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What's Up Muskoka January 8 2014
Newspapers | Community 2014-01-08 11:57:50
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    AD{MM51603} QUILT TRIP The Ryde Quilt Trail adds colour and celebrates 135 years of settlement in Ryde. Page 21 FREE whatsupmuskoka.com January 8, 2014 Personal debt crisis looming Canadians debt-to-income ratio is reaching alarming heights. The time is now to set up a solid budget and stop taking on bad credit. Page 2 SISTERS SHOW Huntsville Community Theatre Company has an emotion filled play. Full Story – Page 21 Medal magic Page 17 Convicted killer heads for Huntsville A woman whose daughter was badly beaten by a convicted killer is informing Muskoka residents that he’s planning a move to the Huntsville area. Page 4 Photograph: Heather Douglas ARROWHEAD FROZEN FUN ICE TRAIL DRAWS BIG CROWDS Page 17 muskokawindowanddoor.ca We Treat Your Home As If It’s Our Own. Install new windows and doors and save immediately. Visit our newly expanded showroom 15 Robert Dollar Drive, Bracebridge

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    AD{MM51537} 2 January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com By Chris Occhiuzzi Getting into financial debt from overspending during the holidays, poor budgeting, or just unforeseeable life happenings can be daunting and quite scary. And the District of Muskoka community services says they process about 400 applications per year from people seeking emergency assistance as a consequence of debt problems. Muskokans are not alone. More and more, Canadians are piling on debt in the forms of credit cards or loans and the debt-to-income ratio for consumers in the nation has hit historic highs. According to BDO Dunwoody, many people are getting themselves into debt they may not be able to climb out of, as our national debt-to-income ratio reached 163.4 per cent in 2013. While monthly payments on this debt have been made possible due to the Bank of Canada keeping interest rates low to stimulate the economy, those rates will begin to rise in the future. Combined with the expected decline of house prices, many will be in a tough financial situation. According to BDO, homes represent the primary asset offsetting debt loads for most Canadians. Doug Jones is a trustee in charge of the financial recovery services practice for BDO’s Lakeland Region, which includes Muskoka. He has over 23 years of insolvency and restructuring experience. He is concerned about the debt load taken on and carried by Canadians, and especially gift-giving over the holidays funded by credit cards. He believes a “happy new year” can easily be tainted by a “holiday debt hangover” and the confluence of interest rate/housing price and economic Photograph: Matt Driscoll Overspending in Muskoka Credit card debt can develop quickly. Experts recommend using cash instead of credit cards to fund holiday purchases. Everyone should have a solid budget in place and be aware of how every penny is spent. issues means this year’s “debt hangover” holds particular concern. “As the holiday bills arrive, people need to consider the longer term perspective and the specifics of their individual circumstances,” says Jones. “Current debt loads will be cause for a debt crisis for many when interest rates start to rise in the near future and the monthly bill payments soar.” Jones says there’s a seasonality to insolvency as the highest number of bankruptcies and filing proposals occur annually in February, March and April, which is the product of the January bills arriving to those who can’t afford to pay them. Jones says often those buying throughout the year on credit, then paying it off in monthly installments, don’t realize how much more they’re paying for the item than its actual costs. When buying gifts with a credit card, individuals are usually paying 18 per cent on the original cost. “If you look at credit cards, we’re carrying $85 billion in debt in Canada,” says Jones. “That’s crazy.” People need to understand when purchasing, they should be working within a budget and only using cash or a debit card for payment. Jones says credit card statements now have a line explaining how long it will take to pay off the debt at one’s current rate of repayment. He saw one credit card statement in which the person would not have it paid off until they were 105. Jones is concerned about the senior population carrying debt into retirement. One of the fastest growing statistics is 65- plus aged individuals declaring bankruptcies or filing consumer proposals. Do YOU suffer from CHRONIC NECK OR BACK PAIN? Spinal decompression therapy may be the answer. Spinal decompression therapy is a non-surgical, non-invasive method of alleviating the pressures on the spine, resulting in improved function and a decrease in pain and discomfort. Many of our clients have experienced dramatic improvements in health. “I suffered with constant low back pain for more than 20 years. My left leg often felt like pins and needles. At one point, my legs became paralyzed for a few weeks. I received spinal decompression therapy over 3 months and was amazed at how well it worked.” Bill N. “More than 30 years ago, I injured my back. Over the years, the intermittent pain turned to constant agony. With spinal decompression therapy, I almost immediately started to notice small changes. Soon the pain and cramping in my legs all but disappeared. Then came the miracle – a whole day with no pain!” Katrina A. Think of how your pain, stiffness, headaches and lack of quality sleep are impacting your health. Spinal decompression may be what you’ve looking for. Call or visit our clinic today to learn more, and try spinal decompression for yourself. ALGONQUIN CHIROPRACTIC DR. DOUG NEUDORF 17 West Street, North, Huntsville, ON 705-787-1001 SPECIAL OFFER L I M I T E D T I M E This certificate entitles the bearer to a consultation, complete spinal examination including x-rays, if necessary, and 1 Spinal Decompression Treatment. Redeemable only at Algonquin Chiropractic, 17 West Street North, Huntsville, ON $ 35 WITH THIS COUPON FOR Regularly $180

