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ok kids Fall 2008 The Children's Hosptial
Magazines | Health 2008-12-04 11:56:03
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    ?Fall 2008 www.oumedicine.com/childrens treating kids like kids reducing fears in the emergency department ou children?s physicians 2 4 6

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    2 ok kids Did you know that The Children?s Hospital at OU Medical Center is part of the largest collaboration of health care specialists in Oklahoma? In recent weeks, you may have seen new television commercials, billboards and newspaper ads that feature ?OU Medicine.? The Children?s Hospital is part of OU Medicine, which is a new name for the relationship between the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, OU Physicians, OU Children?s Physicians, OU Medical Center and, of course, The Children?s Hospital. treating kids OU Medicine is about collaboration and pushing the boundaries to create and provide better health care. We bring together doctors, nurses, researchers, specialized technologists, students and residents to solve medical challenges. We don?t believe in conventional thinking or limits when it comes to medicine. We go above and beyond to provide the best care for our patients. It is our academic environment and our persistence in finding the answers to tough problems that gives us an extra edge, and gives our patients an added measure of hope for a successful recovery. At OU Medicine, we call this relentless caring, pushing the boundaries, collaborating, researching and the striving to improve the lives of all people ?Another Level of Medicine.? We are currently providing Another Level of Medicine to the children of Oklahoma in the following ways: ? We have the only comprehensive Children?s Hospital in Oklahoma ? with specialized equipment, doctors and medical personnel dedicated to treating kids. ? We have one of only 13 programs in the nation pioneering new treatments specific to kids with type 2 diabetes. ? We have the state?s only comprehensive pediatric cancer unit including a stem cell/ bone marrow transplant unit. ? We have the largest and highest level Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Oklahoma.

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    like kids: children?s hospital provides ?another level of medicine? ? We have the only level one trauma center in the state of Oklahoma ? for adults and kids ? which means we have the essential medical skills, staff depth and technical capability to handle even the most challenging trauma cases. ? OU Medicine has the most nationally certified pediatric nurses in Oklahoma City. ? We have the only nurses trained in inpatient and outpatient pediatric dialysis in the state. ? Oklahoma Magazine announced its 2008 list of Top Doctors in the June issue, and 42 of the 126 doctors recognized were from OU Medicine. ? OU Physicians and OU Children?s Physicians met the nation?s rigorous standards to achieve accreditation by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). ? OU Children?s Physicians Department of Urology has a nationally recognized bladder exstrophy center that provides unsurpassed expertise and patient care to children and parents coping with bladder exstrophy. ? OU Medicine?s Pediatric GI section is part of a group of specialists nationwide developing the model of best practices for accurate diagnosis and consistent, reliable care of children with inflammatory bowel disease. ? kids health! information for parents, kids and teens Do your kids have health questions about asthma or want to know how a body part works? Do they need resources for homework, or want to play fun health games? Do your teens have questions about food and nutrition or their changing bodies? Do you need help understanding your child?s emotions and behavior? All these questions and thousands more are answered in the Kids Health section of www.oumedicine.com. Just click on The Children?s Hospital and then on the Kids Health link under ?Quick Links.? Plus, it?s a great resource for your child?s school ? so, tell their teachers, too! www.oumedicine.com/childrens

