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Rhodos Graduation Special Edition 2011
Magazines | Education 2011-05-13 02:10:51
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    The Rhodes University Community Newsletter Rhodos Graduation Special Edition May 2011

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    Rhodos: Graduation Special Edition Produced by: Communications and Marketing Division Co-Editors: Cathy Gush Zamuxolo Matiwana Writers: Jeannie McKeown Cathy Gush Zamuxolo Matiwana Photography Editor: Sophie Smith Photographers: Sophie Smith Caeri Dunnell Greaves Photography Zamuxolo Matiwana Design & Production: Sally Dore Community Engagement award spurs recipient to do more Community Engagement should not be something you do to tick boxes, or to score points. Community Engagement should be something you do because you want to. So says Mr Mandla Gagayi, Assistant Sports Manager at Rhodes University and winner of the 2011 Vice-Chancellor's Community Engagement Award. Mr Gagayi's involvement with the local community dates back to 2006, when he decided to do something about the lack of sporting opportunities for young people in the township, and started soccer and netball leagues at the high schools. It began informally, outside of his job at Rhodes, but was such a success that it soon became more formalised. Initially, he says, they had not a cent to run the league, and most expenses came out of his own pocket. In 2007 he left Rhodes to work for the government, and the leagues, he says, "dulled a bit." However he returned to work for Rhodes at the end of 2007, and at this point the leagues were revived and became an official programme of Rhodes Sports Administration. Additionally, he put in an application for Lotto funding, and received an allocation of funds for equipment and other items. This was not a speedy process; the grant was approved in 2008 but the funds were only received in 2010 and with this he bought kit, balls and equipment for all the participating schools. Thanks to the Lotto funding the leagues are at a point where they can be self-sustaining, which pleases Mr Gagayi. His vision of community engagement incorporates empowerment very strongly, and he did not want the leagues dependent on Rhodes forever. Now that they have the necessary equipment, the leagues are being run by people from within the community, with Mr Gagayi fulfilling more of an advisory role. There have been challenges throughout. "They expect the Maths teacher to teach Maths all day and then go out onto the soccer field after class, for no extra pay." At some schools there were groups of children excited and eager to play, but with no educator there to supervise them. This problem was overcome by targeting individual educators, inspiring some to volunteer. Women educators particularly have stepped up to the challenge and there are now two schools with soccer teams run by women. Rhodes University students also get involved, and Mr Gagayi says they have up to twenty students volunteering their time on Wednesday afternoons when the leagues play. The project has grown with its members; people who learnt to play at school have now left and are active in the local leagues. Netball leagues have been set up by young women who have left school and want to continue playing. His vision of community engagement incorporates empowerment very strongly, and he did not want the leagues dependent on Rhodes forever There are still challenges, one of which is the sorry state of the soccer fields in Grahamstown East. The teams do come to Rhodes to play in tournaments, but league games are played in the township to encourage community building. When I ask how he felt on being awarded the Vice- Chancellors' prize, he laughs, and admits that he thought the initial phone call was a practical joke. It took a letter from HR to convince him, he says. He insists that the award is not just about him, but is an award for the efforts of Rhodes Sports Administration in general, and a welcome recognition of the amount of community work they do both locally and regionally. The league programme is launching in Port Alfred schools in May, because, says Mr Gagayi, now that they have this recognition they must not sit back and rest. "Now we must do even more." TWO The Rhodes University Community Newsletter

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    "Drama acts as a window onto the world" Dr Anton Krueger, Lecturer in the Rhodes University Drama Department, is the recipient of the 2010 Vice-Chancellor's Book Award for his academic work Experiments in Freedom: Issues of Identity in New South African Drama. The book focuses on plays written after 1994 and according to the blurb: "(It) examines ways in which identities have been represented in recent South African play texts published in English. It begins by exploring descriptions of identity from various philosophical, psychological and anthropological perspectives and elaborates ways in which drama is uniquely suited to represent - as well as to effect - transformations of identity." The holder of a D.Litt from the University of Pretoria, Dr Krueger is no newcomer to the literary scene. With a number of highly successful plays to his credit, among them Living in Strange Lands, which was nominated for the prestigious FNB Vita Award, he has also engaged in other genres. His first poetry collection, Everyday Anomalies, is, due out later this year and his 2010 novella, Sunnyside Sal, garnered positive reviews. Experiments in Freedom is his first full-length foray into academic writing and is, in fact, his doctoral thesis. He received the PhD in 2008, but