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    AD{MM51410} AD{MM51649} A consumer proposal is a way to settle one’s debt while working with a trustee and the creditors. Generally the settlement is for less than the full amount owing and all creditors must agree. “There was a recent survey saying 59 per cent of people entering retirement are carrying debt into retirement,” says Jones. “What happens is they’re on a lower fixed monthly income. So when they’re carrying that debt, they can’t afford it.” Rick Williams, District of Muskoka director of community services, says they receive about 400 applications each year from people seeking emergency assistance as a consequence of debt problems. He says they co-ordinate their efforts with charitable organizations such as the Salvation Army to get individuals and families the immediate assistance they require to get them through the “right now” emergency. “Oftentimes, the presenting problem is not debt in that case, it’s eviction, the inability to provide food or heat,” says Williams. “It tends to be something more pressing. But more and more we’re seeing that debt is part of the puzzle. Either credit card debt or they’ve locked into difficult arrangements or contracts.” But Williams also says they’ll help work with the people in financial trouble towards a brighter future rather than just give some immediate help. “It’s really a puzzle because there are often times we can provide short-term assistance but those underlying conditions resurface pretty quickly,” he says. “We definitely work with some of the financial institutions and credit counselling because we want to help people address those underlying concerns.” Williams says often they are seeing debt circumstances as part of the component for people seeking other forms of support such as Ontario Works or housing subsidies. People without a bank account have extra challenges because when cashing either pay cheques or government assistance cheques, they are being charged a fee, says Williams. “They don’t have an operating vehicle so they end up having to do all their shopping, instead of some of their shopping, at “If you look at credit cards, we’re carrying $85 billion in debt in Canada. That’s crazy.” convenience stores,” he says. “All of which leaves a person with limited amount of resources. They’re paying three per cent on cheque cashing, another five per cent or more on convenience shopping. So what they have suddenly becomes tighter and that’s a difficulty. For a single mom with two kids, Ontario Works gives around $1,100 or $1,200. It’s reduced by just simply servicing the fact they don’t have a standard account.” Even people with solid budgets and financial plans can find themselves in financial difficulty. A self-employed person who gets injured on the job or a dual-income family dealing with separation can quickly have financial issues. He suggests seeing a licensed trustee in these situations to get solid financial advice. Bankruptcy is one of many ways to deal with the situation. Should one file bankruptcy or make debt proposals, only a licensed trustee can file on behalf of an individual according to Canadian law. Jones warns of debt consultants, who are not licensed trustees.“If you run into financial difficulty, one of the best things you can do is see a trustee because they’re going to explain every option to you,” says Jones. Tracking every penny spent for three months is Jones suggestion. “Because once you know where every penny goes, you can start changing your spending patterns.” Jones says to attack the highest rate interest items first when paying down debt. Look at the interest rates at each item and any surplus funds goes to paying that down first, then continue from there. He’s adamant that everyone, not just those struggling with debt, to have a budget in place. Jones says one’s budget can’t just be about rent, groceries and utilities. It should go beyond that and include retirement savings, Christmas spending and birthdays. One should be thinking long-term and have a contingency fund and budget accordingly. “My joke is they happen the same time every year people, don’t be surprised when they occur,” says Jones of annual gift-giving events. “You should be planning ahead, so do a budget.” SANDER MOTOR SALES LTD. NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED $11,495 $17,995 $14,995 $14,995 Stock #013-26 2011 Nissan Versa 1.8S Former Daily Rental, 69,351 kms. Stock #9H527745 2009 Chrysler 300 300C 59,671 kms. 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    AD{MM51601} 4 January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com A Message About Fluoride and Your Oral Health On November 18, the District of Muskoka Council voted to remove fluoride from Muskoka’s municipal drinking water as of February 3, 2014. Area municipalities can continue to keep water fluoridation for their respective communities if they choose. They must inform the District of Muskoka Council prior to January 15, 2014 to make their wishes known. If you want to keep the benefits of fluoride in your community’s water, speak out. Talk to your local council members and make your views known. The Case for Water Fluoridation Muskoka’s children have had fewer cavities than children living in communities in Simcoe County without community water fluoridation. The Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit promotes the use of community water