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Focus on Sudbury 2015
Newspapers | Community / Lifestyle / Advertisement / Tourism & Travel 2015-09-18 09:03:32
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    AD{TS4151753} AD{TS4151513} GREATER SUDBURY Despite being a big city, we still have a sense of community Don’t worry, be happy! Especially if you live here JENNY LAMOTHE For The Sudbury Star A ccording to Statistics Canada, Greater Sudbury has the highest number of happy people in the country. When the study was first published, Sudburians were glad to hear the news, and for the most part, it cemented what they already knew — this city is a great place to live. However, some media outlets had a collective hissy fit. Th e Toronto Star published their article in a tone believing the study just couldn’t be right. “With its giant smokestack and remote location at the top of Georgian Bay, few would consider Sudbury a must-see destination,” said Robin Levinson King in her article. Guess she better speak to the more than a million people that visited Greater Sudbury in 2012 alone. Then, not only did Kelly McParland of the National Post insinuate that it “makes no sense at all” and that “someone at Stats Can must be into the happy sauce,” but the headline read “Tuesday’s Reasons to Fear for Humanity …” Toronto ranked second last. Must be what your mother meant when she said, “They’re just jealous.” With everything to see and do here in Greater Sudbury, how could they not be? City of lakes No conversation about how great Sudbury is starts with anything but the outdoors. Play in the bush, as little as five minutes from work or home, enjoy the leaves changing or the bright green of spring — even winter is more enjoyable. Dressed properly, winter outdoors is a great way to enjoy the city — you even get to talk about the “dry cold” that’s so much better here. But it’s not just outdoor recreation. vvGreater Sudbury has some of the finest educational institutions in the country. Cambrian College, College Boreal, as well as Laurentian University with a medical school and a school of architecture, all offering amazing programs and experiences for students. WE PAY LESS, AND SO DO YOU. With 1,000 stores in our buying group, we can get the lowest prices from the best flooring manufacturers and pass the savings on to you. 2 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015 2 The Finest Health Food Supplements and Organic Foods • Cholesterol & Heart Health • Bone & Joint Health • Detoxification • Energy Support • Weight Loss • Digestive Care • Libido Enhancers • Prostate Support • Vitamin/Mineral Supplements • Organic Foods • Wheat/Gluten Free Products • Natural Skin Care Cosmetics • Bulk Foods • Homeopathic & Herbal Remedies 1191 Montrose Ave • 705-566-3820 • www.durhamnatural.com Curious about new floors? Choosing new flooring can be overwhelming. We’re here to make it easy Hyland Carpet One Floor & Home 250 Lorne Street, Sudbury, ON P3C 4P7 | 705–675–6566 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015

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    AD{TS4151509} The innovations happening here are also consistently worthy of note. Not only is Greater Sudbury a world-renowned centre for mining, but on a regular basis there are new businesses opening that offer something to greater Sudbury that can’t be found anywhere else. The arts and cultural events here in Greater Sudbury are for every taste. There is the Sudbury Theatre Centre and many independent theatres and groups that create must-see shows. Art galleries showcase the best work of local artists and those from around the globe and new showcases for musicians and cultural events are being proposed even now. Cinefest Sudbury is a continual success as well, drawing visitors and cinephiles from all over Ontario and the world to the exciting and interesting film festival. But above all, it is the sense of community that is proudly held here. It would appear that no one mentioned to most Sudburians that they live in a big city now, and can carry big-city egos. Greater Sudbury is a city full of people exhibiting neighbourly behavior; a community that gets bigger, and more intimate, with each passing year. So, let them whine, let them shudder in disbelief. When you write off Greater Sudbury, you’re the one missing out. Sudbury Star file photos Focus on Sudbury 2015 Friday, September 18, 2015 | THE SUDBURY STAR Focus on Sudbury 2015 Friday, September 18, 2015 | THE SUDBURY STAR 3 3