it has taken a couple of years for the book to reach its final form. With a disarming grin, he explains that this is mostly due to his habit of constantly tweaking the text, and his tendency to send printers' proofs back with yet more changes marked. In fact, during the publication process for Sunnyside Sal he eventually had to hire a student to assist him, the publisher's own typesetter having refused to make any further changes. Dr Krueger is modest about winning the award, having, no idea how many other books were published by Rhodes academics in 2010. It may, he says, have been a very short shortlist indeed. However, he was gratified to receive the award, both for the recognition it brings and the fact that impecunious academics appreciate awards with cash prizes attached. A reviewer noted of Experiments in Freedom that Dr Krueger's conclusions seem to be the opposite of what he expected to find. South African identity, as presented by playwrights, appears to still be mired in the delineations of the apartheid era. He elucidates on this, saying that his book mentions several times that even now, seventeen years after the 1994 watershed, many things in our society still come down to race. He refers to the fact that on many application forms, the tickboxes asking about race still exist, and we still tick Graduation Special Edition | May 2011 He thinks for a moment about this, then offers: "I suppose it means that there's never really a perfect way to say something; you can never really decide that this is now a perfect sentence." them. He had held out the hope that South Africans would have liberated themselves from this self-classification by now. Dr Krueger is an easy person to interview; remarkably interesting and erudite and with a refreshing sense of the ridiculous. Indeed, Shaggy, a book of comic monologues which he has co-authored with a friend, is being published later this year. His next non-fiction project will be a collaboration with Mark Fleischman on the history of the Magnet Theatre in Cape Town. His output is prolific, despite his stated reluctance to ever declare a work completely finished. He thinks for a moment about this, then offers: "I suppose it means that there's never really a perfect way to say something; you can never really decide that this is now a perfect sentence." Drama acts as a window onto the world of others, providing a way of learning about this otherness. It functions as a method for understanding ourselves and our society. Dr Krueger has, through his plays and now his academic analyses, polished the window a little bit, allowing for a clearer view. THREE

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    Born to love the aquatic world Since an early age, Professor Alan Whitfield has been fascinated by the natural world, especially the marine environment. At the tender age of eight, he started collecting pictures of fish and brochures from aquariums, and compiled them into an album which he has kept to this day. "I believe it was something I was born with. I have three brothers and none of them had the same fascination with nature, particularly the aquatic world," he said. For all these years his greatest impetus has been discovery - "Discovering more about how the natural world operates and what we need to do to minimise negative impacts on our environment and the organisms (especially fishes) that share this world with us," he added. His career spans 35 years and so far he has published more than 130 papers. His contribution to estuarine ichthyology in South Africa was recently honoured by Rhodes University when he was awarded the prestigious Doctor of Science (DSc) during graduation. The award is based on published work by an academic who has made a significant contribution to a particular research field. Speaking about the award, he said he feels "very privileged and honoured to be a graduate of Rhodes University" (the alma mater of my father, mother and son). "The response of the graduation ceremony audience to my award was overwhelming," said Prof Whitfield. You would think that his achievements and lifetime career in estuarine ichthyology would quench Prof Whitfield's thirst for the subject. No! He is currently busy writing a book on Estuarine Fishes and Fisheries of the World together with three international academics. "We hope to finish that book within the next couple of years. I also have plans to write a book about the biology and ecology of fishes in southern African Estuaries, but that may have to wait until I retire," he said. The idea to embark on a DSc journey was influenced by the NRF's performance management system. "The NRF performance system has a specific section which requires information on what you are doing to improve your skills or qualification in your job environment. I thought that undertaking a DSc was an interesting and rewarding target to set and the performance system gives one two years to achieve the set goal," he added. The DSc award is open to any researcher/academic to apply to the University to submit a DSc for examination. "There is no supervisor, but the candidate has to submit a proposal to Faculty outlining the scope and magnitude of the contribution that is planned. Once this proposal is approved, the candidate can start collating the published papers for the DSc," Prof Whitfield explained. "I believe it was something I was born with. I have three brothers and none of them had the same fascination with nature, particularly the aquatic world, FOUR The Rhodes University Community Newsletter