fluoridation as a safe and cost-effective way of reducing tooth decay. It reaches all members of our communities, regardless of age, education or income. It is a public health practice that is promoted worldwide by numerous organizations including: For more information on the benefits of fluoridation, contact us. Convicted killer headed for Huntsville Photograph: Scott Wishart\QMI Agency Justin Primmer is escorted by police from a Stratford courthouse after his conviction for manslaughter in 2004. By Matt Driscoll A Stratford area man convicted of manslaughter in 2003 and the violent beating of a 22-year-old woman in 2013 is headed for a new home in Huntsville, according to the mother of one of his victims. Justin Primmer was just 19 years old in 2003 when he was convicted in the stabbing death of Bill “Bonesy” Welch in Stratford. On probation for assault at the time of the stabbing, Primmer was handed a sentence of 10 years behind bars, but two-for-one credit for time served knocked two years off of that and early release took another three. In the end, he served only half the sentence. Upon his release from prison he fought in several professional mixed martial arts fights under the nickname “the Ninja.” In May 2013, Primmer was convicted in the brutal beating of 22-year-old Desiree Gallagher. Gallagher nearly died after plunging seven storeys from the balcony of Primmer’s London apartment. She has 14 screws holding her spine together, as well as plates and screws in her left arm and ankle. A portion of her skull was removed to relieve swelling of her brain, she’s partially blind and has lost her shortterm memory. “She’s still in the hospital,” says Gallagher’s mother Susan Gerth. “She still has to get a piece of her skull put back in. She’s 22 years old and her life has been changed dramatically, and so has her family’s. It’s been horrible.” Primmer had only met Gallagher, a Mohawk College student, earlier the same day as the assault but she remembers nothing about the incident. Primmer was charged with assault causing bodily harm after police seized a cellphone containing photographs of Gallagher’s badly beaten face from his apartment. Primmer pleaded guilty to assault causing bodily harm in the beating and was sentenced to six months in jail, a decision that outraged Gallagher’s friends and family. “It’s really not fair, she’s in the hospital and he’s out living his life,” says Gerth. “The part that gets me is that he’s already a convicted killer. If he had of done his 10-year sentence, my daughter would never have run into him.” Gerth says she was contacted last week by Primmer’s probation officer and told that Primmer, who was released in October, is moving to the Huntsville area. A spokesperson for Correctional Service Canada would not confirm that Primmer is moving to Huntsville, but would say that information can be given to the victim’s family in some instances. Gerth says she remains concerned for the safety of her daughter but also for the safety of those living in Primmer’s new home community. “He’s coming to an area where nobody knows him and I feel I need to get the information out there,” says Gerth. With files from QMI Agency. Couple cashes in on glitch By Matt Driscoll A Bracebridge couple received a late Christmas present, but a welcome one nonetheless. Due to a major computer glitch, Delta Airlines offered abnormally low fares for flights in the United States for a brief period of time and Tamsen Tillson and Russ Harper happened to be booking a flight at just the right time. “It’s just dumb luck. It’s not like I buy a lot of plane tickets,” says Tillson. “It’s kind of like winning the lottery in a small way.” Tillson and Harper were planning to catch a flight to Houston, where they plan to embark on a cruise later this month. “I was going to book from Toronto to Houston but the fares were like $600. Then I started looking at Buffalo and the fares were about $320 each,” she says. “When I actually went to book it, and you put in the credit card and they total it up, the total came to $111 for both us – with taxes and everything.” Delta had fixed the problem within a few hours, but announced they would honour the tickets bought at lower fares. The company did not specify the cause of the glitch. “I thought there must be some special I didn’t know about, I better hit confirm as quickly as I can,” says Tillson. “I’m used to it going the other way around, you think it’s going to be one price and then, oh it’s going to be 20 per cent more because we didn’t account for taxes.” Airfarewatchdogs.com, a travel and fare lookout website, says fares went as low as $40 for a round trip between New York and Los Angeles, and $200 for a first-class round trip ticket between Los Angeles and Hawaii. Economy rates for round trip travel between New York and Los Angeles on Delta typically cost around $400 or more. A first-class round trip ticket from Los Angeles to Hawaii for the second week of January costs more than Photograph: Matt Driscoll Tamsen Tillson and Russ Harper recently booked airline tickets and capitalized on a computer malfunction. $3,500 on the Delta website. “Airlines employ analysts whose job is to constantly monitor competition and keep tweaking rates. It is possible that one of them entered a wrong number,” says George Hobica, founder of airfarewatchdogs.com. Hobica said most of the software airlines use for adjusting rates do not have safety catches that cross check on a value entered, which makes it easier to make mistakes, especially during busy travel seasons. In September, United Airlines had a similar problem, with its website selling tickets for as low as $5. In total, Harper and Tillson saved roughly $500. “It was awesome. What a great Christmas gift,” says Tillson. With files from QMI agency.

