Topics
Publishers
Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
What's Up Muskoka April 3, 2013
Magazines / Newspapers | News 2013-04-02 11:08:37
Page 1 of 4
  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 1

    Muskoka's high schools rated According to the Fraser Report, Bracebridge, Gravenhurst and Huntsville public high schools are in the top third but St. Dominic is in the bottom third. Page 2 Artists return Page 27 Residents left wondering about water Canadian National Railway says they sent results of soil samples and water table impact to the Township of Muskoka Lakes in October. It seems the residents were never informed. Page 3 MUSKOKA Photograph: Scott Serfas/ Red Bull Content Pool RIO ON ICE IN HUNTSVILLE Huntsville Skating Club rehearsing for big show FREE MUSKOKA CRASH Page 26 whatsupmuskoka.com April 3, 2013 By COREY WILKINSON or two Muskoka brothers, hurtling F down an obstacle course on ice is part of the thrill. Full Story - Page 24 WAKEBOARD NATIONALS BALA PLAYS HOST IN AUGUST Page 25

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 2

    2 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Photograph: Corey Wilkinson Article by Chris Occhiuzzi Gravenhurst High School and Bracebridge and Muskoka Lakes Secondary School are among the top quarter of all 725 secondary schools in the province. Huntsville High makes the top third and St. Dominic's Catholic Secondary School is just in the bottom third, at 495 out of 725. As an independent Canadian public policy research and educational organization, the Fraser Institute has put together a ranking and rating for 725 public, private, and Catholic secondary schools based on seven academic indicators using data from the annual province wide tests 228 Taylor Road. Unit 3C Bracebridge (705) 645-1144 Improving grades for public schools of literacy and math managed by Ontario's Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO). Bracebridge Muskoka Lakes Secondary School, Huntsville High School and Gravenhurst High School were the only three Trillium Lakelands high schools to go up in ratings and rankings. The other four TLDSB secondary schools, all located outside Muskoka, saw drops in their academic rankings. BMLSS had a rating improvement to 7.5 from 6.6 and is ranked 138. Gravenhurst moved up to a 7.4 rating from 6.6 and is ranked 148, while Huntsville 19 Kinton Avenue Huntsville (705) 789-6869 improved in rating to 6.9 from 6.7 and is ranked 232. Muskoka's only Simcoe Muskoka Catholic District school, St. Dominic in Bracebridge, did poorly according to the Fraser Institute report. St. Dominic scored a 5.4 rating, which was the same as their previous score. However, this score saw them drop three spots in the rankings from 492 to 495. Many in Muskoka are dismissing the Fraser Institute's "report card" on Ontario's secondary schools as a way of determining which schools provide quality educations for their students. Teacher Chris Sellon talks to students at Bracebridge and Muskoka Lakes Secondary School. It is the top rated high school in Muskoka according to the Fraser Report. According to BMLSS principal Dave Golden, these ratings and rankings don't give parents a full and complete picture of what each school has to offer. "This ranking needs to be put into proper perspective," says Golden. "It provides an incomplete and distorted picture of school effectiveness. Ranking undermines valid evaluation and testing measures. Our EQAO scores are one piece of a whole picture about a school. EQAO test results provide useful information to improve our learning programs, but it's unfair and misleading to compare schools based only on these scores."

