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Harvest 2015
Newspapers | Agriculture / Economics / Farms, Farming / Industry / How-to / Culture / Community / Lifestyle / Advertisement / Environment & Ecology 2015-08-24 08:51:48
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    Feeding the World THarvest 2015 S

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    AD{CS5734498} AD{CS5744959} A2 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 WHEN THE SUN RISES UNTIL THE DUST SETTLES... We’ll be here. Just like we’ve always been. Pineland Co-op Ag Team Nipawin - 306-862-4595 Choiceland - 306-428-2175 www.pinelandcoop.com Stay safe on ATVs this season ATVs have become popular for work and recreation on many farms and ranches. Unfortunately, reported cases of serious injury and death have increased along with their increased use. ATV accidents lead to over 130,000 emergency room visits and 600 fatalities each year. Most of these injuries and deaths can be attributed to improper use of ATVs. Make ATV safety a priority on your farm or ranch. Here are some safety tips from the National Safety Council’s Agricultural Division: #1 An ATV is not a toy. Children should not be permitted to operate ATVs without specialized training and then they should be allowed to only operate an ATV of an appropriate size. #2 ATVs with an engine size of 70cc to 90cc should be operated by people at least 13 years of age. #3 ATVs with an engine size of greater than 90cc should only be operated by people at least 16 years of age #4 Wear appropriate riding gear: DOT-, Snell ANSIapproved helmet, goggles, gloves, over-the-ankle boots, long-sleeve shirt and long pants. #5 Read owners manuals carefully. #6 ATVs are not made for multiple riders. Never carry anyone else on the ATV. #7 Any added attachments affect the stability, operating and braking of the ATV. Just because an attachment is available doesn’t mean that it can be used without increasing your risk of being injured. #8 Do not operate the ATV on streets, highways or paved roads. INSPECTION #1 Are tires and wheels in good condition? #2 Are controls and cable operational? #3 Does the chain have proper slack and is it lubricated? Is there a chain guard? #4 Is riding gear (including a helmet) available and worn? DWAYNE ENTERPRISES LTD. • HOPPER BOTTOMS • DE BIN PACKAGES Up to 20,000 bushels • ROCKET AERATION • AERATION FANS • BIN ANCHORS TWIN 2000 GALLON WAGONS. • 10X6” FRAME WHICH IS THE BIGGEST ON THE MARKET. • DUAL REAR WHEELS ARE STANDARD. • 2000 TO 5000 GALLON UNITS AVAILABLE. • 5000 GALLON LIQUID CADDYS COMING SOON. WE CAN SUPPLY THE TANKS AND PLUMBING AS WELL IF NEEDED. www.dwayneenterprises.ca • Phone: 306-752-4445 • Fax: 306-752-5574 e-mail: dwayneent@live.com • Beatty, Saskatchewan

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    AD{CS5735297} FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 A3 Protecting your farm from hazards (NC) Farming is a fickle business. The long hours and hard work that farmers spend getting their crops in and keeping their livestock healthy doesn’t guarantee success. That’s because there are so many variable risk factors that can impact farm operations. Keeping track of all the risks can be overwhelming. Reevaluating a farm’s risks at least once a year is the best way to determine and develop a plan to protect against them. Here are a few key areas to consider: Extreme weather. There is no question that extreme weather events like drought, flooding, wildfires and hail can wreak havoc on a farm. “Having a plan in place to deal with severe weather is a necessity for farms of all types and sizes,” says insurance expert Bart Robinson. “Having safe and reliable storage for produce and chemicals are just two examples of what can go into a farm insurance plan. Crop insurance is also important to consider because it protects farmers from the costs associated with damage to crops from events such as hail, which are often unavoidable.” Equipment considerations. Farm equipment is a necessity on all farms. If these critical assets get damaged, a farmer’s operation can grind to a halt. Taking the time to inspect equipment, conduct repairs, update equipment lists and evaluate insurance needs annually can help farmers avoid costly claims or gaps in coverage, says Robinson. He stresses the importance of loss-ofuse coverage on farm equipment. This covers expenses incurred for the rental of replacement mobile farm equipment that has become inoperable because of loss or damage by an insured peril such as fire or theft, which helps minimize costly downtime. Overall liability. Risks often extend beyond the farm. Many farmers provide services or consultation to others, which means additional liability considerations. Field chemical spraying or seed cleaning are two common services that farmers could provide, says Robinson, and any person doing so should have insurance in place that protects them from damages to another person or property. The same goes for environmental leaks or fires that can spread from one farm to another. With so much to think about in terms of risk on the farm, Robinson suggests speaking to an insurance broker who specializes in farm insurance. A broker will visit the farm to identify risks and customize a plan that provides the right coverage for their operation based on the farmer’s unique situation. Paragon Ag 4x6.25 Total Line of Desiccation Products NH 3 &Dry Fertilizer Services TopLine of Canola Seed Varieties Professional Field Scouting State of the Art Custom Application Complete Herbicide &Fungicide Needs “Together We Can Set the P.A.C.E.” MELFORT 752-3343 MELFORT 752-3343 Three Locations to serve you better BROOKSBY 863-4448 BROOKSBY 863-4448 KINISTINO 887-1000

