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Newspapers | 2014-04-22 11:15:31
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    AD{MM53191} ACTING OUT A young actor from Huntsville has earned her way into a spot at an exclusive acting program. Hailey Scott will be studying Shakespeare at Stratford this summer. Page 24 Huntsville nabs lion’s share of events funding Of nearly $800,000 in Celebrate Ontario funding approved for 12 Muskoka events, over $630,000 will be split among six in Huntsville. Page 2 RUGBY FREE READY whatsupmuskoka.com April 23, 2014 By JAN PITMAN Muskoka’s rugby warriors are ready to rumble with the Dingos. Full Story – Page 22 Beer barons Page 21 Marking the Great Escape in Europe Gord Kidder traveled to Europe to mark the 70th anniversary of the Great Escape. His uncle was one of those who was killed after taking part in the famous break-out. Page 10 Photograph: Jan Pitman GOLDEN BLADES CLUBS MARK RARE SKATING HONOUR Page 23 Mac Lang’s April 26-30 OVER 200 RAM TRUCKS - NEW & USED HEMI’s - PENTASTAR V-6’s - ECO DIESEL’s TRADE-INS WELCOME HUGE SELECTION OF USED VEHICLES TOO! 700 VEHICLES ON SALE MAC LANG SELLS FOR LESS 450 Memorial Ave, Orillia 705-325-1331 1-877-813-8295 www.maclangorillia.com MAC LANG SELLS FOR LESS 78 Main Street, Sundridge 705-384-5352 1-800-268-5264 www.maclang.ca

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    AD{MM53422} 2 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com LIONS CLUB MEMBERS CONDUCT LIONS DAY OF SERVICE The Port Carling Lions Club will be serving the community by completing Spring Road Cleanup as part of the Lions Day of Service. This volunteer activity will be occurring on April 26 th , 2014 along Hwy 118. Completion of this Lions club service project is a benefit to the community because it allows The Lions club to show their support in keeping our community of Port Carling beautiful. According to Ann Pettifer, project coordinator, “Genuine service to people in our communities is the foundation of what Lions Clubs do. The Port Carling Lions Club, along with Lions Clubs from across Ontario, is proud to be part of this event. The Lions members thank everyone who contributed to this important work. You are truly helping Lions make a difference in our community.” District Governor Chris Lewis added, “On the Lions Day of Service, our Lions Clubs will be impacting the lives of tens of thousands of people. However, that is just a small portion of the remarkable things these clubs and their members do each and every day of the year.” The Port Carling Lions Club has 27 members and meets on the 2 nd and 4 th Wednesday of the month at 6:30 at Port Carling Community Centre. Lions clubs are a group of men and women who identify needs within the community and work together to fulfill those needs. For more information or to get involved with the Port Carling Lions Club, please contact Lion President Dave Hewitt at 705-765-6092 or dave.hewitt@yahoo.ca Lions Clubs International is the world’s largest service club organization with more than 1.3 million members in approximately 45,000 clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas around the world. Since 1917, Lions clubs have aided the blind and visually impaired and made a strong commitment to community service and serving youth throughout the world. For more information about Lions Clubs International, visit the Web site at www.lionsclubs.org. RETIRED? RETIRING? WANT TO STAY IN MUSKOKA LAKES but are looking for a place to live with • No lawns to cut? • No snow to shovel? • No household maintenance? The Lions Club of Port Carling is building the HUB OF THE LAKES RETIREMENT RESIDENCE An affordable apartment complex with • Your own apartment • Your own furniture • Your own patio Come to the Port Carling Community Centre on Saturday, May 3 rd 2:00 – 5:00 And see the plans for the HUB OF THE LAKES RETIREMENT RESIDENCE a partner in the Brock and Willa Wellness Centre Photograph: Corey Wilkinson Province sends big tourism dollars to Huntsville By Chris Occhiuzzi Events tourism organizers across Muskoka recently received over three-quarters of a million dollars from the provincial government Celebrate Ontario program funding. Of the twelve successful applicants from Muskoka receiving a total of just under $800,000, six in Huntsville received the lion’s share of just over $630,000. Muskoka Tourism executive director Michael Lawley is happy with the amount of funding coming into Muskoka communities. Muskoka Tourism provides support for grant applications through letters and by being named as a partner. It shows those choosing the successful applicants there is communication and co-operation among the organizers, chambers of commerce and marketing organizations, he explains. “The heavy lifting is all done by the individual applicants,” says Lawley. “Certainly this year when you look at the number of Muskoka events that were successful, it was quite remarkable.” He gives credit to the Huntsville/Lake of Bays Chamber of Commerce for helping bring five of the six successful Huntsville grants to the community. They are