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 3

    Carol Corriveau-Truchon is the trustee for Ward 4 of the Simcoe Catholic board, which includes St. Dominic. She says they don't believe in the validity of the Fraser report because it uses very limited data to rank schools. Corriveau-Truchon says her board, the Ministry of Education and even the EQAO itself does not support to the use of EQAO data to rank schools or students. "The EQAO results are intended to be used to help schools improve teaching and learning for students," she says. "Our board uses the results for their intended purpose." Louis Clodd is vice chair of the Trillium Lakelands trustee board and has children attending school in Muskoka. She agrees with Golden about the true picture being distorted in the Fraser Institute report card. Clodd says there are many other factors to take into consideration, including programming run by the schools, real life training and the size of each school. "We need to look at our graduation rates in our area," says Clodd of Muskoka. "They are definitely up over the past few years . . . We believe and are strong in our belief that we are providing students in this area what they need to go out into the world. Practical skills, real life skills, real chances to have hands-on learning. We believe it is of the utmost importance that our students have those skills going forward." While each school has the same academic curriculum, Clodd points to special programming offered in schools which are specific to each municipality and district, such as hospitality courses offered in Muskoka's high schools and perhaps a log cutting course which may be available in northern communities. She urges parents researching schools to go into each institution and meet those who would be watching their children. "Every school has its own dynamic," she says. "Going into the school and actually finding out what programs are available at that school. For example at Watt Public School, we have the same curriculum but we have different programming happening specific to that area. And the same with a Lindsay school or a Huntsville or a Haliburton, so they need to find out what happens with that student in that area that's going to progress them later in life. I think it's important for parents to look at the whole picture and not just the academic side because life skills are a huge part of learning." Corriveau-Truchon says St. Dominic being ranked very low by the Fraser Institute shows why the rankings and ratings are not valid and cannot be an effective tool for educators or parents. "If a small school like St. Dominic, which is the smallest in Muskoka and in our board, has a couple of students who don't do well for whatever reason on EQAO testing, it has a far greater impact on the overall results for the school," she says. " Whereas in a larger school with more students, a couple of students not doing well does not affect the overall school results." Corriveau-Truchon says St. Dominic is a strong school academically and it measures student achievement through more than only EQAO results. She says there are other tests and exams taking place in all subjects throughout the school year, which the Fraser Institute does not have access to. "We are always concerned when the Fraser Institute uses any results to rank schools," says Corriveau-Truchon. "St. Dominic has excellent programs and very dedicated, professional staff who offer students great learning opportunities in small classroom settings." Water safe in Torrance By Corey Wilkinson and Matt Driscoll Canadian National Railway (CN) has confirmed that drinking water, near the site where railroad ties were stored last summer, is safe. The Township of Muskoka Lakes requested CN test the groundwater last fall after residents became concerned that railroad ties might have leeched creosote into the soil and water. In August, residents complained of feeling ill after CN dumped over 3,000 railroad ties at the CN site in Torrance. "We conducted the soil sample and the results were assessed by professional environmental engineers. There were no impacts to the municipal water table," says CN spokesperson Lindsay Fedchyshyn. "CN and other railroads across our industry store railroad ties like this on a regular basis, and have done so for many years " Fedchyshyn says CN provided the results to the Township in October. "We provided the full report to the municipality but we haven't heard back from them on that . . . so I assume they had no further questions or concerns," says Fedchyshyn, naming the Mayor's office and Township of Muskoka Lakes clerk Cheryl Mortimer when asked on Monday, April 1. The Township offices were closed on Monday but when asked earlier, Mortimer said the Township's Fire Department would be the department with knowledge of the report. The fire chief is currently on vacation, and no one else at the municipality or the Fire Department was able to confirm the report was received. Township Coun. Ruth-Ellen Nishikawa, who represents the ward that includes Torrance, wasn't aware of any of the testing results. The testing was conducted from Sept. 24 to 28, 2012, about one month after the ties were removed from the site on Aug. 31, 2012. Torrance resident Allan Diplock, who lives across the street from where the ties were located, is drinking bottled water and waiting for information. "I haven't heard of any results back," says Diplock. "It wasn't published, it should be. The residents would like to know." SANDER MOTOR SALES LTD. $31,975 $17,995 $14,495 $28,495 $26,995 Stock #013-17 2012 Dodge Challenger R/T 25,506 kms. Stock #1066195 2008 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT 4x4 74,312 kms. Previous Daily Rental - Stock # 012-13 2011 Dodge Caliber SXT 25,289 kms. Stock #1070510 2012 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara 15,730 kms. Stock #013-03 2012 Chrysler 300 Touring 18,154 kms. Stock #013-02 2012 Chrysler 200 Touring Convertible Coupe 19,765 kms. Stock #013-16 2012 Chrysler 300 300C 22,842 kms. Stock #1033750 2009 Jeep Patriot North 4X4 133,687 kms. $24,995 $29,975 $10,995 $14,995 Stock #011-107 2008 Jeep Commander Sport 4X4 113,985 kms. Stock #013-05 2012 Dodge Avenger SXT 23,193 kms. 412 BETHUNE DR. N., GRAVENHURST 705-687-6636 1-877-868-7565 www.sanderchrysler.com Taxes and licensing extra. See Sander Motors for details. $17,495 3 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.coms