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    AD{MM51580} 5 $ 200,000,000 2 Inventory clearance save on Leon’s Overstocks • manufacturers’ Closeouts • Special Purchases & more! January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com POWER RECLINING SOFA! Put your feet up and relax in true comfort with the soft, tranquil feel of this sofa. If sold separately: Reclining Sofa $999 Reclining Loveseat $979 Reclining Chair $699 Area Rug (8’ x 11’) $329 059-02880 / 397-25222 / 937-10088 PLUS! WALL UNIT WITH NEW LIFE-LIKE FLAME TECHNOLOGY $ 1399 COCKTAIL TABLE $ 179 AMAZING BUY! $ 699 DON’T PAY FOR 18 MONTHS! • O.A.C. Taxes, processing fee and other applicable fees due at the time of purchase. SOFA When you purchase the matching loveseat and chair Power Recliner! SUPER BUY! $ 399 CLEARANCE PRICE Recline to any position with a push of a button! Features leather look with decorative stitching. 708-19350 WHAT A DEAL! $ 499 CLEARANCE PRICE WHAT A DEAL! $ 399 CLEARANCE PRICE Super Capacity Top Load Laundry 4.2 Cu. Ft. (IEC) super capacity washer with 10 wash cycles • 7.0 Cu. Ft. capacity dryer with GentleBreeze™ drying system 202-52300 / 202-51300 YOUR BEST CHOICE FOR HOME FURNISHINGS IN MUSKOKA www.facebook.com/ LeonsMuskoka MONDAY - THURSDAY MONDAY - THURSDAY 9:30 A.M. - 6 P.M. 9:30 A.M. - 6 P.M. FRIDAY FRIDAY 9:30 A.M. - 7 P.M. 9:30 A.M. - 7 P.M. SATURDAY: 9:30 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. SATURDAY: 9:30 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. SUNDAY: 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. SUNDAY: 10 A.M. - 5 P.M. *O.A.C. All applicable taxes, electronics disposal or recycling fees where applicable and a processing fee of $89.95 (Eg. $1500 purchase with $89.95 PF equals an APR of 4.0%) are due at the time of purchase. Balance is due 18 months from the date of purchase. All items available while quantities last. Prices, terms and conditions may vary according to region. Selection may vary from store to store. Not applicable to previous purchases and markdown items. All first time buyers in Ontario must put down a 15% deposit on any financed pick-up purchase over $1,000. Electronics disposal or recycling fees may apply. See store for details.

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    AD{MM51448} AD{MM51468} 6 January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Learning and helping in Kenyan school Megan Davies, of Bracebridge, spent three months in Africa, volunteering in a school in Naibi, Kenya. Her many tasks included caring for children, marking papers and helping prepare Kenyan food for lunch. She said the people were very kind. By Kim Hawn Spending three months in a desperately poor and densely populated slum, even by third world standards, is not a venture that would appeal to most of us. But a young woman from Bracebridge has done just that, in her desire to help some of the world’s poorest children. Megan Davies, 27, travelled to Nairobi, Kenya, in September, and returned home Dec. 16, under the auspices of African Inland Mission, and with the support of her Bracebridge church, Harvest Bible Chapel. In the Nairobi neighbourhood of Kiberia, reportedly the largest urban slum in Africa, Davies stayed with a Kenyan couple who recently founded a local Christian school there, called Ghetto Light Educational Centre. Davies’ home, in which she and another Photograph: Courtesy of Megan Davies young woman stayed, did have running water and a bathroom, a step up from the typical one-room Kiberian hut which has neither. Despite the mammoth social problems inherent in such widespread deprivation, she says the local people were very kind. “We were the two white girls in the slums,” she says. “Word got around; they looked out for us.” The locals would gaze at the missionaries’ soft hair and fair skin, curiously touching their hair, especially that of her blonde companion. Her work in the fledgling school of about 60 students, currently aged two to six, included helping the teachers with the school work. This included grading, and preparing lesson papers one by one. “They don’t have photocopiers like we do here!” she says. She helped with the lunches. “I would help the Kenyans cook. I learned a lot in the (makeshift) kitchen. They taught me how to make Kenyan food.” It took a lot of time to cook and serve the kids, she says. “Many days there were not enough plates either . . . hungry kids would have to wait until others were done.” She would play outside with them at recess. “The kids would touch my hair for sometimes the whole recess!” The younger ones loved to sit on her lap, blow bubbles, and nap. The school’s mission includes teaching and caring for children, but its ultimate aim is to provide them with the means to help their fellow Kenyans obtain the skills needed for personal growth, and to learn to follow the guidance of God. Davies says that Kenyans very much want to be able to help their countrymen and to rely less on international aid. Davies arrived in Kenya on the very day that the upscale West Gate Mall in Nairobi was bombed by Islamists, killing or wounding over two hundred people. “We were told there had been an incident in the west part of the city.” But this is an area dominated by European peoples with BMWs and SUVs; it was not the part of Nairobi in which she was interested. The chief inspiration Davies derived from the