quite successful in sourcing and securing funds not just from Celebrate Ontario but from other organizations as well, he says. “They’re really keen and have got the talent,” says Lawley. “Huntsville has tried really hard to target shoulder season or offseason events. They’re making a conscious effort to try and build business in those times of the year, which is really smart on their part.” Celebrate Ontario helps new or existing festivals and events enhance programs, activities and services that will lead to longterm improvements. Kelly Haywood, executive director of the Huntsville/Lake of Bays Chamber of Commerce, says successful events such as Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend and the Winter Comedy Carnival led to the funding for new events and helped to grow others. This year, the chamber wrote successful grant applications for the Huntsville Half Marathon: Band on the Run ($62,560), new events Live It! A Culinary, Home & Garden Getaway ($51,000) and the Muskoka Sound Music Festival ($300,000), Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend ($93,500) and the 2015 Winter Comedy Carnival ($63,750). The Huntsville Festival of the Arts/Nuit Blanche wrote their own application and were granted $63,750. Haywood says chamber staff write the grants and either partner with organizers or take the lead on running the many events. “The events we’ve historically been funded for, which are Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend and the Comedy Festival, we have shown great growth with those events,” says Haywood. “And definitely would be considered a model for the success of the Celebrate Ontario program. It’s precisely aligned with what the province is trying to accomplish.” The chamber’s mandate to boost visitors in the shoulder season works because Celebrate Ontario grants examine how many more people will be enticed to visit each community due to an event. “Because the shoulder season is already low, the potential increase is that much higher and it helps the grant,” she says. “The potential for growth is huge because you’re bringing in thousands of people at a time when you have almost no one visiting from out of town.” With a staff of nine, including herself, Haywood says her chamber is in a unique position to utilize the different skill sets they bring to the table. “It comes with time, expertise and trial and error,” says Haywood. “Writing these grants take so long and really it needs a lot of experience to do it well. Other chambers in our area just don’t have the resources to pull this together and it’s taken years for us to develop. When I first started here it was myself and two part time staff.” “It’s not something that happens over night,” says Haywood who has been with the chamber for ten years. “When the event comes I have a mobilized team ready and able to pull off the events. That is something very unique to Huntsville.” Through the years they have received The Band on the Run half marathon race is getting Celebrate Ontario funding this year.

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    AD{MM53340} 3 Celebrate Ontario funding helps events like Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend grow. both federal and provincial funding including a recent Trillium grant for $375,000. Muskoka Lakes also will be benefitting from Celebrate Ontario funding this year with over $100,000 for The Muskoka Chautauqua Revival ($75,000) and the 30th anniversary of the Bala Cranberry Festival (over $31,000). Jane Templeton, general manager of the Muskoka Lakes Chamber says they frequently write letters of support and is thrilled the two events were successful. They are a big part of bringing visitors to the area. “We know when they come to the area, they stay and shop in the area and we know this because we’ve surveyed our visitors and surveyed our member businesses,” says Templeton. The Muskoka Lakes Chamber of Commerce also persues other funding and is in the middle part of having a third successful FedNor intern working at the chamber. In the past they have received Muskoka Community Futures and Trillium funding. “Each year we get grants from the provincial and federal governments for summer student employment,” she says. The Antique and Classic Boat Show in Gravenhurst received $23,013, the 21st annual Gravenhurst Car Show received $9,350 and the Dockside Festival of the Arts in Gravenhurst was awarded $8,925. Attempts to contact the Gravenhurst Chamber for comment were unsuccessful as of press time. The only event in Bracebridge receiving funding was Art in the Heart with just over $13,000 approved, leading some in the community to compare their town’s funding to how much other communities received. Bracebridge Chamber of Commerce general manager John Crawley says while they don’t write Celebrate Ontario grant applications, the chamber will offer letters of support when asked by individual groups or organizations. He uses the Muskoka Rails Museum and Great Muskoka Paddling Experience as examples. “When they apply for either funding or support from either a provincial or federal program, the