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 4

    4 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.com District to replace retiring senior employees By Chris Occhiuzzi One senior level individual has already retired from the District of Muskoka, and three others will be joining him in the coming months. District solicitor David Royston is already gone, commissioner of planning and economic development Marg French is done in May, commissioner of finance and corporate services Stephen Cairns finishes his time in June and chief executive officer Jim Green is retiring in July. District chair John Klinck says they've begun to deal with the retirements and have already hired Jamie Clow as the new District solicitor. Klinck says they've established a mini committee to help hire replacements for Green and Cairns, which is made up of Klinck, Muskoka Lakes Mayor Alice Murphy and Huntsville Mayor Claude Doughty. They've put out requests for proposals for a consultant to help with the CEO search, while the human resources department has received a number of applications through advertising to replace Cairns. They will be meeting in the near future with those who put in proposals to consult on hiring a new CEO, while the mini committee should soon be interviewing the shortlist of two or three individuals for the commissioner of finance and corporate services position. As for replacing French, Klinck says a resolution has been passed by the planning and economic development committee to do things a little differently in this District department. Due to several projects underway, including a review of Muskoka Tourism, an airport business master plan and planning analysis in the District, Klinck says it made sense to keep things inhouse. "Rather than recruit and proceed directly to the commissioner of recruitment, we're contemplating an internal process that would see a temporary position be established until the other three studies and the service review concludes," says Klinck. Evelyn Brown, of One Muskoka, says her group believes when people retiring or voluntarily leave employment with the District, it opens up an opportunity to create efficiencies in government and save tax- payers' money. Brown says there is talent and expertise within the municipal structures of Muskoka, at either level of government and wonders why not assimilate jobs into the existing workforce. While acknowledging a solicitor is necessary and CEO might not be found in-house, One Muskoka believes the opportunity to save money can be found in other positions. "Do we have to do business in the same way?" she asks. "I know job loss is a concern, but our opinion on that is the government isn't there to create employment. However, on the other hand to use what John Klinck we've already got and not add to it, Evelyn Brown through attrition, through retirement, does make sense. So, you're not firing anyone, no one is losing their job, all you're doing is combining our resources and not adding to our costs." Klinck says he can't comment about the opportunity to save money from the budget but made a personal observation from his experience as chair. "I've been more than pleased as one of the caretakers of the public purse, so to speak, with the current structure under the current model," says Klinck. As for those retiring, outgoing CEO Jim Green says he is focused on the important work needing to be done at the District and will discuss his retirement when the time comes this summer. Royston and Cairns were unavailable for comment, but French says she's had a great career at the District and will be working with her husband at the family business, French Planning Services. French is looking forward to seeing the Official Plan unfold and says the environment is a significant part of Muskoka in terms of the people, municipal planning and the economy. She also recalls some of the projects she has really enjoyed working on during her 30 years of service. "It was very exciting to work on the Norway Memorial and to work with Norway on that," she says. "Also, the Muskoka water strategy and working with the Muskoka Watershed Council has been very important work, I've really enjoyed that. I've also enjoyed working with Muskoka Tourism and the airport is a very interesting business to work in as well." A.W. SHIER INSURANCE BROKERS LTD. won the 2012 Readers Choice Awards for Insurance Companies Across Muskoka OPEN HOUSE Stephen Darling Jason Darling David Johnson Serving Muskoka since 1945 I N V I T A T I O N Saturday April 6th 10:00 - 2:00pm NEW LOCATION! 440 Ecclestone Dr., (532 Plaza) Unit C5, Bracebridge A.W. Shier Insurance Brokers Ltd. invities you to come out to visit our new office and meet our new management team of Stephen Darling, David Johnson and Jason Darling. REFRESHMENTS & DOOR PRIZES! A.W. Shier Insurance Brokers Ltd. is an independent insurance broker specializing in personal and business insurance. The whole team is ready to serve you! Your best insurance is an Insurance Broker Brenda Fisher Bill Matthews Angela Schell Lynda Goodfellow Dawn Connell Tammy Ruddell Marlene Terry Lori McCormack 705.645.8701 532 Plaza, 440 Ecclestone Drive Unit C5, Bracebridge www.awshier.com