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    Chemistry Department Professor churns out four PhDs Professor Tebello Nyokong, of the Rhodes University Chemistry Department, is one of our most lauded academics, with responsibility for overseeing some of the Department's most celebrated programmes. As Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Nanotechnology for the DST/NRF South African Research Chairs Initiative, and Director of the DST/Mintek Nanotechnology Innovation Centre (NIC) for Sensors, she laughingly describes her work as a factory which churns out PhDs. At any given time, Prof Nyokong is supervising a number of candidates in different stages of their doctoral research. Candidates who wish to study with her have a choice of three projects that they can join and find a niche within which to carry out their research. For funding reasons, Prof Nyokong explains, the Department cannot take on students who wish to work on research independent of the primary thrusts already established and funded. Graduation Special Edition | May 2011 The projects in which she accepts students are: the development of sensors for analysis of pollutants and of neurotransmitters; photodynamic therapy, which focuses on the treatment of cancer through the use of light; and nanotechnology. It is little wonder that this year she saw the graduation of four PhD students whom she has supervised and worked with for the past three years. In fact, she has seen as many as six of her PhD students graduate together in the past. When one considers that many students from the bigger city universities such a UJ, Wits and UKZN are now coming to Rhodes specifically to work on her teams, and that Rhodes University has an arrangement with the University of Lagos in Nigeria whereby Prof Nyokong trains their lecturers to PhD level, it is not surprising that she sees so many of her students receiving their doctoral degrees at one time. This year, all four of her graduating PhDs were from African countries: two from Nigeria, one from Zimbabwe and one from Lesotho. Prof Nyokong explains that although three of these are lecturers at universities in their home countries, and were therefore being paid by their respective institutions while they were studying here, the higher cost of living meant that she had to find additional funding for them in the form of bursaries. Sharon Moeno from Lesotho developed cancerspecific drugs, which are activated by light and thus avoid the devastating effects of chemotherapy. Utilising nanoscience, Moeno developed a double action drug system which combines cancer diagnosis and treatment in one step. Her research, says Prof Nyokong, represents a crucial step in the early diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Additionally, this research resulted in 10 publications in international journals. Tawanda Mugadza from Zimbabwe and Isaak Akinbulu from Nigeria worked on similar projects, utilising different methodologies to analyse their results. The research focused on the development of a new, efficient and cheap method for making nanomaterials. Mugadza used these nanomaterials to design extremely sensitive sensors for the detection of herbicides, with the goal of designing portable diagnostic tools for monitoring pollution. According to Prof Nyokong, this research is a first step towards nanotechnology-based water treatment. The final candidate, Taofeek Ogunbayo from Nigeria, carried out research on water purification. Safer methods of water purification are constantly being developed, and research in this field is ongoing. Ogunbayo developed new ways of water purification using sunlight, nanotechnology and harmless dyes, thus avoiding further contamination with toxic chemicals. Pictured here is PhD graduate Sharon Moeno with her supervisor, Prof Tebello Nyokong, Dr Edith Antunes, Dr Christian Litwinski (back) are members of staff of the Chemistry Department and Vice-Chancellor, Dr Saleem Badat. FIVE

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    "I am really proud of them" Professor Jimi Adesina, who has now left the Department of Sociology at Rhodes University to take up a post as Professor of Sociology at the University of the Western Cape (UWC), returned to see three of his PhD and two Masters-by-thesis candidates graduate in the 2011 Humanities Graduation Ceremony. Left to right: Dr Olusegun Oladeinde, Prof Jimi Adesina, Dr Yohanna Gandu, and Dr Ashley Sarimana. He is justifiably proud of his students, but stresses that it is more about the enormous amount of work which the students put into their research than his role as supervisor. The examiners' reports reflect the quality of the theses produced and, says Prof Adesina, "I am really proud of them." Prof Adesina takes Prof Tebello Nyokong as his inspiration, saying, "If we in the Humanities get to grips with what makes the Sciences successful in PhD output-the laboratory system-we can be as productive and make the PhD journey more collaborative and less painful for our students. After all, knowledge production is collaborative." His three PhD graduates are Yohanna Gandu, Segun Oladeinde and Ashley Sarimana. Drs Gandu and Oladeinde worked on issues related to the oil industry in Nigeria, and Dr Sarimana's thesis is on the political biography of Enos Mabuza. The two Masters graduates are Sthembiso Mungwashu and Precious Tanyanyiwa, and their theses reflect the work of the research groups that Prof Adesina started in 2009. Both students are moving on to PhD studies. One of the questions asked of supervisors is whether their newly graduated PhDs made a contribution to their discipline's body of knowledge. The examiners are unanimous that this is the case. Dr Gandu's thesis is on a neglected area of the