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    AD{TS4151637} 4 Cambrian College president Bill Best is ready to welcome students for the 2015-16 school year in Greater Sudbury. JENNY LAMOTHE For The Sudbury Star H CAMBRIAN COLLEGE Future of education strategic planning engaged more than 9,500 people appiness could be defined as doing what you love every day, and a post-secondary education is a way to secure a satisfying career for yourself; a way to learn what the working world will demand, and to train to meet those needs. Cambrian College has not only strived to do this, but has succeeded in their goal. In April of this year, a provincial survey done by Colleges Ontario, revealed that Cambrian College graduates are ranked best in Ontario by employers. More than 95% of employers who participated in the annual survey responded that they were “satisfied or very satisfied” with their new hires, which included graduates from Cambrian College programs in 2013-14. “Anytime we can affirm what we do here at Cambrian is really a testament to the dedication of our faculty and staff towards ensuring that our students are learning what they need to find success in the workplace,” says Bill Best, president of Cambrian College. Cambrian’s Board of Governors and President Bill Best invite you to celebrate with them as they unveil a new and exciting vision for the future of Cambrian College and the community. JOIN US FOR THE BIG REVEAL A year ago, the College began an ambitious journey to include the community in the development of its next strategic plan. Join Cambrian as it takes its first steps towards a vibrant future you have helped to shape. Tuesday, September 29 • 3 p.m. Cambrian Student Life Centre • Free parking in Lot 15 Hors-d’oeuvres and light refreshments will be served RSVP to strategicplanning@cambriancollege.ca 4 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015

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    AD{TS4151627} Striving to be the best Though some would be tempted to rest on their laurels after seeing gratifying results like that, the staff and faculty at Cambrian continue looking to the future, striving to be the best for their students. That future planning started last year, with the launch in November of their Strategic Planning Process. Creating the ‘Strat Pack’ As Best was facing not just his first year in a new city, but also a new job, he enlisted the help of 50 to 60 volunteers from the college — affectionately known as the “Strat Pack” — and they endeavoured to speak to every person they could. At first, the process began with volunteers trying to speak to everyone face to face, trying to find out what the employers, students and prospective students were looking for in a Cambrian College education. They even spoke to students in grades seven and eight, to hear what they were passionate about learning. However, it was the addition of their social media presence (#futurecambrian), as well as www.futurecambrian.ca, that got the response they were looking for. “Looking back, we wanted to ensure we had student involvement and feedback. I would go to the student centre and sit at a table and talk to students to get them energized by the process, but apparently, social media is way more energizing than me,” says Best. After the launch of the social media campaign, ideas could come from those who had geographic barriers; alumni living in other areas or employers looking for skilled trades could make their ideas known. The response almost doubled overnight. Now, with more than 9,500 engagements under their belt — 6,103 in-person engagements, 3,560 online, 29 roundtable discussions and eight focus groups (featuring 167 participants) — the Cambrian College “Strat Pack” can feel they have heard all the voices they could. “We talk about trying to speak to everyone, and though it’s an impossible task, it was our goal. We really did provide the opportunity for everyone to have a shot at telling us what they think, and all of that feedback has contributed to our end result,” Best says. Chief Administrative Officer Lead the dynamic and professional management team of Canada’s Happiest City as we continue to build this beautiful community! Over the past 30 years, the City of Greater Sudbury has matured into a diversified and vibrant urban centre with an economy focused on mineral resources, services and technology, education, government, health services/research and tourism. A global centre for mining with world-renowned attractions, urban comforts and four-season outdoor adventures, Greater Sudbury continues to surprise and impress. The municipality – the largest in northern Ontario – is home to more than 330 lakes and offers an unmatched mix of rural and urban living only a three and a half hour drive or a 45 minute flight from the Greater Toronto Area. A dynamic and diverse regional capital for the 550,000 people of Northeastern Ontario, Greater Sudbury is enjoying an economic, cultural and environmental transformation. As the City’s Chief Administrative Officer, you will play a lead role as the City continues to grow by harnessing the power of local businesses, institutions, community groups and citizens. You will assume responsibility for strategic planning, customer service and the leadership of all municipal departments of the City of Greater Sudbury. Working with Mayor and Council, you will prepare and administer the annual business plan and oversee the effective utilization of the City’s human and Qualified candidates should submit their resumes in confidence by Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 4:30 p.m. Candidates may e-mail, fax or mail their resume to: Human Resources and Organizational Development Department c/o The City of Greater Sudbury P.O. Box 5000, Station “A” 200 Brady Street Sudbury, Ontario P3A 5P3 fax: (705) 673-3094 e-mail: hrjobs@greatersudbury.ca Please ensure to clearly indicate competition number EO15-403 on your application. Come Grow with Us! Lead one of Canada’s major regional capitals. Embrace a challenging and rewarding opportunity. Find yourself in a great Northern Ontario lifestyle. financial resources, including budgets and performance metrics. You will work with your senior staff to implement policies and programs established by Council, continually review expenditures, organizational structures and operational practices, and act as a principal advisor to the Mayor and Council on business matters and the ongoing economic development of the City. In addition to your university degree and senior level managerial experience in a large diversified organization, you have demonstrated a sound knowledge of advanced business management practices. A passionate and effective leader, you will be expected to champion the various initiatives of the City of Greater Sudbury with its citizens, stakeholders and other government agencies. French / English bilingualism would be an asset. You are a leader that develops and implements strategies to achieve desired outcomes and drives for results. As an exceptional communicator, you can motivate a broad range of professional and operational employees toward a compelling vision of the future for Greater Sudbury. Your collaborative approach and strategic orientation will help build organizational capability in the long term. For more detailed information on this position, please visit our website at www.greatersudbury.ca/jobs. The City of Greater Sudbury is dedicated to maintaining a fair and equitable work environment, and welcomes submissions from all qualified applicants. Personal information submitted will be used for the purpose of determining suitability for this competition only in accordance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. All applicants are thanked for their interest in this position. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. If contacted, and you require a disability related accommodation in order to participate in the recruitment process, you must advise the Hiring Manager. Photos by GINO DONATO The Sudbury Star www.greatersudbury.ca Cambrian College president Bill Best chats with new student, Nicholas Ryma. Focus on Sudbury 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015 Friday, September 18, 2015 | THE SUDBURY STAR Friday, September 18, 2015 THE SUDBURY STAR 5 5