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 5

    MEGA SAVINGS! Pay less at Leon's! We make it easy to re-decorate your home with LOW PRICES S on Furniture! Appliances! Mattresses! And TV's! AMAZING LOW PRICE! $$ 699 699 18.2 CU. FT. REFRIGERATOR * 2 SpillSafe™ sliding glass shelves * Humidity-controlled crispers and wine rack 822-18435 RECLINE & RELAX FOR LESS! Recline and relax in true comfort on this leather look, chocolate microfi bre collection. The loveseat features a storage console with built-in cup holder to keep drinks close at hand while relaxing. End Table $249 Area Rug (5' x 8') $209 Also Available 3 Piece Sectional $1799 269-30910 / 269-30911 / 255-32765 / 937-32018 AMAZING LOW PRICE! $$ 699 699 SELF CLEAN RANGE * Smooth ceramic glass cooktop * Expandable element 822-30484 Plus! $ 100 AN SAVEWHEN EXTRA YOU BUY THE 3 PIECE PACKAGE FOR ONLY $1697 AMAZING LOW PRICE! $$ 399 399 BUILT-IN DISHWASHER * Precision Direct™Wash System * 100% fi ltered wash water and stay put door 822-24114 PAY NOTHING! NOT EVEN THE TAXES! DREAM DEAL! MONDAY - THURSDAY 9:30 A.M. - 6 P.M. FRIDAY 9:30 A.M. - 7 P.M. SATURDAY: 9:30 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. SUNDAY: 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. www.facebook.com/LeonsMuskoka LIFT TOP COCKTAIL TABLE $$ 299 299 AMAZING LOW PACKAGE PRICE $$ 899 899 46" 1080P LCD HDTV! MONDAY - THURSDAY 9:30 A.M. - 6 P.M. FRIDAY 9:30 A.M. - 7 P.M. SATURDAY: 9:30 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. SUNDAY: 10 A.M. - 5 P.M. 46" ON NOW! SAVE $200 SOFA OR LOVESEAT 699 $$ 699 LIMITED QUANTITY! AMAZING LOW PRICE! $$ 499 499 A little bit rustic, a little bit chic, the look is all-around stylish. Package * HyperReal™ picture engine for vibrant colour includes dresser, mirror, queen size headboard and one night table. * ConnectShare™ Enjoy photos and music through USB input Optional Chest $349 * 2 HDMI inputs, USB and PC input 391-04599 18 391-04599 MONTHS! FOR *O.A.C. Total purchase including all applicable taxes, electronics disposal or recycling fees where applicable and a processing fee of $89.95 (Eg. $1500 purchase with $89.95 PF equals an APR of 4.0%) are due 18 months from the date of purchase. All items available while quantities last. Prices, terms and conditions may vary according to region. Selection may vary from store to store. Not applicable to previous purchases and markdown items. All fi rst time buyers in Ontario must put down a 15% deposit on any fi nanced pick-up purchase over $1,000. Electronics disposal or recycling fees may apply. See store for details. * 5 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.comss