experience is observing the childlike faith of fellow believers as they live in such tremendous poverty. “Their hope is in the Lord,” she says. “They trust Him hour by hour for everything they need.” Clarification The Township of Lake of Bays does not have a bylaw which mandates that those operating bubblers must have a warning light. They do have a lighting bylaw that stipulates if such lights are used, they cannot be strobe lights or red lights. Warren J. Gemmell, DDS | Aesthetics and Comprehensive Dentistry Taking care of all your dental needs, conservatively to fit your budget. BUY 1 GET 1 ½ PRICE BUY 2 GET 1 FREE (bring your family or friends) FREE FRAME SELECTION WITH LENS PURCHASE New Patients & Emergencies Welcome! Evening Appointments Available 36 Chaffey St., Huntsville www.dentistryinhuntsville.com (705) 789-1747 Your prescription is your property Choose to Shop with us! 295 Wellington Street, Unit 3, Bracebridge 705-645-8861 DOLCE AND GABBANA

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    AD{MM51577} AD{MM51501} Corridor 11 bus adds stops Greg Hammond of Hammond Transportation marks last year’s Highway 11 bus launch. Hammond Transportation is celebrating one full year of Corridor 11 Bus service with the addition of more stops. Despite unexpected setbacks in late 2012, which temporarily halted service, the Corridor 11 Bus hit the road permanently last December and has been going strong ever since. “We are really pleased with how ridership has continued to increase over the year,” says Scott Hammond, director of operations for Hammond Transportation. Starting Jan. 6, a slightly new schedule was introduced with three new stops in Bracebridge, including one at the Dollarama Plaza, one at the Georgian College Campus, and one at The Nest Family Resource Centre at 10 Armstrong Street. The bus will continue to run Monday to Friday, from Huntsville to Barrie and back, making stops along the way in Bracebridge, Gravenhurst, Washago and Orillia. It does not run on weekends or holidays. Photograph: Corey Wilkinson 7 January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com ThankYou for 46Years! 46TH Anniversary SALE Huge discounts on all in stock items from January 13 to February 22nd UP TO 46% OFF SELECTED MERCHANDISE WE OFFER A LIFETIME INSTALLATION GUARANTEE Package A: 2 payments of only $149 (+HST) 1 Personal Training Session/week Package B: 2 payments of only $249 (+HST) 2 Personal Training Session/week Store Hours: Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. & Saturday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. TAYLOR CARPET ONE 30 Cairns Crescent, Huntsville 705-789-9259 www.taylorcarpetonehuntsville.com

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    8 January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com WHAT’S UP MUSKOKA EDITORIAL New year, new direction As 2014 dawns, many Muskokans, and Canadians in general, find themselves facing a bleak year financially. The debt-to-income ratio continues to spiral out of control, and many become stuck in the vortex. As the experts point out, the holiday season is a particularly trying time, as bills for presents bought on credit come due. While the potential to pay off credit with credit can look like the easy out, it’s ultimately a losing proposition. The solution is not an easy one, but a new calendar year could mark a new opportunity at financial stability. By keeping track of where every dollar goes, a family can get a sense of where they might have a little room to manoeuvre and possibly cut back. Buying only what you can afford might sound like a simple mantra, but it’s easier said than done when banks and companies are all too eager to offer big credit limits. However, just because you can buy something, doesn’t necessarily mean you should. People need to look at money in a new way. Thankfully, those who need a bit of help or some expert financial advice can find it right here in Muskoka. It’s not always the easiest road to walk, but being moneywise in 2014 could lead to lifelong benefits. Remove flouride Dear Editor: I have been a dentist for 34 years. Within our organizations we are compelled to follow the party lines/ status quo thinking and beliefs. I had my blinders removed in about 1993 and since that time have tried to practise following the true Hippocratic Oath – that being essentially “First do no harm”– as opposed to the hypocritical oath of “Just do as we tell you.” Many dental materials consist of toxic substances and chemicals which should never be used in a person’s mouth and that list is long. However, the water fluoridation issue goes even deeper in that it is forced ingestion of a toxic substance. There are studies which show negligible dental benefits and even negative effects from fluoridation. Without getting into specifics of studies and toxicity, I will simply say fluoride has only been proven effective when applied topically to erupted teeth, but when ingested can have very deleterious effects throughout the body. Keeping fluoride out of municipal water supplies is fair to all, allowing those who choose to use it to do so individually. We must all work to reduce the toxins in our lives and environments – and this is one small and simple step. For more information check out : www.iaomt.org and www.fluoridealert.org Richard Smyth Huntsville Venturing onto lake ice involves personal risk