chamber of commerce would provide a letter of support,” says Crawley. He says many in the community asking, “how come we didn’t (get as much funding as other towns or townships)?” don’t fully understand the Celebrate Ontario process of providing support to expand and grow festivals, events and celebrations. Crawley recalls being at a meeting last year which was attended by many groups from Bracebridge who were unsuccessful in funding applications to Celebrate Ontario. The meeting was facilitated by a tourism industry advisor from the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport. “She explained some of the intricacies of the application process,” says Crawley. “It was an education for those around the table and an explanation. The bottom line when it comes to any type of program, whether provincial or federal, you have to apply. That’s one thing. But the other thing too is none of those programs are 100 per cent funding and I think a lot of people don’t seem to understand that.” Crawley says the Bracebridge Chamber would be happy to offer support if an organization would ask for it. He says he knows of situations where a new organization may not want to publicize they’ve applied for funding for an event due to the presumption they may not want the competition to know about it. “It’s got nothing to do with Huntsville or Gravenhurst or Bracebridge because when you look at the list that is published of who received funding and the amount they received, look across the province,” says Crawley. “There could be 75 funding opportunities that were given and there are 600 towns. Not everyone is going to be successful. I really don’t know of how many organizations (from Bracebridge) did apply. Including the successful one, I know of three, but there could be others.” Crawley says sometimes people forget there are other support programs to apply for and says they are now in the process of examining applying for grants under the FedNor intern program. “We sometimes facilitate funding applications to Muskoka Community Futures, which is a FedNor program as well. In fact, two events were approved last week by Muskoka Futures and the chamber’s participation in that was to deliver the application as a sponsoring agent. So, there’s other things going on as well.” As Lawley notes, the distribution of the grants did reach throughout Muskoka and it signifies a recognition of having the resources to put on a great event. “It’s one thing to apply for a grant but then it’s another thing to really make them successful,” says Lawley. “When you look at the track record of Muskoka event organizers it’s really quite good, so that improves the confidence level on the part of the people who review the Celebrate Ontario program. Do these folks have the capacity to deliver? And the answer is ‘yes.’” Photograph: Chris Occhiuzzi $14,495 $23,995 $17,795 $11,295 $23,995 Former Daily Rental Stock #AN192109 2010 Chrysler Sebring Limited 23,119 kms. Former Daily Rental Stock #013-29 2012 Dodge Charger SXT 18,005 kms. Stock #9H527745 2009 Chrysler 300 300C 59,671 kms. Former Daily Rental Stock #013-26 2011 Nissan Versa 1.8S 69,351 kms. Former Daily Rental Stock #DR700735 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew 25,162 kms. Stock #013-91 Former Daily Rental 2013 Chrysler 200 Limited 25,765 kms. Stock #4D555120 2004 Dodge SX 2.0 Base 112,312 kms. Stock #DH653069 Former Daily Rental 2013 Dodge Challenger R/T 16,697 kms. Stock #BT525645 2011 Dodge Journey SXT 18,668 kms. Stock #01403 Former Daily Rental 2012 Nissan Sentra 2.0 SR 45,487 kms. 412 BETHUNE DR. N., GRAVENHURST 705-687-6636 • 1-877-868-7565 www.sanderchrysler.com Taxes and licensing extra. See Sander Motors for details. $18,495 $4,495 $35,995 $15,995 $13,495 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com

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    AD{MM53202} 4 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Huntsville BIA parking plan supported Council Bites Town of Huntsville Proposals by the Downtown Huntsville BIA to the Town’s public infrastructure and protective services (PIPS) committee regarding parking in the downtown core were well received. At the April 15 PIPS meeting, BIA manager Helena Renwick and board member Rick Birkheimer spoke to committee on a variety of parking concerns, including improved enforcement of the two-hour parking bylaw, better signage on High Street and in the River Mill Park lot and the removal of the No Parking Nov. to April sign located on the east side of Brunel Road. The committee supported the ideas and moved to make Kent Park, the RBC parking lot, the Chamber of Commerce lot and the east side of Brunel Road two-hour parking areas. Committee also moved to ensure support of the bylaw department to enforce any infractions with the help of the BIA. As well, by recommendation of Mayor Claude Doughty, the committee agreed that Kent Park become a paved lot with a creative approach to the parking layout to be taken. A recommendation was also made to install bollards on Brunel Road to delineate the parking and sidewalk area. Cultural hub