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Health and Wellfare Seta :: Sector Skills and Career Guide
Catalogs | Education 2012-08-27 02:23:09
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    Chiropractic is a health profession specializing in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the effects of these disorders on the function of the nervous system and general health. Chiropractic practitioners essentially rely upon non-invasive treatment methods and will refer patients to medical practitioners should medication or surgery be indicated. This approach is further reinforced by chiropractors in their promotion of healthy lifestyles such as the avoidance of smoking and excess stress, proper diet and exercise. Chiropractic education and training is extensive and in South Africa a Masters Degree in Chiropractic is awarded after a six year program at either the Durban University of Technology, or the University of Johannesburg. PRIMARY CONDITIONS TREATED Back pain, neck pain and headaches are extremely common and can be very debilitating symptoms. They are also the primary reason patients seek chiropractic care. The distinguishing features of chiropractic care that has allowed for having patient and public acceptance has been the ability to provide a readily available, caring and sympathetic, low cost, low risk, non-invasive and natural healing approach to relieving symptoms of back pain, neck pain and certain types of headache. The basic treatment offered by chiropractors is relatively quick and inexpensive. In South Africa the majority of medical schemes make provision for reimbursement of chiropractic services. The Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act provides for complete reimbursement of cases treated by registered chiropractors. The typical use of chiropractic care by knowledgable patients is to seek care during flare-ups of pain and limiting the care to a few treatments per episode. Using this level of restraint, chiropractic care is less expensive than other treatment options where a series of examinations, medication and diagnostic procedures are often routinely utilized. COST EFFECTIVE CARE Considering the high costs of medical care in the case of back related problems - more often resulting in extensive diagnostic procedures, medication, surgery and hospitalisation - it makes economical sense to encourage patients to seek a more cost effective route which could save medical schemes and our country millions of Rands annually. It is interesting to note that the Ministry of Health in Ontario - Canada - commissioned a study by three health economists led by Prof Pran Manga to investigate the cost of back related problems to the state. The 216-page report listed several findings that could save Ontario billions of dollars (approximately $7 billion) annually by utilising chiropractic services. Prof. Manga stated, "There is an overwhelming body of evidence indicating that chiropractic management of low-back pain is more cost effective than medical management". LOW BACK PAIN Low Back Pain has reached epidemic proportions in virtually all industrialised nations and is ranked second only to headaches as the most frequently reported cause of pain. Several studies estimate that up to 90% of all people will experience back pain at some stage of their lives, and treatment has become,, in turn, the single biggest headache for the medical profession. A British orthopaedic surgeon, Gordon Waddel in his acclaimed new text "The Back Pain Revolution" states back pain is a 20th Century medical disaster. In national health care systems throughout the world back pain is common, poorly managed and very expensive - both in terms of direct treatment costs and the indirect costs of disability and lost productivity. Several professions share the responsibility of health care and each should be considered equally in respect of the service rendered. Chiropractic fulfils a vital role in healthcare and can substantially contribute to healthcare at an effective and cost-effective level. Information made available by: The Chiropractic Association of SA Tel & Fax: 058 303 4571 E-mail: drreg@mweb.co.za casa1@telkomsa.net Website: www.chiropractic.co.za