conflict in the petroleum- rich Nigerian Delta region and Prof Adesina is hopeful that with this research, scholars and policymakers can start focusing on the hidden impact of an enclave economy on the local communities. Dr Oladeinde's thesis significantly advances the frontier of knowledge in the Labour Process debate, by examining managerial practices and work relations in the Nigerian oil industry. Dr Sarimana's thesis on Enos Mabuza, is described by Prof Adesina as "a smashing piece of intellectually rigorous contribution to South Africa's Political Sociology. The bibliography alone, as one of the examiners noted, is a treasure trove for those who wish to work in the area." The MSocSc graduates contributed equally to the body of sociological knowledge. Mungwashu's thesis fleshed out a concept developed within the Transformative Social Policy research group, namely the idea of 'State learning.' Tanyanyiwa's thesis, part of a larger NRF-funded project is, as far as Prof Adesina is aware, the first thesis on the scholarship of Professor Bernard Magubane. "Hopefully we can get those who teach Sociology in South Africa to start paying attention to the works of Magubane, Archie Mafeje, Ruth First, and Fatima Meer, among others; not simply as activists but as outstanding scholars. Perhaps then we can start overcoming the Eurocentric status anxiety that is so pervasive in our social sciences." Many of this cohort of students were members of two of Prof Adesina's new research groups, namely African Intellectual Heritage, and Transformative Social Policy. He is proud of their involvement and success, despite what he describes as a problematic environment within the Department. Prof Adesina mentions too that in his view, students are placed under unnecessary stress with regard to financial resources and that this is an area he feels should be better managed. Lastly, he thanks Dr Clayton for his support during the period of his supervision of these candidates as they worked within the newly established research groups. SIX The Rhodes University Community Newsletter

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    Significant postgrad output from BioSENS research group Professor Janice Limson, Head of Biotechnology in the Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, supervised what Dr Peter Clayton, Vice-Chancellor of Research and Development described as a large group of postgraduates, who all received their degrees in the 2011 ceremony. Prof Limson confirms that two PhD, four MSc and one Honours student graduated from her BioSENS research group. Dr Rory Brimecombe received his PhD. His study, which was described as "meticulous", shows how cost-effective treatments of nanomaterials can achieve what are the core criteria in the global sensors industry for diseases and pollutants, namely sensitivity and stability. After this important contribution to the field of nanomaterials-based sensors, he went on to design the first electro- chemical sensor for the anti-cancer agent wortmannin. Dr Brimecombe is currently a Senior Technical Manager at Diasorin, a South African company working in the area of human disease diagnostics. Dr Ronen Fogel, who graduated with his PhD, developed a model system for predicting enzyme performance while uncovering seldom explored phenomena in the field of protein immobilization. In applying his findings, he designed what Prof Limson describes as "possibly the most competitive sensor of its kind for several phenols, compounds which are amongst the most toxic pollutants worldwide." In addition, she comments that the word 'impressive' features no fewer than six times in the examiners' reports for his thesis. Dr Fogel won a prestigious Claude Leon Postdoctoral Fellowship and has not been lost to Rhodes, as he is working alongside Prof Limson for the next two years in a cancer diagnostics project. Shane Flanagan was awarded his MSc, and has this year begun his PhD studies in Prof Limson's research group. Flanagan developed a sensor system for ochratoxin A, a potent mycotoxin produced by fungi which contaminate several foods and beverages. His work also examined and optimised Graduation Special Edition | May 2011 methods for preparing carbon nanotubes for sensor applications, in a careful and thorough study. Letshego Molawa received her MSc for examining the application of commercial Spherezyme Technology, utilised for immobilising proteins in biosensor development. This research was in collaboration with the CSIR and co-supervised by Dr Justin Jordaan, a former Rhodes Biotechnology graduate. Molawa is based at the CSIR and will be starting a PhD. Mary Cromhout examined the use of new technology, namely the Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation, to rapidly assess whether drugs such as anti-cancer drugs will have any immune response. This is important in the field of drug delivery where new materials (such as nanomaterials) which can assist in targeted drug delivery are continuously under development. Cromhout's work went some way towards addressing the need for testing as to whether such materials have any adverse effects on the human body. Her research was co-supervised with Dr Adrienne Edkins and, having received her MSc, she has started her PhD in Prof Limson's research group. Sean Edwards, who received his MSc, conducted research which yielded excellent results for microbial fuel cells where, by coupling cost-effective catalysts with nanoparticles, he was able to optimise a fuel cell to yield power outputs in excess of that achieved by platinum catalysts. At the same time, the bacteria in the fuel cells are capable of degrading waste. Using