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    emergency department ? reducing fears with a welcoming environment It?s often scary when kids have to make a trip to the emergency department. However, when you come to The Children?s Hospital, your little one will be seen by specially trained physicians and staff with the latest equipment and treatment methods ? all designed specifically for kids. 4 ok kids To make the emergency department a less intimidating place to visit, staff members recently volunteered their time to paint walls, hang murals and create a more kid-friendly environment. The waiting room has a large window painted to look like a fish tank. The bright colors and fish are fun for the kids to look at, and distract them during the initial wait. From floor to ceiling, they can look at the fish and imagine they are swimming off to an adventure. Feedback from families showed that the triage room was scary to children. Now painted in fun colors, it boasts pictures of Sponge Bob Squarepants and his friends. The bright walls are definite improvements over the previous dull beige. In a quiet corner, there is a fish tank full of colorful, active fish that children can sit and watch. It?s proving to have a calming effect on patients, and the staff is enjoying taking turns feeding the fish. The underwater theme carries through to the exam rooms. The privacy curtains feature seahorses bobbing along. During procedures, children can look up at the ceiling and see color and characters there, too. There are special ceiling tiles with turtles, fish and even an octo- pus. In the rooms that don?t have tiles, art students have painted scenes on ceilings. Each room will also soon have a television and DVD player, so kids can watch appropriate shows while they wait or during examinations. Russell Rooms, director of The Children?s Hospital Emergency Department, says these are not expensive changes, but they do make a big difference. ?Making the emergency department less of a scary place and giving children something to focus on other than their pain is important to families and to our employees. Patients are more at ease and cooperative when they aren?t in such a harsh environment.? The Children?s Hospital is also the only hospital in the state that has

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    a full-time child life specialist on staff for the Emergency Department. A child life specialist helps provide a less-stressful experience for patients and families in the hospital through developmentallyappropriate explanations of medical equipment, preparation prior to procedures, and assistance coping during procedures, as well as normalizing the environment through age-appropriate play opportunities. The Emergency Department also boasts new beds and a better flow that allows for faster admissions and a more efficient process for seeing patients. ? when does your child need to go to the emergency department? It?s not always obvious when to take your child to the emergency room. If they can?t breathe or are bleeding severely, it?s definitely time to go ? but what about a fever? Should you treat it at home or go to the emergency room? According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, your child needs to see a doctor if: ? He or she is younger than 2 months old and has a temperature of 100.4 or higher ? He or she is 6 months or older and has a fever higher than 101 degrees ? He or she is younger than 2 years old and has had a fever for more than 24 hours ? He or she is 2 years old or older and has had a fever for more than 72 hours All kids get fevers and, in the majority of cases, most are completely back to normal within a few days. For older infants and children, the way they act is far more important than the reading on your thermometer. Everyone gets cranky when they have a fever. This is normal and should be expected. If they are lethargic, can?t stop crying, can?t hold in food or liquids, or show signs of dehydration, you should contact your doctor. If a trip to the doctor isn?t necessary, here are a few tips to keep your child comfortable until the fever breaks: ? If your baby is at least 6 months old, give acetaminophen or ibuprofen in approved doses to bring the fever down. You should not give your baby aspirin. ? Make sure to give plenty of fluids, including water, diluted juice or children?s drinks with electrolytes. ? Keep the room cool and keep your baby dressed in light clothing. ? Do not sponge your baby in cold water or add alcohol to water. If you?re ever in doubt about what to do or what a fever might mean, or if your child is acting ill in a way that concerns you even if there?s no fever, always call your doctor for advice. www.oumedicine.com/childrens