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    NICDAM (NATIONAL INSTITUTE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGE- MENT) TRUST is a well-established educational and development Trust operating through teamwork and partnerships to support individuals, communities, organisations, government and businesses. NICDAM Trust's mission is to contribute to the development of Southern African communities, through SAQA accredited training programmes, community development programmes, government support programmes and social research. NICDAM has, in order to comply with the provisions of the Further Education and Training Colleges Act, No 16 of 2006, established the NICDAM COMMUNITY COLLEGE (PTY) LTD. Registration No 2012/FE07/014 which is wholly owned by the NICDAM Trust and which is set up for non-profit purposes. NICDAM Trust is registered as: * An educational and development trust on 11/08/1999 with the Master of the High Court-registration number-IT10178/99. * A non-profit organisation on 18 May 2000-registration number NPO 007-918. * A fully Accredited Training Provider with SAQA through the HWSETA (No HW592PA05000123), MERSETA and ETDP SETA. * A Public Benefit Organisation during 2004 - No. 930011671 * A member of Proudly South African during 2004 - No. ME040909/22 * Obtained BBBEE Certification Level 3 NICDAM CAN PRESENT ALL OUR TRAINING NATIONALLY AT VENUES CONVENIENT TO OUR LEARNERS. WE PRESENT THE FOLLOWING: QUALIFICATION TITLE LEVEL SHORT COURSES AND CPD COURSES 49606 GETC: Ancillary Health 1 LEARNING PROGRAMMES Report writing in Probation Work: Aligned to Unit Standard 254185 Apply basic Care Conduct outcomes-based assessment HCBC Capacity Building and mentoring programme including the skills programme: Manage- 64749 NC: Community Health Work 64149 NC:Occupational Health, Safety and Environment 49279 NC: Vic im Empowerment and Support 64769 NC: Community Health Work 49688 NC: Vic im Empowerment 64697 FETC: Community Heal h Work 74410 FETC: Public Awareness Promotion of Dread 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 Conduct moderation of outcomes-based assessments Victim Empowerment (several short courses) Trauma Counselling And Management (several short courses) Child & Youth Care (several short courses) HIV & AIDS Home Based Care Frail Care First Aid Youth Development Organisational Development And Capacity Building Community Development ment training for CBO's (for HIV/AIDS coordinators) (15 CPD points) Implementation of the Child Justice Act-Assessment and Diversion: Aligned toUnit Standard 114012 Provide a caring environment for youth in conflict wi h the law. (15 CPD points) Advanced Counselling Skills- Applying a counselling relationship in a therapeutic environment: Aligned to Unit Standard 117860 Apply knowledge of interpersonal relationships to enhance the effectiveness of the counselling process. (15 CPD points) HIV/AIDS information for Social Workers: Aligned to Unit Standard 25210 Demonstrateknowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS, other sexually transmitted Infections (STI's) and Tuberculosis (TB) for counselling purposes (15 CPD points) HIV/AIDS counselling and support in Social Work: Aligned to Unit Standard 252532 Provide ongoing counselling and support to individuals infected or affected by HIV/AIDS. (15 CPD points) Victim Empowerment: Aligned to Unit Standard 117889 Demonstrate an understanding of Victim Empowerment. (15 CPD points) Trauma Management: Aligned to Unit Standard 114942 Describe how to manage reactions arising from a traumatic event (15 CPD points) Disease and HIV/AIDS Computer Literacy Training Human Trafficking: Aligned to Unit Standard 365139 Demonstrate an understanding of hu- 49256 FETC: Counselling 4 Counselling (various short courses) man trafficking and its legal implications (15 CPD points) 60209 FETC: Child and Youth Care 49872 FETC: Victim Empower- 4 4 Migration Rights Numeracy and Literacy Learning programme development Child and youth care work - The Developmental Assessment: Aligned to Unit Standard 254186 Participate in a developmental assessment (15 CPD points) Therapeutic work with children and youth at risk: Aligned to Unit Standard 254174 Demonstrate knowledge of he developmental approach to therapeutic work with children and youth at ment Co-ordination Basic Bookkeeping risk (15 CPD points) Gender Based Violence: Aligned to Unit Standard 117884 Demonstrate an understanding of NATIONAL AND GAUTENG OFFICES 89 Erasmus Ave Raslouw Estates Centurion, Pretoria/Tshwane P.O. Box 54282 Wierdapark Centurion, 0149 gender violence (15 CPD points) CPD COURSE IN REGISTRATION PROCESS Supporting victims of sexual offences: Aligned to Unit Standard 119725 Provide support to Telephone number: (012) 656-7014/84 Registrar victims of sexual offences (15 credits) National number: 0861 - NICDAM (642326) 082-774-6679 Fax number (012) 656-8458 E-mail address nicdam@nicdam.co.za Website www.nicdam.co.za Koos Sadie Cell: 082 334 8620 Managing Trustee SC Le Roux Cell: 082 454 4420 Supporting child vic ims: Aligned to Unit Standard 120081 Provide support to victims of abuse, neglect and exploitation. (15 credits) Support to victims of serious violent crimes: Aligned to Unit Standard 120079 Provide support to victims of serious violent crimes. (15 credits)