Dear Editor: What is astonishing in the recent coverage of Muskoka’s “bubbler problem” is the lack of any expectation for personal responsibility that individuals must take in safeguarding themselves from various perils. Yes, those of us with lakefront infrastructure costing six figures who seek to protect our investment from the elements must do so with caution: it is indeed our responsibility to provide proper warning of the open water created by bubblers and to minimize the size of that opening where practical. But surely there is an onus on those who seek to venture onto the ice – a potentially risky undertaking at the best of times – that they must do so with caution. Is there no need for those who fish or use ATVs and snowmobiles to accept that travelling along the shoreline where bubblers are at work is inviting uncertainty? Is there no requirement that they should also accept there’s a whole big lake out there for their enjoyment, not the shoreline? Why would anyone in their right mind, knowing bubblers are churning, endanger themselves by ignoring this well-known fact? Perhaps the police, who seem so keen to levy manslaughter charges (surely an amazing overreaction by zealots), ought to put their effort towards stressing the uncertainty of travelling on the ice in winter. That way, those who choose to disregard such warnings can take personal responsibility for their single-mined resolve and not just blame “the other guy.” Peter Jennings Port Carling Do you have something you want to say? Send us your letters to the Editor. Email to: mm.editor@sunmedia.ca Mail to: Box 180, Bracebridge, ON P1L 1T6 Curtis Armstrong ext. 203 Publisher – Print & Digital Sandy Lockhart ext. 205 Editor – Print & Digital Matt Driscoll ext. 210 Assistant Editor Chris Occhiuzzi ext. 218 Multimedia Journalist Donna Ansley ext. 209 Shannon Donnelly ext. 216 Martha Gillan ext. 204 Laurie Johle ext. 214 Aussa Penniall ext.211 Multimedia Sales Marc Bonitatibus Production Manager Matthew Walker Senior Graphic Designer Angy Gliddon ext. 213 Ken Northey ext. 201 Reader Sales and Service What’s Up Muskoka is published by Cottage Country Communications, a division of: Copyright© 2014, Sun Media Corp. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material published in What’s Up Muskoka is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. Printed in Canada. Published weekly. Subscription Rates: Within Canada, outside of Muskoka One year $55.00 plus applicable taxes. Two years $95.00 plus applicable taxes. Canada Post Publication Sales Product Agreement Number 40025080 Address changes should be sent to the address below. How to contact us: Mail: P.O. Box 180, Bracebridge, ON P1L 1T6 Street Address: 12 – 440 Ecclestone Drive, Bracebridge Phone: (705) 646-1314 Fax: (705) 645-6424 E-mail: mm.info@sunmedia.ca Website: www.whatsupmuskoka.com FOLLOW US ON

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    AD{MM51543} AD{MM44221} AD{MM51594} AD{MM51614} New Year is time for positive life changes OP ED WHAT’S UP MUSKOKA By Aira Darzins-Chapman Greetings from beautiful, wintery Muskoka! I have the magical question for you, as 2014 arrives: what do you deeply desire in your life? These desires may be in your work life, school, career, and/or relationships with family, partners or in parenting skills that you may want goals to be set for changes to begin in 2014? If you are wondering how to answer this question, a life coach may be able to assist you. What is a life coach you ask? A life coach is a trained professional, using the most practical and cutting edge techniques and tools from neuroscience and positive psychology in order to provide you with the most effective and successful coaching experience. A coach works directly with you, in order to produce the desired change necessary to create a happier, more purposeful and passionate life. A coach can assist you as you travel through your life’s challenges with improved clarity on your visions for success through establishing goals that work for you. They help you to identify hidden obstacles and break through on present limitations, along with uncovering patterns that can assist you to become more productive in your life. How does a life coach help? A life coach can help by meeting with you on one-to-one basis, most often by telephone, and begin the process that aims to draw out your individual potential. A life coach is trained to assist you by listening, asking reflective questions and facilitation towards change in a reactive, flexible manner that allows for personal growth on an individual basis. There are no assumptions or judgments in the coaching process, as empathy is key to the route of self-discovery. Life coaching is very adaptable to your directions and desires, so you can discover and decide what are the required next steps through your goals that will work best for you. Life coaching can be used in many aspects of your life, and at any time, so it “There are no assumptions or judgements in the coaching process, as empathy is key to the route of self-discovery.” is important to identify what you would like to overcome. This could include work; home, financial, relationships or personal growth or combinations of needs that you may need assistance to sort out. How best to choose a life coach? Life coaching is a rapidly growing field. When choosing a life coach there are three important considerations to look for: 1. Certification/ training – The International Coach Federation (ICF) is the organization that sets and monitors the international standard for professional coaching ethics, training practices. 