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    the children?s hospital health alliance Formed in 2006, the Children?s Hospital Health Alliance (CHHA) was created to improve the health, wellness and safety of the children of Oklahoma. To learn more about how you can help the CHHA organizations, go to www.oumedicine.com and click on The Children?s Hospital. CHHA members include Ally?s House, Camp Cavett, Children?s Hospital Volunteers, Children?s Medical Research Institute, Oklahoma Children?s Cancer Association, OU Children?s Physicians, Child Life ? Aikman?s EndZone, Ronald McDonald House, Safe Kids and The Children?s Hospital at OU MEDICAL CENTER. 6 ok kids ou children?s physicians: oklahoma?s largest group of children?s health specialists Children are more than just tiny adults and, in many cases, childhood illnesses are quite different than adult conditions of the same names. That?s why it?s so important for parents to be able to find a specialist with a depth of expertise specific to their child?s health care needs. OU Children?s Physicians has more than 150 doctors in almost every child specialty. The majority of these doctors are board certified in child specialties and many of them offer child-specific services that are unavailable elsewhere in Oklahoma. Some have even pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. Thirteen OU Children?s Physicians hold Children?s Medical Research Institute (CMRI) Endowed Chairs. Through endowed programs, CMRI helps fund the research and education efforts of leading pediatric doctors at the OU Health Sciences Center. OU Children?s Physicians specialists care for everyday conditions as well as for ongoing or complex health conditions. These specialists include: ? Seven pediatric cardiologists (more than any other practice in the state) ? The state?s only comprehensive pediatric care for types 1 and 2 diabetes ? The state?s only pediatric stem cell transplantation team ? The state?s only comprehensive bleeding disorders program ? The state?s only team caring for children who have kidney transplants ? The only pediatric surgeons in south and central Oklahoma ? The only two pediatric neurosurgeons in Oklahoma City ? Board-certified, fellowship-trained pediatric urologists, one of whom pioneered urological tissue engineering to create functional bladders For more information on OU Children?s Physicians, go to www.oumedicine.com and click on OU Physicians. For an appointment, call 405-271-2222. ?

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    how to make an autumn leaf greeting card You can celebrate fall holidays, birthdays and other occasions by making your own autumn leaf print greeting cards. It?s easy! And there is more than one way to do it. Here?s one approach: Start with two pieces of blank, lightcolored 8-by-11 paper. On one of them, place a leaf you?ve picked, with the vein side of the leaf up. (If your leaf is very dry, you may want to spray it with a clear, nontoxic spray adhesive to keep it in one piece while you work. Let the glue dry before you start.) Now place the other piece of paper over the leaf, and use colored pencils or crayons to gently rub the paper on top of the leaf so the shape of the leaf shows up on the outside of the top sheet. Keep your leaf image on half of the top sheet. You can make your leaf rubbing with one large leaf, or use several smaller ones. Try using the traditional fall colors of red, orange and yellow, or whatever colors you want. When you?re done, fold the sheet in half to make your greeting card, and write whatever you want on the inside. Another approach is to take your leaves and put paint on them, and then use them to make leaf prints. You can use card stock or construction paper for this method. After you?ve smeared a leaf with paint, put it paint side down on one half of the card stock or construction paper and press down to make your leaf image. You may need to experiment a little to figure out how much paint to use. You can put more than one color on the same leaf if you want. Try using a variety of different types and sizes of leaves. When you?re done, fold the card stock or paper in half to form your greeting card, and write your message on the inside. ? recipe for health: chicken enchilada casserole ingredients thick and chunky salsa 1 cups, divided corn tortillas 4 (6-inch) diced onion ? cup black beans 1 can (15 ounces), drained and rinsed chicken 1 cup, cooked and chopped sour cream 1 cup, low fat colby-monterey jack cheese 1 cup 1. 2. . 4. . 6. . Lots of layers for more flavor! Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour cup salsa in bottom of 9-by-9-inch square baking dish that has been lightly coated with cooking spray. Cut or tear tortillas in half and use four pieces to cover bottom of dish. In a medium mixing bowl, combine 1 cup salsa, onion, beans and chicken. Spoon half of chicken mixture over tortillas. Top with half the sour cream, then half the cheese. Continue layering with remaining tortilla halves, chicken mixture, sour cream and cheese. Cover with foil and bake 35 minutes until bubbly. Uncover and bake five to 10 minutes longer until cheese is melted. Source: Kansas State Research and Extension Family Nutrition Program. Children should always have adult assistance when preparing food in the kitchen. Serves: 6-8 Each serving provides: Calories . . . . . . . . . 260 Total Fat . . . . . . . . 8 g Saturated Fat . . . . . 5 g Cholesterol . . . . 40 mg Sodium . . . . . 940 mg www.oumedicine.com/childrens