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 6

    6 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Cadets hit the tarmac at Norfolk naval base By Chris Occhiuzzi A group of 43 cadets and staff members from the 844 Norseman Air Cadet Squadron in Huntsville recently returned from a trip they'll never forget. The 844 Norsemen had the opportunity to visit Norfolk, Virginia, home to the largest naval base in the world, the National Air and Space Museum and get within touching distance of a squadron of F-18 fighter jets. The cadets also toured the Marine Corps Base Quantico, home to the FBI Academy and other top ranked training schools for law enforcement and military officials. "Virginia was an amazing experience because, for a lot of the cadets, they don't get the opportunity to leave even the province," says Flight Corporal Mason Smith. "My favourite place to go was Quantico. We learned a few battle strategies, which was really cool because it's what they use in the field." Corporal Josh LaRose says the excitement over the trip started the moment he found out they were going. LaRose says at first he didn't believe it. "You would never think you get that opportunity in cadets, but you do and you get to do all different sorts of stuff like that," he says. "We went to the Air and Space Museum and they had a flight simulator there. It was like you were actually in an airplane." While it was an exciting trip for all the 844 Norsemen, Sergeant Caroline Murray had an especially memorable experience. Murray received the privilege of donning a compression suit and helmet while on the tour of an F-18 squadron base. "That was the coolest thing ever," she says with a huge smile. "We got to be right in there with the F-18s in the hanger. We got to see them up close. It's my dream to Photograph: Courtesy 844 Norseman Air Cadet Squadron Recently, 34 cadets and nine staff from the 844 Norsemen Air Cadets took a unqiue trip to Virginia. Their trip included a stop at an F-18 squadron base where they saw the fighter jets up close. become an F-18 pilot." Auralee Broughton, 844 Norseman sponsoring committee chair, says this trip was made possible thanks to the, "generous support of the community and the hard work of the staff, sponsoring committee and cadets of the squadron." Commanding officer, Captain Melissa Wordragen ONE STOP MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL SERVICES 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE was especially pleased with the way her cadets handled themselves throughout the trip. She says they received high praise on their courtesy and form from both military personnel and civilians they encountered. "They conducted themselves incredibly," she says. "They represented the 844 Norsemen, their community and their country well." SERVING MUSKOKA SINCE 1945 210 Brock St., Gravenhurst Muskoka, ON Tel: (705) 687-3402 ext.6 www.gravenhurstplumbing.com info@gravenhurstplumbing.com

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 7

    Juan Calina is hosting a fundraising scrap metal drive at the Table Food Bank Huntsville on April 6 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with proceeds benefitting the Table. Paved shoulders considered Council Bites District of Muskoka Council was updated on a number of road improvement projects throughout the District. Coun. Steve Clement questioned why more paved shoulders were not being created on District roads during the reconstruction phase. Tony White, the commissioner of engineering and public works, said it all comes down to money. White said the District has a list of priority roads where paved shoulders will be installed and the roads to be reconstructed simply aren't on that list. District petitions premier District agreed to petition the provincial government in search of greater funding. A report, titled The District Municipality of Muskoka Submission to the Province of Ontario - Dispelling the Myth and Closing the Gap will be passed on to the new premiere of Ontario and various ministers. Jim Green, the District CAO, said Muskoka often falls between the cracks when it comes to funding, as it really isn't considered part of north or south Ontario any longer. With the recent change in provincial leadership, Green suggested now might be the time to raise the issue. He suggested the District seek talks with the province at the highest possible level. Town of Huntsville Pitman's Bay spending approved Town council approved spending $205,700 towards phase one of the Pitman's Bay Reconstruction project. As outlined in a staff report, the funds Turning scrap into funding Photograph: Chris Occhiuzzi will go towards a road and driveway upgrade ($15,000), to install a potable water system ($16,000), a new lodge building with change rooms attached ($145,000), to install a new septic system ($11,000) and to have a contingency fund ($18,700). There will also be $400 per month required for a facility/property staff member who will perform the weekly monitoring of water system for six months each year, while the system is charged, in order to ensure safe water supply. Demolitions on surplus lands Buildings located on 53 North Dr. and 1205 Old Muskoka Rd. in Huntsville are set to be demolished in the near future. Sitting on Town lands that were determined to be surplus last year, it was reported the structures should be torn down for safety reasons. After a request for tender was put out, Cripps Contracting was awarded 53 North Drive at $5,400 plus HST and Earl's Excavating won the contract for 1205 Old Muskoka Rd. at $9, 600 plus HST. It was also determined an allowance of $3,500 be set aside to conduct a designated substance study as per the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Funds will be taken from the capital replacement reserve account. Trees cut down at local park A lot of questions were asked after trees were cut down by Town staff at Riverside Park in mid-March. At the March 25 council meeting, it was reported the trees cut down were black willows which had become weak. This type of species, according to Town staff, are known to lose limbs as they age and this was becoming a safety issue. It was noted other species planted in the same area were having trouble receiving the appropriate amounts of sunlight due to the larger willow trees blocking out the rays. According to staff, other plants will now have a better chance to survive. Save money today and energy all year with the COUPON EVENT. Save instantly on energy-efficient products including ENERGY STAR ® CFL light bulbs, power bars with integrated timer or auto-shutoff, outdoor clotheslines, and many more. Not only will you save money right away, you will also save energy throughout the year. THE COUPON EVENT ENDS ON SUNDAY APRIL 28 TH . For complete details, including the list of participating retailers and to download coupons, visit saveonenergy.ca/coupons Subject to additional terms and conditions found at saveonenergy.ca. Funded by the Ontario Power Authority and offered by Lakeland Power. A mark of the Province of Ontario protected under Canadian trade-mark law. Used under sublicence. OMOfficial Mark of the Ontario Power Authority. Used under licence. 7 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.com

