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HW Seta Skills and Career Guide
Catalogs | Education 2011-05-26 07:25:28
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    SECTOR SKILLS & CAREER GUIDE (including Scarce and Critical Skills) 1st Edition ISBN - 978-0-620-50225-2 Published by: Proverto Educational Publishers Postal Address: Private Bag X 2, Suite 137, Helderkruin, Roodepoort, South Africa, 1733 Street Address: Tuscan Office Park, Cor Mimosa and Ruhamah Street, Helderkruin, Roodepoort, South Africa Tel: (011) 764 - 4794 Fax: (011) 764 - 6245 Website: http://www.proverto.co.za (download this Guide free on www.proverto.co.za) Advertising and Sponsorship: Alice Towson Cell: 082 45 46 214 E-mail: alice@proverto.co.za Editor / Compiler: Chris van Blerk Design & Layout: Madi van Schalkwyk Copyright © Proverto Educational Publishers HWSETA Information: Tel: (011) 607 6900 Fax: (011) 616 8939 E-mail Address: hwseta@hwseta.org.za Website: http://www.hwseta.org.za Postal Address: Private Bag X 15, Gardenview 2047 higher education & training Department: Higher Education and Training REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

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    Content Page Learning Programme Options and Careers in the Health and Social Development Sector 2 What is the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) 2 The HWSETA and Learnerships 2 What is a Learnership? 2 The benefits of a learnership ? 3 Further benefits of a learnership 3 How can I be assured of the quality of a learnership? 3 Joining a learnership if you are unemployed 3 How to enter a learnership 3 How are learnerships funded? 3 Existing Learnerships, qualifications and skills programmes that are registered with or offered by the HWSETA Table 4 Registered qualifications with the HWSETA 5 Key occupations for funding in the next five years, scarce and critical skills 6 The funding of learnerships 7 Employed learners 8 Unemployed learners 8 Possible careers (occupations) within the Health and Social Development Sectors 8 Introduction 8 Choice of study 8 Qualifications 9 Information about possible careers 9 Summary of possible careers 10 - 28 Important information for the learner 29

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    2 This career and learner guide provides an overview of learning programmes and specifically looks at occupational qualifications and learnerships that are currently registered under the HWSETA. This guide also gives an overview of possible career options for prospective students and learners. LEARNING PROGRAMME OPTIONS AND CAREERS IN THE HEALTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SECTOR Introduction Learning programmes are learning activities associated with curriculum implementation and lead to the achievement of a particular qualification or part qualification as defined by the South African Qualification Authority (SAQA). The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) provides opportunities for the employed and unemployed to gain theoretical learning and structured work experience through learnership programmes and skills programmes. What is the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)? The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) is one of the SETAs (Sector Education and Training Authorities) established by the Minister of Labour, Mr MMS Mdladlana, on 20 March 2000 to realize the goals of the Skills Development Act of 1998. The HWSETA operates in the health and social development sectors and supports the philosophy of a better life for all through people development. THE HWSETA and Learnerships One of the key objectives of the HWSETA is to develop and administer learnerships and to assist new entrants into employment in the labour market. It also supports the implementation of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). The learnership campaign is one of the processes that will ensure that the commitment of the South African Qualifications Authority or SAQA, which oversees the further development of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), is seen to be a vital component of learnerships now and in the future. The NQF contributes to the full development of each learner and to the social and economic development of the nation at large. What is a Learnership Learnerships can be defined as new professional and vocational education and training programmes. It is designed to develop the skills and knowledge of an individual. They combine theoretical and experiential learning from a nominated provider and leads to a qualification that is registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). A person who successfully completes a learnership will have a qualification that will represent occupational competence and which is recognised throughout the country. Learnerships attempt to minimise the skills gaps so that people can be more employable and are intended to address the gap between current education, training and needs of the labour market. It also addresses unequal access to education, training and employment opportunities and the skills shortage in our country.