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    SECTOR SKILLS & CAREER GUIDE (including Scarce and Critical Skills) 2012 - Third Printing ISBN - 978-0-620-50225-2 Published by: Proverto Educational Publishers Postal Address: Private Bag X 2, Suite 137, Helderkruin, Roodepoort, South Africa, 1733 Street Address: Tuscan Office Park, Cor Mimosa and Ruhamah Street, Helderkruin, Roodepoort, South Africa Tel: (011) 764 - 4794 Fax: (011) 764 - 6245 Website: http://www.proverto.co.za (download this Guide free on www.proverto.co.za) Advertising and Sponsorship: Alice Towson Cell: 082 45 46 214 E-mail: alice@proverto.co.za Editor / Compiler: Chris van Blerk Design & Layout: Madi van Schalkwyk Copyright © Proverto Educational Publishers HWSETA Information: Tel: (011) 607 6900 Fax: (011) 616 8939 E-mail Address: hwseta@hwseta.org.za Website: http://www.hwseta.org.za Postal Address: Private Bag X 15, Gardenview 2047 higher education & training Department: Higher Education and Training REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA 3

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    Content Page Terminology and Abbreviations 2 Introduction and Preface 4 Chapter One (1) 5 Profile of the HWSETA and Sector 5 The Skills Development Act 5 Function of a Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) 6 Function of an ETQA 6 The HWSETA's Mandate and Key Objectives 7 The Skills Revolution 7 SIC Codes within the HWSETA umbrella Table 8 The HWSETA Stakeholders 10 The HWSETA and Learnerships 10 HWSETA registered Learnerhips Table 11 HWSETA Skills Programmes 12 New Qualifications /learning programmes 12 The funding of learnerships 12 Which grants and incentives are available? 13 Financial incentives for occupation-focused learning 14 Tax Rebates 14 Chapter Two (2) 15 The Organising Framework for Occupations (OFO): Occupational profiles 15 How is the OFO implemented? 15 Workplace Skills Plans (WSPs) and implementation reports (WSPIRs) 15 The Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) 16 Which organisations submit WSPs? 16 Content Page What are the benefits of completing and submitting a WSP? 16 Overview of the WSPIR submission 17 The Skills Development Facilitator (SDF) 17 Requirements and functions of an SDF 17 Registering with the HWSETA as an SDF 18 The Training Committee 18 Objectives 18 Scarce and Critical Skills 18 Chapter Three (3) 20 The new Sector Skills Plan (SSP) development process 20 The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) 20 Chapter Four (4) 21 The National Qualifications Framework (NQF) - the work of the OCTO and the NOPF 21 The National Qualifications Framework (NQF) 21 NQF Objectives 21 The structure of the NQF (National Qualifications Framework), Table 22 The work of the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) 23 Why is the OCTO being established? 24 How will the policy changes result in an improved response to skills shortages? 24 The National Occupational Pathways Framework (NOPF) 25 Purpose of the NOPF 25 What will the QCTO qualifications consist of? 25 Contact information for the Skills Development Planning (SDP) Division 27

