to snag a spot on stage. Francophone singer/ songwriter Martine Fortin, and the band Collective Roots, won the 2016 Meltdown Competition and a chance to perform at the festival. See FEStiVaLS page 9

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 9

    AD{TS4569777} educaT ion The Sudbury Star | 9 Co-ordinating and promotingresearch Laurentian Mining Innovation and Technology will expand university’s international reach Laura Stricker For The Sudbury Star A new organization has brought together more than 200 mining researchers under the same roof. The Laurentian Mining Innovation and Technology initiative (LMIT) was established earlier this year. LMIT was created to co-ordinate and promote all the research conducted at Laurentian University’s four research centres. This includes the Mineral Exploration Research Centre (MERC), the Centre for Research in Occupational Safety and Health (CROSH), the Vale Living with Lakes Centre and the Mining Innovation ben LeSSon The Sudbury Star Vic Pakalnis, Laurentian Mining innovation and technology (LMit) associate vice-president. Rehabilitation and Applied Research Corporation (MIRARCO). “LMIT is an overarching initiative to try and provide more clarity in terms of what resources we have at Laurentian University,” says Vic Pakalnis, LMIT’s associate vice-president. “We felt that we should take a leadership role in cleaning up what we’re doing at Laurentian, and LMIT was the result.” The researchers are currently working on various projects, including a CROSH study on mental health in the mining industry. Last month, MIRARCO received $5 million over two years from the province’s Green Investment Fund. The money will be used to work with remote First Nations communities. Led by Laurentian’s Ontario Centre for Climate Impacts and Adaptation Resources (OCCIAR), the $5 million will go to developing a climate change impact study for remote First Nations in Ontario, work with the communities to get ready for climate change and help them benefit from the government’s proposed cap-and-trade program. Part of the goal in forming LMIT, Pakalnis says, was to expand the university’s international reach (for instance, they are in negotiations to work with a mining and technology university in China). “Laurentian wants to be known for a number of things … but in the mining area we have an advantage. I think LMIT will contribute to Laurentian’s reputation worldwide. People will want to work with us, find out what the latest technology, the latest knowledge is. “We have a great advantage in Greater Sudbury because we have 14 mines that are right within our city limits. I think that’s unique of any mining school. There is no mining school like it in Canada.” According to Pakalnis, the blossoming mining supply sector also stands to benefit from LMIT. “The fact that we also have a very large mining supply and equipment, technical services sector — at least 300 firms in this area that can take advantage of LMIT — can work with us bringing in clients from other countries. Also, we can work on problems they might be having, or explore opportunities for additional growth. That’s all part of why we initiated this project.” To learn more about LMIT, visit www.laurentian.ca/lmit. Greater Sudbury festivals continued from page 8 In March, NLFB presented a show with Greater Sudbury’s own Barry Miles and east coast musician Ben Caplan, who was promoting his second album, Birds With Broken Wings. Festivals celebrate all artistic forms, including literature from local and Canadians authors and poets. Wordstock Sudbury Literary Festival has moved to an annual festival and the third edition takes place Nov. 3 to 4. Last year, the festival hosted award-winning author Terry Fallis, cartoonist and author Evan Munday, event planner to the stars and author Cheryl Cecchetto, along with Greater Sudbury native and comedian/ writer Sandra Shamas and others in a series of workshops and Q & A sessions, that not only showcased their talents, but honed in on the craft of writing. The seventh edition of Le salon du livre du Grand Sudbury, Sudbury’s French language book fair takes place May 4 to 7 at the Raddison Hotel and other locations across the city. Guests include acclaimed poet Patrice Desbiens, authors Suzanne Aubry, Simon Boulerice and Didier Leclair. The festival also holds 100 student workshops for French and French immersion schools. The children and family programming include Simon Boulerice, Camille Bouchard, Katia Canciani, Rhea Dufresne, Eric Peladeau, Cindy Roy and Paul Roux. Sudbury Star file photo Register Now Kindergarten to Grade 12 English and French Immersion To learn more, visit rainbowschools.ca.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 10

    10 | The Sudbury Star educaT ion Collège Boréal makes sure skills and theories being taught are right for the job market Jenn Lamothe For The Sudbury Star Support system invested in student success From his tenure as president of Collège Boréal, Pierre Riopel has a favourite memory — one that happens every year. He says, “Without hesitation — the graduation ceremonies.” It is a ceremony filled with emotion and a chance to honour students that have worked tirelessly to achieve their goal. He mentions a student that requested her seven-year-old son join her on stage, so he could see what hard work could accomplish, see students that have overcome insurmountable odds, and those that are seeing their future in a different light. “When you’re handing out diplomas, people have gone through challenges that we can’t even imagine, and they’re standing before you … this is a major accomplishment in their life; how can you not be sensitive to that?” If you look closely at each student’s diploma, you’ll notice that the president’s signature is slightly different on all. This momentous attachment to the graduation of his students has inspired Riopel to personally sign each and every certificate. That’s a great deal of handwriting. During Riopel’s time at the college, Collège Boréal received the highest satisfaction rate in the province from its graduating students for the 11th time in 14 years, and reported the highest graduation rate in Ontario for the 14th time in 15 years. The college recently launched its strategic plan for the next five years, and the contents make it clear why students are choosing Collège Boréal for their studies. Not only do students have a bilingual advantage, but also the college makes sure the skills and theories they are learning in class are right for the job market they’ll be entering. Advisory committees for each program are made up of experts and employers in each field. Students have flexibility in their learning atmosphere, and Collège Boréal has agreements with many universities, allowing their students to complete their diploma at Boréal, and then continue their education at a university with transferable credits. Riopel adds what he believes is the centre of success at Collège Boréal, “Absolutely extraordinary staff from one end of the province to the other.” A support system invested in student success will have a positive effect, and Riopel says, “The staff does want the success for these students.” Riopel will be retiring this year, leaving the college he loves to explore his options. However, he has no firm plans for what’s next in his life. “That’s part of the unknown at this point,” he says. “I have some plans for fall, a bit of travel, and I have some projects at home, we’ll see what happens.” His flexible approach to his retirement may be influenced by how focused most of his career has been. “I arrived in kindergarten in 1969 and since 1969 to 2015, was either a student, a teacher, a director of education, a principal, a college president, I was always in a teaching context, so this is the first time since 1969 that I’m not. So, that’s going to be a tough one for me.” Pierre Riopel is stepping down as president of Collège Boréal. John LaPPa The Sudbury Star

Page 1 of 3

Please wait