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    COLLEGE BOREAL Anticipating labour market trends and needs SARAH LASHBROOK For The Sudbury Star Exciting things are happening at College Boreal, as it celebrates its 20th anniversary. Celebration parties and events have been held, but that’s not the only great thing College Boreal has going on to recognize all that it have achieved. “We are now focusing on welcoming the new students this year,” says Jacqueline Gauthier, College Boreal’s senior advisor of communications and public affairs. “We are also looking at creating a builder’s wall of people who are identified as large contributors to either the establishment or growth of College Boreal over our 20 years of operating.” College Boreal also recently launched a five-year strategic plan. This plan includes new programs, new partnerships, as well as quality improvements to both the programs and management. Recently adding three new programs: Agriculture, architecture and mining. Introducing new programs Gauthier is quick to add that these were not part of the new strategic plan, but rather a part of their regular business operations. More new programs are on the way. “One of the projects for the first year of the strategic plan is to establish a mechanism to anticipate labour market trends. We are trying to put together a sort of mechanism to allow us to get a better sense of what is going on in the labour market and to try and recognized where the needs are,” says Gauthier. Continued on page 14 College Boreal president Pierre Riopel stands next to a showcase full of college memorabilia from the past 20 years. GINO DONATO The Sudbury Star 6 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015 AD{TS4151679} 6 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015

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    AD{TS4151519} AD{TS4133164} THE ARTS Expansions to improve patrons experience SARAH LASHBROOK For The Sudbury Star Greater Sudbury is such a hot spot for the arts, that both the Sudbury Theatre Centre (STC) and the Art Gallery of Sudbury (AGS) have expansions in the works to meet the needs of patrons to their establishments. STC is going first with its expansion, looking to begin the first stage of their multi-phase plan this month. “It’s really to update the lobby and lounge area here at STC, for a few reasons. The building was built in 1984, so I think the public space is a little dated. But it’s also about improving patron experience,” says Caleb Marshall, STC artistic and executive director. “So it’s not just an esthetic improvement, it will look fresher and a little bit more contemporary and hopefully reflective our values here.” One thing they are changing is ticket pick-ups. You will not need a ticket to get into the building anymore. Tickets will be taken in the theatre not at the door, so everyone is welcome to come into the building to see art and have a drink in the lounge. The STC is also looking to add a portable bar station, as well as upgrading the old bar area. “The bar (area) is being retooled into a cabaret and we are having a stage built in there. We have a beautiful grand piano and we are replacing the furniture with nice cafe tables and chairs,” says Marshall. “We are really trying to create a welcoming environment in that space, which can also function as its own venue.” The Art Gallery of Sudbury has renovations plans, as well. “We currently have a new gallery committee, which has been working on looking at either expanding our current site or going to a new site,” says Karen Thistle, manager of development and communication for the AGS. “These decisions are still in their early stages of work.” The renovations for AGS are a necessity. The Renovating Photos by JOHN LAPPA The Sudbury Star the arts The Art Gallery of Sudbury will feature the work of Lynn Johnston, artist of For Better or For Worse, until Nov. 1. gallery has so many students enrolled in their education classes, as well as many exhibits that are waiting to be displayed, which they need more room to house it all. “We are bursting at the seams,” says Thistle. Although the AGS is in early stages right now, they hope to have expansion answers in the near future. “This is a really great time to come to the gallery. The exhibit that is on now is For Better or For Worse, the comic work of Lynn Johnson,” says Thistle. This is the first time Johnson’s work has been exhibited in a gallery. The AGS approached Johnson about doing a show and she was thrilled when they asked her to join in this endeavor. Caleb Marshall, artistic executive director of the The STC and the AGS are looking Sudbury Theatre Centre, is in the lounge area, which will happily towards the future, with become a small performance venue and called the Vale Cabaret. both having plans of improving patron experience. They hope to give more access to services to those in the City of Greater Sudbury looking to get their fill of arts, right here, in their own backyards. Home of the GONGA Burger &Famous All Day Breakfast Where Friends &Family Get together Affordable Family Dining With 3Locations to Serve YouBetter •1-233 Brady St. Sudbury, ON (705) 670-1770 Focus on Sudbury 2015 •467 Falconbridge Hwy. Sudbury, ON (705) 521-1451 www.gongasgrill.ca •3098 Falconbridge Hwy.Garson, ON (705) 693-9304 Dine In or Take Out Available throughout Northern Ontario through Quality dealers. Visit www.brownsconcrete.com/where-to-buy.html •Concrete Blocks • Bagged Cement & Sand • Paving Stone • Retaining Walls • Brick & Stone 3075 Herold Drive - Sudbury (705) 522-8220 7 Friday, September A tradition 18, 2015 in| concrete THE SUDBURY as strong STAR as family Focus on Sudbury 2015 Friday, September 18, 2015 | THE SUDBURY STAR 7