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    ok kids is published by The Children?s Hospital at OU MEDICAL CENTER. The information is intended to educate the public about subjects pertinent to their health, not as a substitute for consultation with a personal physician. 2008 Printed in the U.S.A. Dennis Gimmel Director of Marketing Sara Bonner Editor www.oumedicine.com/childrens HCA Health Services of Oklahoma (d.b.a. OU MEDICAL CENTER) is not part of, nor operated by, the University of Oklahoma. 6110M what?s bugging you this fall? Every autumn, it?s the same old story. The leaves change colors, the temperature drops ? and you and your children get a stuffy nose and a massive case of the sneezes. Cold, flu and allergies are all common in the fall. Telling them apart is tough. But doing so can help you feel better faster. The Common Cold: Many Causes Together, Americans suffer 1 billion colds each year. Most strike between late August and early April. That?s when people spend time in school and indoors, close to others who may be infected. You might be the latest victim if you have: ? A stuffy, runny nose ? Sneezing ? A sore throat ? A hacking cough Cold symptoms can be caused by one of more than 200 different viruses ? that?s part of why there is no cure. However, many treatments are available. Try gargling with warm salt water to relieve a sore throat. An antihistamine can help a runny nose, while a decongestant can help clear a stuffy one. For a cough, ask your pharmacist to help you choose an over-the-counter antitussive medication. Be sure to consult your doctor before giving any cold medications to children. about the children?s hospital The Children?s Hospital at OU MEDICAL CENTER has been a resource to families in the state and region for almost 80 years. We provide comprehensive care to patients from birth to age 21. Working within our walls are physician specialists and subspecialists who are nationally recruited experts and are performing the latest research on pediatric treatments and diagnoses. The Children?s Hospital at OU MEDICAL CENTER Postmaster: Please deliver between October 27?31. 1200 Everett Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73104 Call your doctor if your child?s symptoms last more than two weeks or you have severe pain in your sinuses, the areas behind your nose and eyes. You may have a sinus or ear infection requiring antibiotics. The Flu: One Virus, Many Symptoms The influenza virus spreads when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Flu signs include: ? Fatigue and weakness ? High fever ? Severe aches and pains ? Headache ? Cough Beat the flu with lots of rest, plenty of fluids, and pain relievers to soothe body aches. Get medical help if you are 65 or older, have a chronic medical condition, or are pregnant. Antiviral drugs can prevent pneumonia and other flu complications. Getting a flu shot in October or November can help you stop the flu before it starts. Anyone older than 6 months can get vaccinated, but it?s especially recommended for those who are 50 and older, younger than 5, pregnant or living with a chronic disease or in a nursing home. The Children?s Hospital provides many services otherwise not available in Oklahoma or the region: ? The state?s only pediatric stem cell transplant unit for advanced cancer treatment, with suites that house our patients? parents ? Oklahoma?s highest ranked Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), with capacity for 88 premature or ill infants PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID The Children?s Hospital at OU MEDICAL CENTER Allergies: Something in the Air Fall allergies are usually a reaction to pollen from ragweed. This powdery substance hangs in the air from late August until the first frost. ? ? ? ? ? It can cause: Itchy or watery eyes Stuffy, runny nose Cough Sneezing Sleep problems If your child suffers from allergies, you can reduce their exposure by having them shower after going outside and keeping home and car windows closed. Medications, including over-the-counter antihistamines and prescription nasal steroids, also can help. Ask your doctor what?s right for your child. If drugs don?t work, your child?s allergies interfere with their daily life, or they have another condition such as asthma, call your doctor. She might recommend a treatment like allergy shots. ? ? A Newborn Village for parents to ?room in? and learn care-giving skills, when baby is ready to transition home from the NICU ? The state?s largest pediatric sleep disorder center ? Comprehensive kidney transplant program with the state?s only pediatric dialysis unit ? Advanced cardiac and neurosurgery services

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