at train station A presentation and recommendation to the PIPs committee on behalf of the Huntsville/Lake of Bays Chamber of Commerce, Huntsville and Area Historical Society, the Huntsville Train Station Society and Huntsville Arts Society was well supported. Those four organizations are proposing the use of the Huntsville Train Station as a cultural hub to be run by the Chamber and the Historical Society. This proposal has been in the works for several months. The Chamber of Commerce requested the Town of Huntsville rent the vacant space for the amount of $1 per year, with the Chamber managing the cultural hub and its user groups. Chamber of Commerce executive director Kelly Haywood says cultural tourism is a growing market attracting much interest. She notes the groups using the train station as a hub will help promote Huntsville. A recommendation to support the proposal will now go to council for a final decision. Council Bites Township of Muskoka Lakes Big crowds at meeting The Muskoka Lakes Township Council meeting on April 17 was moved from the council chambers to the Community Centre next door. More then 80 people attended the meeting and the maximum capacity of the council chamber was exceeded. The meeting’s agenda contained multiple petitions regarding the development at the Photograph: Jan Pitman Bala falls and public interest was huge. Local builders and contractors made their point to the council which is discussing a bylaw for year round reduced load restrictions for Township roads as well as a bylaw to restrict or prohibit rock blasting for constructions. Mayor Alice Murphy announced at the beginning of the meeting that the bylaw for reduced load restrictions would not be discussed by council during the meeting. Business reprentatives spoke. Arnie Coulson pointed out problems like drainage, overall costs and building permits if blasting were to be restricted or banned, while Lisa Overholt explained the negative impact of reduced load restrictions for businesses. Karen McGhee of Swift River Energy talked about the impact of the 14-18 month construciton period for the Bala hydro project. A temporary bridge will be built for construction traffic and the parks will remain open during construction, she said. No bridge or cranes will be positioned over the falls, she added. For the use of the parking lot during the construction period, Swift River offered a $100,000 payment to the Township, provided the agreement is made within a reasonable time frame. Council did not make any decision regarding blasting or load restrictions. Last week’s council meeting in Muskoka Lakes had to be moved to a larger venue due to high attendance. Rock blasting, load restrictions and Bala Falls were on the agenda. No one plans to fight with an insurance company... But now that you’ve been hurt, what does your future hold? At Will Davidson LLP, we can help. We offer insurance litigation services in the areas of injury, disability and death claims. With years of experience representing the injured and the wronged, we have built a solid reputation for hard work, innovation and fearless advocacy. Our focus is your fair and rightful compensation when you have been hurt. To learn more, please visit www.willdavidson.ca, or call our Huntsville office for a free consultation. Phone: 705.788.3740, or toll free 1.866.788.3740

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    AD{MM53386} 5 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com 4DAYS OF SAVINGS! Starts Thursday, May 1, 2014 8:00am Specials available only at 450 Muskoka Rd. W., Bracebridge 705-645-5261 Grand Re-Opening Store Hours Thursday & Friday Saturday Sunday 8:00am-9:pm 8:00am-6:00pm 9:00am-5:00pm See inside flap for exciting events! CHECK OUT OUR NEW FISHING & HUNTING PRO SHOP FIRE ARMS COMING SOON Announcing the launch of our new and expanded Pro Shop department! Includes new brands, new product, new layout and new categories! See page 4 for this week’s specials!

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    AD{MM53232} 6 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com MUSKOKA CAN RECYCLE MORE THAN EVER BEFORE. If it’s packaging from the grocery store, it can be recycled in your Blue Box. * Residents may use sorted Blue Boxes, clear bags, cardboard boxes, laundry baskets or similar sized open-top bins at the curb. Milk & Juice Cartons, TetraPaks Cereal Boxes, Cracker & Pasta Boxes Paper Egg Cartons & Tissue Boxes Toilet Paper Tubes & Paper Towel Tubes White & Coloured Paper Frozen Concentrated Juice Packages Magazines, Catalogues & Phone Books Newspapers & Inserts Yogurt Containers & Fruit Cups Aluminum Foil & Trays Metal Food & Beverage Cans Styrofoam Meat Trays, Cups & Plates Empty Aerosol Cans Empty & Dry Paint Cans PAPER PRODUCTS CONTAINERS or call Muskoka Public Works at 705-645-6764 Muskoka Recycles @MuskokaRecycles