2. References – word of mouth is a strong referral source for life coaches as more often one-toone work is done via telephone over a set time. The most common contracts range from four to six months with weekly sessions. 3. Personal comfort – personal comfort with your coach is most important Photograph: Courtesy of Aira Darzins-Chapman Aira Darzins-Chapman says there are many ways a life coach can help individuals realize their potential in 2014. in order to develop the deep trust necessary for perspectives to be shared and changes to develop. If you feel you would like to explore those deep desires further in 2014, a life coach may be what you need to set them in motion. Aira Darzins-Chapman, ECEDH.C, BASoc. MEd, is a member of the International Coaching Federation (ICF) and owner Ardcoaching.com providing services in Muskoka and surrounding areas for the past eight years. 9 January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com TheDispensaryPharmacy 232 Manitoba Street, Bracebridge • Tel: 705-646-7646. Fax: 705-646-7648. Email: dispensaryrx@gmail.com . Free Pick Up and Delivery . All Drug Plans Honoured . We waive$2.00 RX Co-payment . We do Compound Prescriptions . 24 Hour Telephone Service We need your help! Red Cross is in need of Transportation Volunteers in the Muskoka Area! If you are interested in helping seniors in your community, please call 1-800-387-2251 ext 5266 Speak to Tara Bone tara.bone@redcross.ca We reimburse our volunteers $0.34 per km Servicing Bracebridge &Surrounding Area SALES & SERVICE • Spas • Hot Tubs • Water Care Products • Pool Supplies • Pool Tables • Games Room Acc. 440 Ecclestone Drive, Bracebridge, ON P1L 1Z6 705-645-8613 www.hottubwarehouse.ca Your PartnersinPainRelief Providing Gentle and E ective Relief for: • Low Back Pain • Sciatic Leg Pain • Neck Pain • Headaches • Workplace Injuries • Motor Vehicle Accident Injuries • Same Day Emergency Care Contact Dr. Michael Mekis and Dr. Kelly McIntosh 705-687-2012 gravenhurstchiropractic.com

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    AD{MM51559} AD{MM51648} 10 January 8, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Bubbler issue needs to stand alone Dear Editor: The following letter was sent to Muskoka Lakes Township and to What’s Up Muskoka for publication. At the recent meeting of the Township of Muskoka Lakes Planning Committee of the Whole, a draft bylaw to Assess and Control the Effects of Water and Ice Disturbing Equipment on the waters of the Township of Muskoka Lakes was introduced. This draft bylaw appears to have been expanded to combine two separate and unrelated matters – ice away systems Dear Editor: I would like to comment on a recent letter published in What’s up Muskoka. Dr. Brian Denyar, a retired pediatric dentist stated he felt obligated to join the latest discussion of water fluoridation in Muskoka, resulting in his vouch to continue fluoridation and even challenging fluoride opponents to prove evidence of ill effects caused by the drug. Both the American Dental Association, The Centers for Disease Control and Canada’s leading fluoride authority, Dr. Hardy Limeback all recommend that infants not receive fluoridated water for drinking, nor for formula. I feel confident suggesting this agreed upon stance is based on reason rather than foolishness. Caregivers, including Dr. Denyar, should pursue understanding such precaution.. Dr. Denyar stated: “At ideal levels of fluoride use, there are no documented adverse cosmetic or other systemic ill effects on the human body.” I believe this statement is false and is beyond the scope of Dr. (bubblers) and water flow disturbances. On Nov. 19, 2013 the MRA delegated and presented to council on the subject of bubbler system use (and misuse) – period. This same presentation was made to District of Muskoka on Dec. 16 and to the Town of Gravenhurst on Dec. 17, 2013. To say that the MRA, in Coun. Burgess’s words “challenged the township” to write this bylaw, is simply not the case. The Ratepayers are supportive of many of the initiatives set out in the bylaw that relate to bubbler systems. These initiatives provide a platform for study. Denyar’s profession because as recognized by the California Board of Dental Examiners: “effects of ingested fluoride are not within the purview of dentistry.” Dr. Kennedy, past president of International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology states, “All of the organizations promoting water fluoridation agree that However, much additional work and investigation, using experts in the field, needs to be carried out. Further, we would like to know who authorized the retention of legal assistance in the drafting of this bylaw. We support the suggestion made by Coun. Nishikawa that a committee be struck to examine the bubbler issue and the MRA would be pleased to be a part of this committee. To be perfectly clear, our interest lies ONLY with the portion of the bylaw that relates to bubblers and ice-away systems. dental fluorosis, which is the first visible sign of systemic poisoning, increases with water fluoride levels.” Dental fluorosis is surely cosmetic – at the very least. Based on dental