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    2 Explanation of terminology and list of abbreviations OFO - Organising Framework for Occupations. The OFO is a tool for having a common language for collecting and analysing labour market information. It is a skills-based classification system which captures all jobs in the form of occupations, groups occupations based on similarity of skills specialisation and the skills level. The Skills Development Act (No 97 of 1998) provides a strategic, planned approach to link education and training to the changing needs of the economy. The Skills Development Act establishes SETAs and requires all SETAs to apply to the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) for accreditation as an ETQA SETAs - Sector Education and Training Authorities. The economy has been divided into 22 functional sectors, each of which is served by a SETA, which are advisory bodies on education and training. SETAs are financed from skills development levies, interest and penalties collected from employers. They are governed by stakeholders in the sector with equal representation of both organised employers and labour. SAQA - South African Qualifications Authority. The SAQA Act establishes the NQF and creates Education and Training Quality Assurance Bodies (ETQAs) NQF - National Qualifications Framework. The NQF is the set of principles and guidelines within which nationally recognised qualifications are registered and in terms of which records of learner achievement are registered. The NQF can help you choose the right qualification and provider for your careers ETQA - Education and Training Quality Assurance. It is the ETQA, which accredits companies and providers to educate and train, register assessors and provide external moderation HWSETA - Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority. The HWSETA has been established to facilitate skills development in the health and social development sector to ensure that the skills needs are identified and addressed through a number of initiatives by the SETA and the sector SSP - Sector Skills Plan. Sector Skill Plans (SSPs) are the planning tools by which the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) III impacts our country at a practical level. NSDS - National Skills Development Strategy. The NSDS defines the national strategy for the development of skills across all economic sectors. It also prescribes specific objectives and targets that all SETAs as a collective need to address. NSDS III will be implemented on 1 April 2011

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    OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-Framework NQPF - National Occupational Pathways Framework QCTO - The Quality Council for Trade and Occupations. The main role of the QCTO will be to establish and manage its sub-framework to ensure quality in the design, and development of occupational qualifications and in the delivery, assessment and certification processes required to develop occupational competence in accordance with labour market skills needs NSA - National Skills Authority. The National Skills Authority advises the Minister of Higher Education and Training on a national skills development policy and strategy. WSP - A Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) is a plan for Education and Training in the workplace. All companies that are registered with the HWSETA should submit a WSP, which will qualify them for a Mandatory Grant (for levy paying companies only) and the Sector Priority Discretionary Grant (for levy exempt companies only). The due date for submission of the WSP to HWSETA is 30 June each year. OLS - Occupational Learning System. The entire value chain of occupational learning, collectively referred to as the Occupational Learning System. Skills levels are determined by the level or amount of formal education and training, the amount of previous experience in a related occupation and the amount of on-the-job training required to competently perform the set of tasks required for that occupation. A skill specialisation is defined in terms of the range and complexity of tasks, field of knowledge required, tools or equipment used, materials worked on or information worked with and goods for services provided. 3

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    Skills development is about changing people's lives, about enhancing their employability and about aligning skills to our economy. The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) has been established to facilitate skills development in the health and social development sector to ensure that the skills needs are identified and addressed through a number of initiatives by the SETA and the sector. The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) serves to promote education and training for the overall development of the health and social development sectors. It also supports the implementation of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). In short, the NQF is the set of principles and guidelines by which records of learner achievement are registered to enable national recognition of acquired skills and knowledge, thereby ensuring an integrated system that encourages life-long learning. One way in which the HWSETA endeavours to address the skills need and facilitates skills development in the sector, is to support and administer learnerships, a work-based form of education. At a more practical level, Joint 4 Implementation Plans (JIPs) are entered into between the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and SETAs whereby the need for particular qualifications required for learnerships is identified jointly. Against the background of the new Sector Skills Plan (SSP) development process and the Skills Development Act, this publication outlines the profile and role of the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) in promoting education and training for the overall development of the health and social development sectors. It explains the Organising Framework for Occupations (OFO) and related occupational profiles that has been implemented by the HWSETA into the Work Skills Plan (WSP) and Implementation Report. An explanation of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) and the work of the QCTO is given and how this relates to the National Occupational Pathways Framework (NOPF) and assists learners, work seekers and employers with career planning. Subsequently, it discusses all aspects of learning programme options including learnerships, skills programmes and occupational qualifications to the prospective student or unemployed individual and lists the learnerships the HWSETA is offering. An explanation of financing of studies including SETA grants and incentives is also included. In conclusion the career guide in this publication provides a list and summary of all possible careers and hard to fill occupations that can be attributed to scarce skills or skills shortages in the health and social development sector. Key Objectives Vision & Mission The HWSETA espouses the philosophy of a better life for all through people development and strives to a vision for the creation of a skilled workforce to meet the health and social development needs of all people in South Africa. It endeavours to create and implement an integrated approach for the development and provision of an appropriately skilled labour force that will be empowered to render quality health and social development services that are comparable to world-class standards.