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    8 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Phase Two of project is using new wood product JENNY LAMOTHE For The Sudbury Star The Laurentian School of Architecture is a revolutionary school for Northern Ontario — the first of its kind. And with this spirit in mind, the designers and architects of the school’s new downtown home, have created a building that is revolutionary in the industry, representing the most significant use of a new wood product in a public building in Ontario. Talk about a great learning experience for students. Phase Two of the project has seemingly gone up overnight, with walls and structures appearing much quicker than usual. This is because of the use of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT). CLT is an engineered wood panel typically consisting of three, five or seven layers of lumber, oriented at right angles to one another and then glued to form structural panels with exceptional strength, dimensional stability and rigidity. Because of this structural integrity, CLT is gaining popularity for its use on walls, floors and roofs — with the option of leaving the very aesthetically pleasing interior exposed. Additionally, the CLT panels can be made in any size — with only transportation issues to govern the dimensions — are prefabricated and can have openings for doors and windows pre-cut during manufacturing. It’s for these reasons the new building has gone up so quickly. In addition to the strength and ease of build CLT panels provide, they are re-inventing the industry as fast as they go up. The Laurentian School of Architecture is leading the way, using these new methods to create a great space for students, as well as teaching them the sustainable building practises the school prides itself on encouraging. CLT is also the environmental choice. The use of wood in building reduces carbon emissions by more than 150 metric tons, as compared to conventional. According to naturally:wood, a governmentpartnered information source for wood building: “When considered over a building’s lifetime — from harvest of raw materials through manufacturing, transportation, Revolutionary building installation, use, maintenance and disposal or recycling — wood performs better than concrete and steel in terms of embodied energy, air and water pollution, carbon footprint and global warming potential.” The two-story CLT structure is part of the 54,000 square foot Phase Two building plan. Phase Two of the project will comprise both the west wing and a north wing, a steel-framed structure with mezzanines above the second floor. The two new wings will house classrooms and studio space, a lecture theatre, lounges and office areas, creating an inner courtyard and a public walkway. The new structures of Phase Two Photos supplied by Sarah Hicks will connect with the re-furbished historic buildings on the site: The old CPR freight shed and the CP telegraph building. The buildings have been home to office, classroom and studio space since the School of Architecture opened in September 2013. “The assembly of the nine-metre tall CLT panels creates an impressive profile for Laurentian Architecture,” Terrance Galvin, founding director of the School of Architecture, said in a release. “The CLT structure is innovative, beautiful and sustainable and reflects the school’s focus on northern design.” 8 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015