fluorosis, fluoride’s safety margin is less than one. Most therapeutic substances have a margin of safety of at least 10 which means people The other matters that the township has incorporated in the bylaw appear to relate to “structures and facilities” that affect “water flow velocities.” This is a completely unrelated and separate issue that might be construed as yet another attempt to block the small hydro plant at the Bala falls. We request that these two issues be treated as two separate items for further discussion and action. Liz Denyar President, Muskoka Ratepayers’ Association Flouride and fluorosis should concern us all Dear Editor: I don’t care how well the OPP do their job, they are going to bankrupt us all. It’s time for some drastic action ie. major cutbacks. What have the OPP become over the years? A police force that used to concentrate on criminals is now a force mostly involved with babysitting the citizens of Ontario. We could cut the size of the OPP in half by eliminating their babysitting duties. Here are my cutbacks. No more checking for seatbelts. No more checking for cell phones. No more checking for helmets on bikers, snowmobilers and ATV drivers. Eliminate speed traps. Eliminate marine patrols on non international waters. And yes, even eliminate roadside checks for drunk drivers. All these babysitting duties can be replaced by erecting signs on our roadways: Drive at your own risk. Let’s get this force back to what they can consume 10 times a “recommended dose” without suffering ill effects. Frighteningly, fluoride’s health effects are seen at levels well below the normal “no effect” safety margin of ten. Surely it should concern us all. Kyle O’Connor Huntsville Eliminate babysitting by OPP to save money were designed to do. Catching thieves and murderers. Ontario is suffering enough already with our manufacturing industry in a shambles and the resulting job losses across the province. We can’t afford the OPP in its current state. If these proposed OPP increases take effect, we’ll all be forced to leave Ontario and move to Alberta. Glenn Clarke Gravenhurst PUBLIC NOTICE Applicant: CLARK, ARIS, BARKER & MAYE Part of Lot 2, Concession 13, Trading Bay Part of Lot 2, Concession 13, Trading Bay Part Lot 2, Concession 12, Trading Bay Geographic Township of Sherborne WHEREAS the Council of the Corporation of the Township of Algonquin Highlands has declared parts of the original shore road allowance lying in front of Part of Lot 2, Concession 13, Part of Lot 2, Concession 12, and Part Lot 2, Concession 13 and all of the original shore road allowance in front of the original road allowance between concessions 12 and 13 adjacent to lot 2, Trading Bay, in the geographic Township of Sherborne, in the Township of Algonquin Highlands, County of Haliburton, to be surplus. TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Municipal Corporation of the Township of Algonquin Highlands proposes to enact a By-Law to stop-up, close and convey to the abutting property owner(s) that part of the original shore road allowance lying in front of Part of Lot 2, Concession 13, Part of Lot 2, Concession 12, and Part of Lot 2, Concession 13 and all of the original shore road allowance in front of the original road allowance between concessions 12 and 13 adjacent to Lot 2, Trading Bay, described as all and singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the Geographic Township of Sherborne in the County of Haliburton and being composed of the following: FIRSTLY: THAT part of the original shore road allowance in front of Lot 2, Concession 13 and all of the original shore road allowance in front of the original road allowance between concessions 12 and 13 adjacent to Lot 2 described as Part 2 on a Plan deposited in the Registry Office for the Registry Division of Haliburton County as Plan 19R-9546. ONE STOP MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL SERVICES 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE SERVING MUSKOKA SINCE 1945 210 Brock St., Gravenhurst Muskoka, ON Tel: (705) 687-3402 ext.6 www.gravenhurstplumbing.com info@gravenhurstplumbing.com SECONDLY: THAT part of the original shore road allowance in front of Lot 2, Concession 13 described as Part 3 on a Plan deposited in the Registry Office for the Registry Division of Haliburton County as Plan 19R-9546. THIRDLY: THAT part of the original shore road allowance in front of Lot 2, Concession 12 described as Parts 5 on a Plan deposited in the Registry Office for the Registry Division of Haliburton County as Plan 19R-9546. The proposed By-Law will come before the said Council for consideration at it’s regular meeting at the Algonquin Highlands Municipal Office, 1123 North Shore Road, on the 16th day of January, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 a.m., and at that time, the Council will hear in person or by his/her counsel, solicitor or agent any person who claims that his/her land will be prejudicially affected and who applies to be heard. Dated: January 8, 2014 Dawn Newhook Clerk-Planning Administrator Township of Algonquin Highlands 1123 North Shore Rd. Algonquin Highlands, ON K0M 1J1 Tel: (705) 489-2379 Email: dnewhook@algonquinhighlands.ca YOU’VE JUST PROVED Advertising Works Call 705-646-1314 or visit www.whatsupmuskoka.com to learn how we can help your business

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