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 8

    8 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.com WHAT'S UP MUSKOKA EDITORIAL The time is now With four high-priced employees retiring from the District of Muskoka, the timing is perfect to review the amalgamation of municipal services. In reports written over the years about changing Muskoka's two-tier system or combining municipalities, a constant "con" has been the high cost of severances and packages to remove staff. If a plan is put in place to deal with those leaving as they go, many of those costs can be eliminated. It has been asked many times - but does Muskoka really need seven treasurers and CEOs? Over the course of time, the Muskoka school board has amalgamated into a much larger one, Muskoka's two hospitals have combined with one administration and even the city of Toronto has absorbed neighbouring cities much larger than any of the towns in Muskoka. Certainly, the same is coming for Muskoka's seven governments one day. Suggestions for reform, based on research by the highly qualified and dedicated volunteers of the community action group One Muskoka, have largely fallen on deaf ears. Muskoka's politicians can continue to bury their heads in the sand and ignore the inevitable but the burden to taxpayers is unwarranted. Some type of change will be required in the future as Muskoka cannot afford to continually increase taxes. It is time for Muskoka's politicians to be proactive and plan ahead. It's far better for a decision to be made locally than having one imposed by the province when Muskokans can no longer afford to pay their municipal taxes. Library is important Dear Editor: I visited the Bracebridge library the other day and saw the sign posted regarding plans for our library. The attendant suggested I write to you and make sure you realize how important this resource is to our community in Bracebridge. Over the years I have used it for childrens' programs and later teaching my children how to do research for projects. I read voraciously and could never afford to buy all the books I read. I love the feeling of a book in my hand and do not like reading on a computer or tablet. The library provides a place to sit and read, to do research on my own interests or to peruse magazines that I do not subscribe to. I have used CDs, rented videos and books on tape for trips. There is always something new to do or learn and I always head to the library as a first resource. I would like to make sure our library stays viable in our community for all the various reasons stated and many more that I may not be aware of. Nancy Baker Bracebridge Nurse practitioners work Dear Editor: In Parry Sound, the hospital has extended its reach to provide primary care to rural areas, through the use of six nurse practitioner managed nursing stations. The nursing stations contribute to keeping patients in their home communities and out of the hospital. The nurse practitioner scope is such that most of the patients' primary care needs can be met in the nursing station. The remainder of the patients can be connected to a physician through regular MD visits to the stations, through an Ontario Telemedicine visit or through a consultation on the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) made directly to their local family doctor. As a result, the West Parry Sound Health Centre has enjoyed a balanced budget for decades. Funding for the nursing stations' operating costs comes directly from the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care and is separate from the hospital funding package. Administration and supplies for the nursing stations are purchased through the West Parry Sound Health Centre and is paid from the nursing station budget to the hospital. The buildings that house the nursing stations in each of the communities are owned and operated by the township. Donations from local communities and onetime funding grants from provincial government help us purchase equipment. The nursing stations are connected to the hospital and to the local doctors' offices through a shared EMR. We have one patient record to be shared by any health care provider who sees the patient, no matter where they are seen. This provides continuity of care, reduces the need to repeat diagnostic testing, and reduces the incidence of inappropriate prescribing of medications. Technology connects rural people to urban care without the travel costs. It is an old fashion model of care where the patient comes first. It is a team approach, whereby no health care provider is competing for funding. It is affordable and it keeps the patients at home longer. It is time for Muskoka to seriously consider this model to optimize the care of its residents and keep them out of hospital. Donna Kearney Bracebridge Donald Smit h ext. 203 Publisher - Print & Digital Sandy Lockhart ext. 205 Editor - Print & Digital Matt Driscoll ext. 210 Assistant Editor Chris Occhiuzzi ext. 218 Multimedia Journalist Corey Wilkinson ext. 217 Photographer Donna Ansley ext. 209 Shannon Donnelly ext. 216 Lisa Edlington ext. 212 Martha Gillan ext. 204 Laurie Johle ext. 214 Connie Zator ext. 208 Multimedia Sales Marc Bonitatibus ext. 206 Production Manager Addie Collins ext. 207 Matthew Walker ext. 207 Design Department Angy Gliddon ext. 213 Ken Northey ext. 201 Susan Smith ext. 201 Reader Sales and Service What's Up Muskoka is published by Cottage Country Communications, a division of: Copyright© 2013, Sun Media Corp. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material published in What's Up Muskoka is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. Printed in Canada. Published weekly. Subscription Rates: Within Canada, outside of Muskoka One year $55.00 plus applicable taxes. Two years $95.00 plus applicable taxes. Canada Post Publication Sales Product Agreement Number 40025080 Address changes should be sent to the address below. How to contact us: Mail: P.O. Box 180, Bracebridge, ON P1L 1T6 Street Address: 12 - 440 Ecclestone Drive, Bracebridge Phone: (705) 646-1314 Fax: (705) 645-6424 E-mail: mm.info@sunmedia.ca Website: www.whatsupmuskoka.com FOLLOW US ON