living organisms to degrade waste and generate energy is a classic biotechnology process, says Prof Limson. Two of her current MSc and Honours students are continuing this research in collaboration with Mr Richard Laubscher at EBRU (Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Rhodes University), while Edwards is currently travelling through the Far East teaching Science and English. He plans to return to do a PhD. Sean Edwards (MSc), Dr Rory Brimecombe (PhD), Mary Cromhout (MSc), Dr Ronen Fogel (PhD), Prof Janice Limson, Shane Flanagan (MSc). Not in the picture Letshego Molawa (MSc) Much of the research undertaken by this cohort of graduates was funded through the Nanotochenology Innovation Centre (Sensors) programme, a DST/Mintek initiative to generate capacity in nanotechnology and in the development of sensors for health and the environment. In addition, funding was provided via the NRF, and Edwards' research was sponsored by a WWF/Eskom grant. SEVEN

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    "A beautiful privilege" Ms Corinne Knowles, who teaches the Sociology and Political & International Studies Extended Studies courses and her son, David Knowles, achieved something relatively rare when they graduated together in the 2011 Humanities Graduation ceremony. Ms Knowles received her Masters in Politics and David was awarded his BA in Philosophy and History. Ms Knowles's dissertation focused on the Womens Academic Solidarity Association (WASA), and the ways in which it uses its platform to contribute to transformation on the Rhodes University campus. Using a Judith Butler theory, she was looking for that little tipping point - the moment when transformation actually occurs. Asked if she found it, and she replies thoughtfully that she thinks she has, or, at least a way to identify it, a theoretical tool through which to understand transformation. Ms Knowles says frankly that her MA was a difficult undertaking. Working full-time, in an extremely intensive job where she not only sees her ESU students for two periods a day but also attends their lectures with them, she struggled to work on her thesis in term-time. However, in the student vacations (vac) she would "just bury herself in it, sitting for ten or twelve hours and just working" and then hand something in at the end of the vac. Did she ever get a chance to just sit back and relax. She laughs infectiously and says the writing is her relaxation. It's what she wants to do and she loves it so much that, come vac time, she can't wait to immerse herself in it. This does not mean that she is any less passionate about her teaching, and, she says, she has another, overarching passion, which is transformation. She first came to Rhodes in 2002, and became involved with WASA a couple of years later. This involvement, she explains, provided her with a way to articulate social justice issues, particularly around gender. Undertaking and completing her MA, she says, "has been a privilege, a beautiful privilege" and has allowed her to understand both power and vulnerability in amazing ways. She says it has completely changed not so much the way in which she thinks, but the way in which she can think. Ms Knowles' son, David, is a musician, and spent a couple of years traveling in the UK, exploring his music. When he returned to South Africa, he began studying towards a B.Mus, and picked up Philosophy as an extra subject. He then found it was Philosophy that was imparting the skills he needed to hone the messages he wanted to send through his lyrics and his music, and changed his degree to a BA. David is passionate about the environment, and is now doing his Honours in History and Politics, hoping to develop ways of enabling people to change their attitude to environmental issues. Ms Knowles is presently finishing her Assessors Course and during the interview she had an academic paper on her computer screen that was in the process of being written. She is also, "thinking thinking, thinking" about what to select as her PhD topic. This, she says, is the creative time, when she can explore her ideas before making a final decision. It has been a very special experience, to be so immersed in scholarly endeavour, and to share that experience with a child who is also serious about finding meaning and finding truth What has it felt like to be studying concurrently and graduating together with her son? Ms Knowles has nothing but good things to say about it. "It has been a very special experience, to be so immersed in scholarly endeavour, and to share that experience with a child who is also serious about finding meaning and finding truth. We have established new and important ways to relate to each other because of this," she concludes. EIGHT The Rhodes University Community Newsletter

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    Passion for art This year's cohort of Bachelor of Fine Arts graduates garnered an impressive 17 distinctions among them. One of the seventeen is Ivy Kulundu, whose final exhibition, entitled Breaking Water, represents not only the completion of her BFA, but also a major life change: the transition to motherhood. In her own words, quoted in the Rhodes Fine Art Graduate Exhibitions catalogue, she explains: "This exhibition explores the transient nature of one's physicality and emotions. Using ice as a metaphor for change - which is inevitable, unavoidable and an integral part of life - I attempt to visually articulate my emotional and physical journey during pregnancy." Kulundu initially studied Law at university. Having completed her LLB, she went into legal practice for two years, hoping, she