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    AD{MM52990} AD{MM52897} Clinic staff tighten belts to raise hunger awareness By Chris Occhiuzzi The North Muskoka Nurse Practitioner-led Clinic in Huntsville is ready to do its part to bring light to an important issue. The entire staff at the clinic are participating in a Hunger Awareness Week challenge to live off of only $120 for a week. That includes buying food, toiletries, etc. Hunger Awareness Week takes place from May 5 to 9. Hunger Awareness Week is a Food Banks Canada initiative aimed at raising awareness of the hunger issue in Canada. The clinic decided they would champion the hunger issue because so many of the people they service are in tough financial situations and have trouble providing for themselves and their families with proper nutrition. The clinic’s dietician Holly Brown says they want their patients to be healthy and eat healthy. However, they have noticed the extent of the financial difficulties for those living on restricted or lower incomes. She says once they began delving into the cost of healthy eating in Simcoe- Muskoka, the realization of how hard the struggle is truly hit home. According to the 2013 survey results on the Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit Website, the cost of the Nutritious Food Basket for a family of four living in Simcoe Muskoka would be $181.41 per week or $786.11 per month. The family of four referenced includes a man and a woman between 31 and 51 years of age, a girl aged 4 to 8 and a boy aged 14 to 18. “When we talked to a lot of our patients, once they’ve paid their rent and bills, they’ve got about $50 a week left for food if they’re single,” says Brown. “And a family of four about $120 a week. That’s for fresh food. We are going to challenge ourselves to try to see how we could do, each of us, living on that amount of food and the challenges of preparing healthy food according to Canada’s Food Guide when we’re busy, going to work, dealing with rent, bills and other issues.” Brown wonders about how they will be able to eat healthy. She says relying on food banks, friends or family for a food supply is a very real possibility. She says this challenge will help bring awareness to how important the food banks are and how hard it can be to afford to eat healthy. The North Muskoka Nurse Practitioner-led Clinic’s staff are also putting out the challenge to anyone else in Huntsville and the rest of Muskoka to do the same. CHRONIC BACK PAIN? Have You Considered Spinal Decompression Therapy? MY BACK STORY... I suffered with constant back pain for over 6 years. It was getting worse with time. Both my work and hobbies were becoming more and more difficult to enjoy. I had tried various ways of dealing with it, with little success. Both my mom and dad lived with chronic back and sciatic issues as well. They tried Spinal Decompression Therapy and to their amazement they no longer have back pain or sciatica! Shortly after, a good friend of mine was reporting remarkable improvements with his chronic back pain through Spinal Decompression Therapy. Naturally, I began to think if it helped them, perhaps it would help me as well. I soon began receiving Spinal Decompression Therapy. Then weeks later my back pain was gone! I can now confidently wade in the river, fish for hours and not suffer afterward. I feel like Spinal Decompression Therapy has given me a new lease on life! Darrell L. hot seats .cool events .year-round algonquintheatre.ca UPCOMING PERFORMANCES! ABohemian Rhapsody -Muskoka Rock Choir Fri., April 25, 2014 •7:30pm Muskoka Rock Choir Presents “A Bohemian Rhapsody”, ARock and Roll concert featuring hits from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s in a choral setting. The Muskoka Concert Band •Sun., April 27 •2:00 PM The Muskoka Concert Band, under the direction of Neil Barlow, is back at the theatre once again to offer awide variety of musical treats in acelebration of spring. Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers Thur., May 8, 2014 •7:30 PM For 30 years these Newfoundlanders have won audiences over with their blend of wacky humour, colourful characterizations, and sweetly sung homespun ballads Lift Me Up -Huntsville Community Choir •Fri., May 23, 2014 •7:30 PM The Huntsville Community Choir is a50+ voice choir of singers with areputation for high quality and engaging, heartfelt performances. Song Project Friday, May 30 •7:30pm The Song Project features an amazing two-hour performance showcasing 15 Huntsville High School vocalists singing avariety of pop, rock and new country songs backed by an all-star faculty/student 10-piece band. JJ Dance &Performing Arts Saturday, May 31 •1:30 &6:30pm 1:30 -Mini/Junior Year-end showcase 7 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com ALGONQUIN CHIROPRACTIC 17 West Street, North, Huntsville, ON Dr. Doug Neudorf, 705-787-1001 D.C., B.P.H.E. Box Office 705.789.4975 1-877-989-4975 37 MAIN ST. EAST, HUNTSVILLE WEBSALES 24/7 algonquintheatre.ca