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 9

    How to support mentorship in Muskoka OP ED WHAT'S UP MUSKOKA By Rebecca Paul I've learned that the simple act of asking is sometimes enough to prompt people to give in surprisingly generous ways. People often want to help but need to be asked. Make this, then, our public plea for support from the community to preserve mentorship in Muskoka. Last summer, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Muskoka garnered enormous public support through the Moose FM radio-thon. Our agency came uncomfortably close to closing its doors due to a lack of funding. Muskoka stood up and, with a united voice, said "we are here to help". Hearts and wallets opened and kept the program running, but the support we received then is not enough to sustain the agency indefinitely. As a non-profit charity with no regular government funding, we are 100 per cent responsible for raising money for operations and programming costs. This requires a constant flow of money coming into the agency and a rather steady flow of people willing to volunteer their time and effort. Our agency is governed by a board of directors whose level of volunteerism humbles me. Our goodhearted volunteer mentors change the lives of the youth they spend time with and they do it selflessly. We know who we are serving. It's the little girl who Dear Editor: It was in many ways satisfying to read that Ballot boxes return to Muskoka (What's Up Muskoka March 27). I am one of the - apparently few - citizens concerned about the risks of online voting. While it's potentially more convenient for the average citizen if done properly, online voting remains appallingly vulnerable to a large number of abuses and most of these vulnerabilities cannot be fixed because they are inherent to online voting. Huntsville council rightly noticed the alarming increase in successful cyber-attacks, on websites for governments, military, credit card companies and major commercial enterprises. These organizations have far larger cyber-security budgets than municipal governments or the online voting companies they hire to run elections, yet even they are compromised with a disquieting regularity. As noted, the 2010 Huntsville municipal election was plagued with logistical problems: see-through ballot envelopes requiring a second mailing, and slow or crashed service during peak usage requiring extended voting hours. But these are normal "teething" problems for a new software system, and while important, these problems can easily be fixed. What cannot be fixed, and the real reasons to avoid online voting, are the problems that are inherent to the method. These include: Vulnerability to hacking at the servers where the votes are recorded. Widespread virus attack on citizen's computers, tablets, phones etc. which are an unsecured and unsecurable part of any online voting system. Such a virus could lie silent for months, then invisibly alter the votes as they are cast, then erase itself. This bypasses any conceivable security measures at the servers. Coercion - no one can look over your shoulder as you cast a paper ballot. That's not true in your home. Rebecca Paul lost her mother last year, and if her application is approved she will sit on our waiting list until she is matched with an appropriate Big Sister when all she wants is a woman to talk to. It's the sweet boy whose dad is nothing more than an image in his head; a face he can vaguely conjure up when he really tries, which isn't very often because it hurts too much to think about. A lost boy who could spend his evenings vandalizing our community or he could spend them playing basketball and discussing Vote stealing because whoever opens the mail first, can cast all the votes for a household. That's how my neighbor's deceased dog voted in the 2010 election. Vote buying is enabled. It's impractical with paper ballots because a "purchaser" can never tell whether they got what they paid for. But by purchasing voters' unused PINs, anyone can be sure the votes they bought are cast as desired. I doubt much of this kind of abuse happened in 2010. But just watch online voting become popular and widespread, and our democratic process will become the target of some very clever, utterly ruthless and extremely unpleasant people. Any one of these and other problems could sway an election and when it does, there'll