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    The benefits of a learnership * Receive a learner allowance * Have a fixed term employment contract for the duration of the learnership * Once you've completed the learnership you will get a recognized qualification on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) based on your practical and theoretical knowledge * Have gained experience in the relevant field Further benefits of a learnership For the learner * A nationally recognized qualification * Practical and theoretical learning * Enhances self-esteem, career prospects and market value * Receive a learner allowance * Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) * An understanding of modern day business processes * A better chance of finding a job and work experience For the employer: * Well-trained and skilled employees * Status of a preferred employer * Tax incentives * Increased productivity, quality and profitability * Possible access to a discretionary grant How can I be assured of the quality of a learnership? * Quality management and assurance are integral to learnerships * Learnerships are registered with the Department of Labour * Learnerships undergo a thorough evaluation process * Employers as workplace providers and assessors become accredited by the ETQA Division of HWSETA. This ensures that the workplace is a centre of quality for the provision of education Joining a learnership if you are unemployed If unemployed people want to join a learnership they must use the following steps: Step 1: Decide what skills you want Step 2: Register as a work-seeker at the Department of Labour Step 3: Find employers that offer learnerships Step 4: Draw up a CV Step 5: Contact potential employers in your area by sending a one page CV asking to be admitted to a learnership Step 6: Prepare for an interview if invited How to enter a learnership * To implement a learnership, an employer, a learner and training provider must enter into a contract * The training provider can be an outsourced consultant, training institution or your company, responsible for the learners theoretical training * An employer must receive confirmation of funding by HWSETA before commencement on a learnership * An expression of interest document must be completed and approved by HWSETA before commencement How are learnerships funded? * Any employer who pays a levy to HWSETA may apply for financial support to implement learnership * The HWSETA will decide on the criteria for funding Learnership agreements and funding must be approved by the HWSETA before the commencement of training 3

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    4 Learnership intake Criteria as per NSDS Targets: 85% Black 54% Female 4% Persons with disabilities Existing Learnerships, qualifications and skills programmes that are registered with or offered by the HWSETA As indicated by the table below, currently, 13 learnerships had been registered by HWSETA. The learnerships were spread across NQFL 1 to 6 with the majority at level 4. In addition, 13 qualifications are currently registered by the HWSETA showing sub-sector coverage, NQF level, credits, and SAQA ID. Learnership Title NQF Level DoL Registration No GETC Certificate in Ancillary Healthcare 1 11 Q 110011 31 125 1 Certificate in General Nursing (Auxiliary) 4 11 Q 110008 20 132 4 Certificate in General Nursing (Enrolled) 4 11 Q 110003 00 132 4 Diploma in General Nursing (Bridging) 5 11 Q 110004 00 256 5 Post Basic Diploma in Medical / Surgical Nursing (Elective: Critical Care / Operating Theatre Nursing) 6 11 Q 110010 17 360 6 FETC Certificate in Social Auxiliary Work 4 11 Q 110012 00 180 4 Diagnostic Radiography 6 11 Q 110013 00 360 6 FETC Certificate: Phlebotomy Techniques 4 11 Q 110006 28 134 4 Diploma in Primary Healthcare 6 11 Q 110009 23 360 6 Diploma: Medical Technology 5 11 Q 110005 00 120 5 Community Health Worker 3 11 Q 110016 27 120 3 National Certificate: Theology and Ministry 2 11 Q 110017 30 120 2 FETC Certificate: Counselling 4 11 Q 110018 69 140 4