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    8 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com WHAT’S UP MUSKOKA EDITORIAL In the money First off, kudos to the Huntsville/Lake of Bay Chamber of Commerce who in partnership with the Town of Huntsville, the Downtown Huntsville BIA and Muskoka Tourism have been approved for $570,810 in grants from Celebrate Ontario (The Huntsville Festival of the Arts/ Nuite Blanche received another $63,750.) It seems obvious that a lot can happen with co-operation and hard work. But something must be said about the rest of Muskoka and the fact that combined, it only received just over $200,000. Organizations across Muskoka need to look to Huntsville to see what they have done right. One also has to wonder about Muskoka Tourism and their ability to help make this happen in other places. While it is great that they worked with Huntsville, they are also responsible for promoting all Muskoka. They must have some knowledge to share with other communities. The Huntsville Chamber has a large staff but a few extra people seem to be worth the cost, if they bring in this kind of funding. And the grants dollars are just the start, this kind of money is compounded when the events hit the community. Guests are drawn to the area, to stay at local accommodations, shop, eat at restaurants and enjoy Huntsville activities. Those who don’t apply, or do a poor job on applications, won’t be seeing any grant money. The value of these events is written all over downtowns across Muskoka. Those that bring fresh and exciting events seem to be the ones prospering, while those with the same stale events languish as businesses close. Luckily, Muskoka has an expert in Huntsville from which everyone can learn. Dinner appreciated Dear Editor: The Bracebridge Out of the Cold program is a wonderful thing. I recently read the article – Dedicated volunteers prepare dinner in What’s Up. Ever since I started going to these dinners, I’ve noticed how happy the people are there. Old friends reunite or meet new friends. There is a table with donations of soap and shampoo to name a few. This table gets cleared very quickly. There is a fruit and vegetable table and everyone gets to take some home. Volunteers spend all day shopping, preparing meals, changing the gym into a dining room and cleaning. I can’t imagine what it takes every week. The organizers of these dinners at the Legion and at all the churches involved are greatly appreciated. Thank you. Sandy Smith Bracebridge Smokers follow example Dear Editor: In your article on April 9 –Town council takes aim at high school smokers – solutions mentioned include detentions or money fines for these youthful offenders, but they do not provide any real help. The real solution lies in a much wider societal action. The situation raises several questions: Who commits the illegal act of supplying these kids with cigarettes? What examples do they have? Why does our society not have the political will to outlaw smoking to anyone under 19 years, just like drinking? Why do we not have the fortitude to stop selling tobacco altogether? Until we own up to this problem of addiction collectively, the school board and town council will be quite powerless. Let’s face it, these student see their elders outside restaurants, and movie theatres doing the same thing and that appears to be okay. At one time the school board provided an area for the cigarette addicts. That seemed a sensible solution until education can kick in and make students see the drawbacks of smoking in relation to their health, their finances and the environment. Arno Liebster Bracebridge Welcome northern visitors Dear Editor: On March 4, 15 students and two teachers from Bracebridge Muskoka Lakes Secondary School (BMLSS) embraced the cold as they headed up north to Whale Cove, Nunavut. This trip, with a gracious donation from the YMCA, was to promote youth leadership by having all 15 students plan the trip. We wanted to experience a new and exciting culture and that we did. We were greeted with open arms and loving hearts. The Whale Cove students arrived in Bracebridge last Friday. Be on the lookout for our guests, Bracebridge! We will be providing them with an experience of a lifetime. Molly Hansen Bracebridge and Muskoka Lakes Secondary School Curtis Armstrong ext. 203 Publisher – Print & Digital Sandy Lockhart ext. 205 Editor – Print & Digital Matt Driscoll ext. 210 Assistant Editor Chris Occhiuzzi ext. 218 Multimedia Journalist Jan Pitman ext. 217 Photographer Donna Ansley ext. 209 Shannon Donnelly ext. 216 Martha Gillan ext. 204 Laurie Johle ext. 214 Aussa Penniall ext.211 Multimedia Sales Marc Bonitatibus Production Manager Amanda Ladd Graphic Designer Angy Gliddon ext. 213 Ken Northey ext. 201 Reader Sales and Service What’s Up Muskoka is published by Cottage Country Communications, a division of: Copyright© 2014, Sun Media Corp. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material published in What’s Up Muskoka is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. Printed in Canada. Published weekly. Subscription Rates: Within Canada, outside of Muskoka One year $55.00 plus applicable taxes. Two years $95.00 plus applicable taxes. Canada Post Publication Sales Product Agreement Number 40025080 Address changes should be sent to the address below. How to contact us: Mail: P.O. Box 180, Bracebridge, ON P1L 1T6 Street Address: 12 – 440 Ecclestone Drive, Bracebridge Phone: (705) 646-1314 Fax: (705) 645-6424 E-mail: mm.info@sunmedia.ca Website: www.whatsupmuskoka.com FOLLOW US ON