be no evidence, nothing to recount, just the wrong person in office and no one ever college options with his Big Brother. The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health recently conducted the largest ever Canadian mentoring study. Key findings of the study were that girls with a Big Sister are two and a half times more likely than girls without a mentor to be confident in their ability to be successful at school and that mentored boys are two times less likely than non-mentored boys to develop negative conducts like bullying, fighting, lying, cheating, losing their temper or expressing anger. The value of these findings is staggering! Girls with mentors are more likely to be confident and boys with mentors are less likely to engage in harmful behaviours. Here lies a direct link to tackling an issue so toxic to our society: bullying. Imagine the potential outcomes of having more confident girls and boys who are less angry. Our agency has its share of challenges to be sure but we take them on one at a time as a team. Our team is overextended and we need more players. So we ask: How do you want to help? We need dedicated board members, volunteers to help plan events and fundraisers, and mentors who are committed to enriching the lives of youth in Muskoka. Not sure how you can help us? Contact us and we'll let you know. We need you, your community awaits and the time is now. Become involved because, like us, you believe in the power of mentorship and friendship. Rebecca Paul is the executive director and a caseworker with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Muskoka. She is married with two children and proud to be a resident of Muskoka. Concerned about online voting Photograph: Corey Wilkinson knowing. The single most important fact about tampering with an election run on the internet is that it looks exactly like an honest election. Thankfully, Huntsville council has done the right thing - but other municipalities haven't and the chief electoral officers of both Ontario (Greg Essensa) and Canada (Marc Mayrand) remain committed to pilot projects for online voting. So, if you're comfortable with Ontario's premier in 2017 being chosen by a clever high school hacker in the pay of a large corporation, or Canada's prime minister in 2020 being nudged into office by a Chinese consortium wanting better access to Canada's natural resources, do not contact your MPP and MP to express your alarm. I already have. Grant Hallman Huntsville 9 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.com

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 10

    10 April 3, 2013 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Advertising Feature Planning ahead is the secret to successful projects Indoor / Outdoor New Styles for Summer Reversible Resists Colour Fade If winter is a good time for doing work inside the home, the arrival of spring also brings the opportunity to start all sorts of new projects, wherever they happen to be. From the basement to the attic, from the patio to the roof, get out the levels, hammers and brushes and leap into action! Be sure to organize your project early so that you won't run out of time and be forced to delay the work until next spring! To get started, find out as soon as you can about what's involved, from as many sources as possible, and then prepare a budget. After this is done, purchase everything you'll need to complete the work. Now you'll be even more motivated to start the work itself. Ideally you should choose a method of realizing the project which will ensure quality and durability; doing it yourself when you don't have the necessary skills is often synonymous with work to be started over... and starting over means extra costs. No one wants to end up with poor quality workmanship and having to do the work again. Be sure to get all the information you need and don't hesitate to call on the services of an expert for the work you're not 227 Wellington St., Bracebridge 705-645-7681 qualified to do. Don't forget, however, that at this time of year, qualified workers are very much in demand so they should be scheduled as quickly as possible. Once the project is completed you can sit back and admire the results of all your hard work and enjoy the summer sun... messing around in the backyard, cutting the grass; in short, making the most of summer.

Page 1 of 4

Please wait