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    AD{TS4133104} AD{TS4151598} NEW BUSINESSES Greater Sudbury offers incentives to help new stores SARAH LASHBROOK For The Sudbury Star New business is booming in the City of Greater Sudbury, and it isn’t just large box stores moving in. In fact, there have been more than 40 new small to medium businesses that have opened up in 2015, alone. With these many successful startup and expansion businesses, such as new retail stores Stitch & Stone and Refined Consignment Boutique, as well as beauty stores like Bombshell Beauty Salon, Greater Sudbury is seeing a big change all over. “There isn’t an influx of one industry,” says Stacey Kerr, small business consultant for the Regional Business Centre. “We are seeing growth all over the board.” With this growth also comes a lot of diversity in types of business: From retail, to photography, the arts, restaurants and sport and fitness shops. Greater Sudbury seems to be getting it all. Latitude 46 Publishing opened its doors recently, as a publishing house for the north. Business As Usual offers office spaces and board rooms for entrepreneurs, who don’t have an office of their own to conduct business. Open for business Seniors North opened this year, which provides seniors with physical and emotional support, as they transition from one home to another. There is good reason for these businesses to want to open up here in Greater Sudbury. There are incentives in place to help them get the right start. One program is called the Starter Company. “This is a new program that we launched last year, through the province of Ontario. It is an incentive program with regards to training and mentoring,” says Judy Benvenuti, co-ordinator of the Regional Business Centre. Continued on page 14 Madeleine Sauve, of Seniors North, helps seniors move from their home to an apartment, retirement home or long-term care facility. JOHN LAPPA The Sudbury Star WHEN YOU CHOOSE THE UNIVERSITY OF SUDBURY... YOU DISCOVER YOUR PASSION ÉTUDES JOURNALISTIQUES | FOLKLORE ET ETHNOLOGIE INDIGENOUS STUDIES | PHILOSOPHY | RELIGIOUS STUDIES CUSTOM KITCHEN CABINETS BATHROOM VANITIES CUSTOM BUILT BARS ENTERTAINMENT CENTRES DESIGN CONSULTATIONS DIY PACKAGES HEY EVERYONE! DON’S CABINETS NOW OFFERS FINANCING UP TO $25,000 OAC* *SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. Val Caron, Ontario t. 705-897-0009 www.donscabinets.ca Focus on Sudbury 2015 Shaping your future 705-673-5661 www.usudbury.ca Member of the Laurentian Federation Friday, September 18, 2015 | THE SUDBURY STAR Focus on Sudbury 2015 Friday, September 18, 2015 | THE SUDBURY STAR 9 9

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    Revolutionary system would accommodate large and small groups JENNY LAMOTHE For The Sudbury Star Greater Sudbury is known as the hub of northern Ontario; a central location providing all the luxuries of “big-city” living, with the beauty and small-town community atmosphere, which is beloved by those who live here. It is home to the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Health Sciences North and the Cancer Treatment Centre; it’s the education capital of northern Ontario and has a world-renowned reputation as a mining centre. Yet, if you want to host a larger conference or show, you might just bypass Greater Sudbury all together. There just isn’t space. With the Greater Sudbury Synergy Project, as it is laid out by its proponents, that will no longer be an issue. About three years ago, John Finlay, former economic development officer for the City of Greater Sudbury, was presented with an idea in a presentation from John Caruso and Carmen Simmons of the Sudbury Community Foundation. A revolutionary system that would solve the problem that other projects had faced. There have been five proposals for new centres in Greater Sudbury since 1974. The difference is, every one of those was for a single use centre — either just for arts and culture events, or just for conferences. As Finlay puts it, “If you built a conference centre, it might only be filled half the time, and if you built a performing arts centre, it might only be filled half the time.” A multi-use facility could be the best approach: Aiming to cover both groups at once, in addition to local charity events and meetings, office space for local artists, and a transitional space for any future needs. Using a system created by Quebec company Gala Systems, users could 10 THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015 10 GREATER SUDBURY SYNERGY PROJECT Multi-use facility move walls, seats and floors to any configuration in a matter of minutes. Smaller groups, artists and musicians, looking to have an atmospheric event can be accommodated, and conferences can hold up to 1,200 with full catering capability, then transition to seating 1,435 people in no time at all. The technology has been used routinely in many parts of the world. A much larger space than the proposed was constructed in Lausanne Switzerland, a model of flexibility in its hosing of events, and there are smaller uses of the technology in Jonquiere, Que. (396 seats) and in Richmond, B.C. (954 seats). The provincial and federal governments have not only funded (through grants) the feasibility A transitional space for any future needs study, but have expressed great interest in the project — if the city is fully on board. While the project would require up-front government investment — $15 million from each level (federal, provincial and municipal), as well as additional funds from private investment and community partners — it would not require an annual subsidy, as all the previous single-use facilities would have required. In addition to the increase revenues, the project could bring to other markets in the city, studies by the group have shown that while the capital investment would not be repaid, the centre would break-even in its first year, not requiring further government funding. Conceptual pictures from Greater Sudbury Synergy Project THE SUDBURY STAR | Friday, September 18, 2015 Focus on Sudbury 2015

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