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    Registered qualifications with the HWSETA * National Certificate: Fundamental Ancillary Health Care: Learners with this qualification will be able to promote and provide for health within a community. They will provide a service that will assist communities to manage their own health and wellness. It will provide the foundation for a certificate in Ancillary Health Care Level 3. The qualification is at NQF Level 2 and is worth 154 credits. * National Certificate: Occupational Health, Safety, and Environment: Details for this qualification is not available at this time. The qualification is at NQF 2 level and is worth 120 credits. * National Certificate: Theology and Ministry: This qualification recognizes those with the competence to serve as lay and ordained leaders in Christian communities or society through enabling them to obtain providing them with a nationally registered and recognized qualification. It is at NQF Level 2 and is worth 120 credits. * National Certificate: Victim Empowerment and Support: Learners with this qualification at NQF Level 2 will apply an understanding of the Victim Empowerment sector to empower him/ herself and the community. This is an entry-level qualification within a career pathway for Victim Empowerment to NQF Level 4. It is worth 120 credits. * National Certificate: Occupational Hygiene and Safety: Details for this qualification are not available at this time. It is offered at NQF Level 3 and is worth 144 credits. * National Certificate: Victim Empowerment: The qualification is the second within the Victim Empowerment career pathway. The qualifying learner will apply an in-depth understanding of the Victim Empowerment Sector specifically with regard to implementing early interventions that focus on individuals, groups, and communities. The learner is required to work under the supervision of a registered mental health professional. It is offered at NQF Level 3 and earns 127 credits. * Further Education and Training Certificate (FETC): Child and Youth Care Work: This qualification is an entry-level qualification for those who want to enter the field of Child and Youth Care Work (C&YCW) as potential career. It includes practical experience and community-based learning and equips people for their roles as auxiliary child and youth care workers. It is offered at NQF Level 4 and is worth 165 credits. * FETC: Community Development: HIV and AIDS Support: The qualification is intended for lay counsellors who will educate and provide counselling to communities about the HIV and AIDS pandemic. Offered at NQF Level 4, it is worth 155 credits. * FETC: Counselling: Learners are trained to meet the needs of a wide variety of work roles including social auxiliary workers, traditional healers, trauma counsellors, HIV and AIDS counsellors, career counsellors, and health and wellness practitioners. It is worth 140 credits and is offered at NQF Level 4. In simple terms, credits can be defined as a collective volume of learning required for a qualification in terms of the minimum number of credits required at specific exit levels of the NQF. For instance, generally one credit is equivalent to ten notional study hours. In higher education, an average full-time student undergraduate is expected to study for a 40 hour week, thus requiring a minimum credit load of 120 credits per academic year for a Certificate, Diploma and Bachelor's degree; and 180 credits per academic year for Masters Degree and beyond. (www.nqf.org.za) 5

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    6 * FETC: Gender Practice: The qualification offered at NQF Level 4 will contribute to empowering learners and provide them with increasing awareness within the framework of gender equality and women's empowerment. It provides learners with a formal qualification that allows for recognition, further education, and training opportunities as well as continued professional and personal development. It is worth 152 credits. * FETC: Occupational Hygiene and Safety: Details for this qualification are not available at this time. It is offered at NQF Level 4 and can earn 145 credits. * FETC: Probation Work: This is an entrylevel qualification for those who want to enter the field of Probation Work as potential career. It allows for entry 'from the workplace' instead of taking an academic route. It builds on practical experience and community-based learning and equips people for their roles as assistant probation officers. It is worth 142 credits and is offered at NQF Level 4. * FETC: Social Auxiliary Work: Offered at level 4 (180 credits), qualifying learners are equipped with basic knowledge and understanding of the South African context within which social services are provided and social development in terms of the needs, policies, and the role of the social auxiliary worker. * FETC: Social Security Administration: It is suitable for any individual who is or wishes to be involved in the administration function within the Social Security sector. It is offered at NQF Level 4 and is worth 140 credits. * FETC: Theology and Ministry: The Certificate recognizes those who have the required competence to serve as lay and ordained leaders in Christian communities. It aims to produce life-long theological learners equipped to raise and debate current issues in an African context. It further seeks to transform persons, churches, and society dealing with power issues such as gender, social economic disparity, and disability. Offered at NQF Level 4 it is worth 120 credits. * FETC: Victim Empowerment Coordination: At NQF Level 4, the qualification is the third within the Victim Empowerment career pathway. It enhances the scope and quality of Victim Empowerment services in South Africa and provides Victim Empowerment service providers, primarily in the NGO and CBO sectors, with the necessary knowledge and skills to provide direct services and co-ordinate Victim Empowerment programmes. It is worth 146 credits. * National Certificate: Primary Response in Emergencies: Details for this qualification are not available at this time. It is offered at NQF Level 4 and is worth 142 credits. KEY OCCUPATIONS FOR FUNDING IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS The following occupations, as indicated by the list below need funding in the next five years in the health and social development sectors and they have been identified as scarce by employers HEALTH: Scarce and Critical Skills * Pharmacists * Pharmacist Assistants * Doctors * Vitamin Specialists * Herbalists * Project Managers in clinical research