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    AD{MM53247} Donating organs OP ED WHAT’S UP MUSKOKA to save lives By Sandra Holdsworth Seventeen years ago my life changed forever, thanks to a selfless gift from a stranger and their family. In May 1992 I was diagnosed with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a rare liver disease, and Crohn’s disease. This diagnosis came after many years of doctor visits and tests, so in a way it was good to finally know. I was 28 and was told that by the time I was in my 40 or 50s I would require a liver transplant. I soon found myself attending meetings to learn about liver disease and Crohn’s and in 1996 I was referred to the Toronto General Hospital Transplant Team. That summer, I was listed for a liver transplant and the wait began. I was fortunate to receive my life-saving transplant after just eight months of waiting. Looking back at my symptoms, I know now that I would not have lived much longer without the unselfish gift from my donor and their family who honoured their wishes. This life altering experience has led me to be the person I am today. I have become an advocate for organ donation and transplantation awareness and during the last 17 years I have met many other people who have been touched by organ donation: recipients, donor family members, living donors, and those who are currently waiting for a transplant. Many people die waiting because there simply aren’t enough organs to meet the need. My journey led me to do outreach at events and bring awareness to organ donation through public speaking. That I have lived 17 years since my transplant shows that organ donation works. I – and thousands of others – are living proof. I’ve even had the chance to compete at the Canadian and World Transplant Games, which are an opportunity for recipients to come together for competition and camaraderie. As an advocate, I volunteer for Trillium Gift of Life Network, I am the current director of the Canadian Transplant Association, Ontario Division, and am working on establishing the Muskoka Gift of Life Association. We have a small group of volunteers here in Muskoka, mostly people who have been personally touched by organ donation, but we are always looking to connect with others who have been impacted by organ donation. Next week is National Organ Donation Awareness Week and our group will be busy with awareness booths at the Service Ontario Offices as well as the Muskoka Algonquin hospitals in both Bracebridge and Huntsville. If you are interested in joining Muskoka Gift of Life Association, contact Sandra at 705-687-4424 or e-mail her at muskokagiftoflife@bell.net People can also help by registering their consent to organ and tissue donation. The current registration rate in Ontario is 24 per cent. We’re doing better than that in Muskoka with 40 per cent of residents registered, but there are communities in the province that have reached 50 per cent, so let’s strive to be one of the top communities in Ontario. Registration is easy. It takes just two minutes online at www.beadonor.ca, or people can register at a ServiceOntario Centre or through the mail by completing a Gift of Life consent form. A signed paper donor card does not mean you are registered. The impact of organ and tissue donation is profound not just for the recipients, but for the donor families who often feel a sense of comfort in a time of loss to know their loved one was able to help others. I am forever grateful to my donor and their family for giving me a second chance at life. April 20 through 27 marks National Organ & Tissue Donation Awareness Week, and for Gravenhurst resident, and 17 year liver transplant recipient, Sandra Holdsworth, this week gives an opportunity to get the awareness out about how organ donation can save lives. Mac Lang’s April 26-30 Pentastar V-6 36HWY MPG Stk#295502 Stk#295502 OWN $168 IT $28990 $28990 QUAD CAB 4X4 Bi-Weekly $0 Down 96 months @ 4.29% apr HEMI’s - PENTASTAR V-6’s - ECO DIESEL’S S +hst NO ADMIN FEES OVER 200 RAM TRUCKS - NEW & USED HEMI’s - PENTA Stk#280915 JEEP WRANGLER Amped OWN $169 IT $28990 +hst $0 Down 96 months @ 4.29% apr 96 months Bi-Weekly NO ADMIN FEES Stk#246104 Stk#246104 Ultimate Family Edition +hst +hst Bi-Weekly $0 Down OWN IT NO ADMIN FEES $ 162 $27990 96 months @ 4.29% apr NO A OWN $125 IT CANADA VALUE PKG 125 $ 1 $21890 +hst Bi-Weekly $0 Down 96 months @ 4.29% apr 96 months NO ADMIN FEES Stk#125910 9 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Sandra Holdsworth, Coun. Heidi Lorenz, Gravenhurst Mayor Paisley Donaldson, Jean Vardon, Bruce Vardon and Coun. Sandy Cairns champion the Be A Donor cause. Photograph: Jan Pitman MAC LANG SELLS FOR LESS 78 Main Street, Sundridge 705-384-5352 1-800-268-5264 www.maclang.ca TRADE-INS WELCOME MAC LANG SELLS FOR LESS 450 Memorial Ave, Orillia 705-325-1331 1-877-813-8295 www.maclangorillia.com Financing Example: $20000.00 borrowed over 48 months at 4.29%. Cost of borrowing is $1726.00