says, to grow to love it. However, this didn't happen, and she decided to return to university to study towards her BFA. Art is her passion, she says with a smile. Initially she found it challenging but did settle well, and thoroughly enjoyed her first three years. And then, at the beginning of her fourth and final year, she and her boyfriend of seven years (now her husband) found out that she was pregnant. This presented a challenge. People close to her encouraged her to take a year off, and return to complete the degree after the baby was born. Kulundu did give this idea due consideration, but had a feeling that if she did so, she would never in fact return to her studies. Instead she decided to incorporate her pregnancy, and her unborn baby, into her art and in doing so she found herself approaching her work in an ever more passionate and driven way. Her final project for her degree related strongly to pregnancy, and the unknown territory into which she was embarking. Her choice of Graduation Special Edition | May 2011 installation/performance and digital components "highlights the multiple levels and layers of being in utero, as well as the blur between the private and public experience faced." Kulundu decided to work with ice, feeling that it was the ideal medium through which to represent the change she could feel happening within herself from day to day. Her installation consisted of nine ice sculptures hanging from the ceiling, embedded in which were empty frames, to represent the unknown. Kulundu says some of the questions in her mind were along the lines of wondering what sort of personality her daughter would have, and what kind of relationship they would have with each other. In addition, she had six huge ice blocks on the floor, which she used as her canvas. Using stop-frame animation, she projected onto them images of her changing belly, with focus particularly on the navel. As the ice blocks, both those hanging from the ceiling and those on the floor, were in the process of melting and disintegrating, her metaphor of change, and of constant flux, was well represented by her chosen medium. Her baby was due during the time when her exhibition was running, and everyone was praying that the name of the exhibition would not prove Ivy Kulundu's exhibition, entitled Breaking Water. to be prophetic. Obligingly, Luna, she of the wide, wondering dark eyes, complied, and arrived six days later. She credits Luna as her inspiration; towards the end of her pregnancy and her final year, she admits she was probably a little obsessed. Then again, she admits, she probably had to be, to get it all finished. She knows that people were concerned that she was over-exerting herself, but, "with the support of my friends and family," she says, "I succeeded in what I wanted to do." NINE

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    More black students graduate in 2011 This year, 2 045 students from six faculties were awarded degrees, diplomas and certificates during the graduation ceremonies in April. Some 1 151 students received undergraduate degrees and 44% were awarded postgraduate qualifications. The Faculty of Humanities graduated the largest number of graduates at 808 students, while Commerce produced 483, Science 359, Education 268, Law 64 and Pharmacy 63. Addressing the audience, Vice-Chancellor, Dr Saleem Badat, reminded the new graduates that when they joined Rhodes University, they were told that "at Rhodes learning and education is a partnership of mutual commitment to the pursuit of knowledge and understanding, to the development of expertise and skills, and to the embracing of appropriate values and attitudes". He said their achievement is a testimony that they have fulfilled their role in this partnership. "You have displayed the necessary commitment to learn, to acquire knowledge and to develop expertise," he said. "Your accomplishment, the fruit of years of toil, is a fantastic achievement in the face of a higher education system that struggles to realise the talents and potential of all our students." Dr Badat said he trusts that the students will acknowledge the role and contribution of all the people who made it possible for them to graduate - such as lecturers and tutors, laboratory assistants and computer technicians, administrators and wardens, cooks, cleaners and gardeners. "All of these people labour to create a special intellectual, social and physical environment at Rhodes to support you and to enable you to succeed," he added. The University was pleased to witness the gradual increase in the number of black graduates compared to 2009 and 2010. In 2011, 815 black students graduated compared to 724 in 2010 and 712 in 2009. The Faculty of Humanities graduated the largest number of graduates at 808 students, while Commerce produced 483, Science 359, Education 268, Law 64 and Pharmacy 63 Quotes from some of the Honorary Doctorate recipients Dr George Bizos "We may be blamed for not having foreseen that we could not within a period of sixteen years wipe out the injustices perpetrated for over three centuries to the vast majority of the people of South Africa. Some who have lost privileges wrongly complain that they have been deprived of their rights." Dr Lillian Congo "Wellness to most people means being Physically well, free from any disease, from any illness, perhaps brought to this state by exercise and good nutrition. Also this Wellness is supposed to mean a healthy balance of body, mind and spirit, consequently resulting in an overall feeling of Wellbeing." TEN The Rhodes University Community Newsletter

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