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    * Clinical Team Leaders * Data Team Leaders * Ultra-sound Technicians * Professional Nurses (with specialisation e.g. Theatre Nurses) * Advanced Support Paramedics * Nutritionist/Dieticians * TB Technicians * Pathology Registrarships * Pathologists * Medical Technologists * Medical Technicians * Medical Laboratory Scientists * Laboratory Technicians * Laboratory Assistants * Operation Theatre Technicians * Clerks (working in laboratories) * Ultra sound Technicians * Anaesthetics * HIV and AIDS Counselors * Advanced Midwives * Artisans working in health and social development facilities * Health and Safety Practitioners SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: Scarce and Critical Skills * Child and Youth Care Workers * Community Health Care Workers * Social Auxiliary Workers * Community Home based Care Workers * Social Workers * Community Development Workers * Probation Officers * Assistant Probation Officers * Youth Workers * Early Childhood Development Practitioners * Community HIV/AIDS Workers * Laundry Aiders A scarce skill arises from the following factors: people are unwilling to work outside of urban areas (geographical); there are no or very few candidates with the required skills (equity); people that are in education and training and are in the process of acquiring the required skills (replacement); the skill could be a new one or an emerging one, and there are no people enrolled or engaged in a process of acquiring the skill required. A critical skill is one that is required to function in a particular job within the workplace and could be addressed through "top up" training or the identification of skills gaps in the workplace. The funding of Learnerships Any company who pays a levy to the HWSETA, and submits a so-called Workplace Skills Plan and Implementation Report (WSPIR) each year, may apply for financial support to implement learnerships. The HWSETA will decide on the criteria for funding. All companies that apply will have to adhere to the criteria as determined by the HWSETA. Grants exist to support the funding of learnerships and essentially assist with the recovery of training costs. Training costs include job training, tuition fees, uniforms and text books and/or learner workbooks. A company qualifies for the grant for every learnership they participate in. There are two types of learners that can be registered on learnerships, namely: 7

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    8 * Employed learners - these persons are already employed by the company and are therefore already earning a salary. These learners are referred to as 18(1) learners. Companies will only receive a grant for training costs. * Unemployed learners - these persons have been unemployed and have now been recruited for employment for the duration of the learnership. These learners are referred to as 18(2) learners. Companies will receive a grant towards training costs, uniform (if applicable) and learner allowances for the duration of the learnership. The training provider, in this case the HWSETA, has the right to access the learner's books, learning material and workplace, if required. In turn they must provide education and training in terms of the learnership; provide the learner with the support and guidance as required; record, monitor and retain details of training; conduct off-the-job assessment, and provide reports to the employer. POSSIBLE CAREERS (OCCUPATIONS) WITHIN THE HEALTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SECTORS Introduction Your choice of career will shape your life, so make sure you take the time to start looking at your options. Many young South Africans only have limited access to reliable information on their options for education and training after school, careers and career pathways and employment and self-employment opportunities. The aim of this section is to assist you in making informed choices about your (work)life and your future by providing career related information. Choice of study To guide you in making the perfect choice of study, there are certain steps that you may follow to find out what type of career suits you best: Step 1: Understand what qualification options are available to you (for example, degree, diploma, certificate or learnership). Step 2: You can browse the Careers and Occupations Reference Directory for Young People to see what qualification you would need for your career choice and decide on the most practical and best suited for you, among others, a university, university of technology, Further Education and Training (FET) College or learnership. Descriptions of qualifications are given further down this page. Step 3: Once you have decided on the educational route, get as much information as possible on important issues such as admission requirements, deadlines for application, fees, bursary schemes or loans available and duration of study. Step 4: If you do not have the funds to attend the course or programme of your choice, see if you are eligible for a bursary, a student loan or a scholarship. Step 5: Once you have reached your decision, do not delay to apply. Many educational institutions have strict closing dates for applications. You can also visit www.gostudy.co.za, a good career choice site offered by Pace Career Centre. They also give the most recent list of universities, universities of technology, FET colleges, private institutions and short courses as well as information on programmes, study fees, residences and even online applications.

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