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    AD{MM53002} 10 April 23, 2014 www.whatsupmuskoka.com Muskokan honours uncle’s role in Great Escape By Matt Driscoll The Great Escape is one of the most compelling stories to emerge from the Second World War and one that was later immortalized in film. For one Muskoka resident it’s also an important part of his family history and a link to his namesake. Gordon Kidder was a Flight Lieutenant and one of 50 prisoners of war (PoWs) murdered following their escape from Stalag Luft III and subsequent re-capture. Gordon Kidder’s nephew Gord Kidder, for whom he is named, recently made a pilgrimage of sorts from his home in Port Sydney back to the site of the original Great Escape and the town in which Gordon was caught, along with a fellow escapee, and shot. The trip coincided with the 70th anniversary of the Great Escape. “I was among many of the family members of different airmen who were in the camp,” says Kidder. “When we saw how the 50 were honoured, it was quite an emotional event.” Kidder attended ceremonies at the site of the former Stalag III camp near Sagan, Poland, along with Ted Barris, the author of The Great Escape: A Canadian Story, who accompanied Kidder from Canada. Barris also spoke during an event at the Canadian Embassy in Poland, primarily discussing the Canadian role in the Great Escape, which was largely glossed over in the film version of the events. Gordon Kidder, originally from St. Gord Kidder of Port Sydney recently traveled to Europe to help honour his uncle. Catharines, was a vital cog in the plans to escape Stalag III. The newly built camp had been created by the Germans specifically to keep PoWs from escaping, as they frequently did, but plans were already underway for an escape when Gordon arrived. “The Germans thought that Stalag III was inescapable,” says Kidder. “But they had put all of these escape experts together in one camp . . . and they felt it was their duty to escape.” Kidder was flying his ninth mission as a navigator when his plane was shot down, breaking his leg in the process. He was Photographs: Courtesy Gord Kidder fished out of the North Sea by a German U-boat and sent to Stalag III. Gordon was an accomplished linguist and University of Toronto grad who spoke five languages: English, French, Spanish, Russian and German. He had plans to further his studies on a scholarship to Johns Hopkins University in the U.S. when the Second World War intervened. “He taught the other PoWs some conversational German to help them when they escaped,” says Kidder. The plan unfolded on March 24, 1944, when 76 allied prisoners made their escape. Gordon Kidder escaped along with British PoW Tom Kirby-Green and the pair managed to cover 400 km in their 72 hours of freedom before the Gestapo caught up with them in what is now the Czech Republic. Both men were handcuffed and interrogated before they were shot by the side of the road. Kidder made the leg of the trip from Poland to the Czech Republic following Barris’s departure back to Canada. For this section of the journey he was joined by Kirby-Green’s son, who lives in England. “In this village, which is adjacent to Ostrava, there was a memorial put up to my uncle and Kirby Green where they were murdered,” says Kidder. “There was a fellow who was in the Stalag Luft III camp that was from this particular town, when he got out after the war he was instrumental in having this memorial put up.” Of the 76 men who took part in what came to be known as the Great Escape, 50 were executed, 23 were recaptured and three found their way to freedom. Gordon Kidder was a navigator who was killed following the Great Escape. YOUR HEALTH President’s own story: 15 years ago Istarted to have arthritis, prostate, kidney, snoring and sleep apnea problems, which were all helped quickly with natural health products. Imade it my life’s purpose to help others. Nick A. Jerch ARTHRITIS Source of calcium for the maintenance of good health. Helps to relieve joint pain associated with osteoarthritis. 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Many people on our website write: “Can walk again for hours”;”Can climb stairs without hanging on to railing”;”First #1 NPN 80042283 time in 15 years can sleep at night” Arthritis Pain in joints down 90%, same for my sister… hundreds of testimonials all with full names and towns. Shark bones/cartilage was a previously thrown away by-product of the food industry. No sharks are caught for their cartilage. Don’t let any activist confuse you. Tryyour local health food stores first. If they don’t have it and don’t want to order it for you, order on our website or call us with Visa or Mastercard. 1-800-333-7995 www.BellLifestyle.com Bell uses the power of nature to help put life back into your lifestyle 100% Truthful testimonials with full name and towns. Real people you can call, if you want more reassurance. More testimonials on the Bell website. No money is paid for testimonials.To ensure this product is right for you, always read label and follow the instructions. 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