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    Profile of the HWSETA and sector Twenty five SETA's were established in the year 2000 to regulate the qualifications provided to employees. The SETA/NQF model of quality assurance was based on decentralised assessment where individual institutions are accredited to offer specific, registered qualifications. Each SETA has its own requirements for the accreditation of providers within its sector, which have to design learning programmes aligned to the registered qualifications and ensure assessment and moderation to ensure quality assurance of the system. The Skills Development Act The Skills Development Act (No 97 of 1998) embodies a strategic, planned approach to link education and training to the changing needs of the economy. The Act creates a number of new bodies to regulate and administer structured education and training within the workplace. The Skills Development Act attempts to create a policy and strategy for the benefit of workers, employers, self-employed people, public and private education and training providers. 1 The Skills Development Act seeks to: * Strategically stimulate investment in education and training in and for the workplace * Increase the supply of skills and knowledge needed by the labour market * Link learning to the demands of the world of work * Develop the skills and knowledge of existing workers and enable employers to become more productive and competitive * Increase the levels of investment in education and training in the labour market * Provide opportunities for new entrants to the labour market to gain work experience * Improve the employment prospects of persons previously disadvantaged by unfair discrimination and to redress those disadvantages through education and training * Provide and regulate employment services The Act created a number of bodies to regulate and administer training and education, the most important being the National Skills Authority (NSA) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs). The National Skills Authority (NSA) advises the Minister of Higher Education and Training on a national skills development policy and strategy. The NSA's key functions are: * To advise the Minister of Higher Education and Training and to liaise with SETAs with regard to a National Skills Development Policy and Strategy * To report to the Minister of Higher Education and Training on progress made in the implementation of the National Skills Development Strategy * To conduct investigations on any matter arising out of the application of the Act. 5

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    6 Functions of a SETA Functions of a Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) The Skills Development Act establishes SETAs and requires all SETAs to apply to the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) for accreditation as an Education and Training Quality Assurance Body (ETQA). The SAQA Act establishes the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) and creates ETQAs. It is the ETQA which accredits companies and providers to educate and train, register assessors and provide external moderation. SETAs function as advisory bodies on education and training. The economy has been divided into 22 functional sectors, each of which is served by a SETA. SETAs are financed from skills development levies, interest and penalties collected from employers. Ten percent of levies is utilised to administrate the SETA. In the Health and Social Development Sectors, the public organisations also contribute only ten% of their education and 1 training budget (one% of their total annual payroll) to the HWSETA. SETAs are governed by stakeholders in the sector with equal representation of both organised employers and labour. The specific funtions of a SETA are: * To develop a Sector Skills Plan (SSP) within the framework of the National Skills Development Strategy * To implement the SSP by establishing learnerships, skills programmes and approving Workplace Skills Plans (WSPs) and Implementation Reports * To allocate grants to companies * To monitor education and training in the sector * To identify workplaces for practical work experience * To support and facilitate the implementation of the NSDS Function of an ETQA * To accredit providers against registered qualifications and unit standards on the NQF * To ensure quality of learning programmes * To promote quality amongst training providers * To evaluate assessment * To conduct quality system audits * To register assessors * To register moderators

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