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    AD{CS5734526} AD{CS5734529} AD{CS5752542} A4 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 Canadian Foodgrains Bank launching new conservation program On behalf of the Council of the RM of Moose Range 486, we would like to wish our farmers a safe and prosperous Harvest. (306) 768-2212 Carrot River, Sk. Canadian Foodgrains Bank will scale up its work in conservation agriculture in three east African countries through a new five-year $18.67 million program. The program, called the Scaling- Up of Conservation Agriculture in East Africa program, was launched August 5 at Artell Farms in Niverville, Man. It has been made possible by a $14 million grant from the Government of Canada through Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada. Through the new program, three of the Foodgrains Bank’s member agencies—Mennonite Central Committee Canada, World Renew and World Relief Canada—will be able to directly assist 50,000 farm families in Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania. Farmers who want to increase the productivity of their farms through conservation agriculture will receive training, technical assistance and support through the program. “Working together with the Foodgrains Bank members and partners on the ground, we will be able to help small-scale farmers address issues such as soil fertility and climate change and grow more food to feed their families,” says Foodgrains Bank International Programs Director Barbara Macdonald. “This program will allow us to scale-up our work to enhance soil and water conservation through improved agricultural technologies in Ethiopia and Kenya, where we work with six local partners,” adds Don Peters, Executive Director of Mennonite Central Committee Canada. “We’ve seen very positive results in our work to date, and are confident that through the funding of this program we will see these same positive results throughout a much larger area, impacting a larger number of small-scale producers and their families.” Conservation agriculture is characterized by the three linked principles of minimizing soil disturbance, permanently covering the soil, and including crop rotations and associations. It has proven effective at restoring soil health and fertility, improving the capture and use of rainfall, and increasing crop yields and farm profitability. In addition to directly assisting farmers through training, the program will also help farmer groups, non-governmental organizations, government and the private sector to promote conservation agriculture systems for smallholder farmers more broadly in East Africa, and work to improve the quality and implementation of national and regional agricultural policies and programs supporting conservation agriculture. Funding from the Canadian Government is being made available on a 3:1 matching basis; people who would like to donate can do so by visiting the Foodgrains Bank website and clicking on the Donate Now button and selecting the Conservation Agriculture in East Africa project. Canadian Foodgrains Bank is a partnership of 15 churches and church agencies working together to end global hunger. In the 2014- 15 budget year, the Foodgrains Bank provided $41.6 million of assistance for 1.1 million people in 39 countries. Canadian Foodgrains Bank projects are undertaken with matching support from the Government of Canada. Assistance from the Foodgrains Bank is provided through its member agencies, working with their local partners in the developing world. For more information, visit www. foodgrainsbank.ca. A & K Enns Trucking #1 Metal Roofing & Siding Summer Savings! Tough Rib Galvalume @ 73¢ sq.ft. In stock Lengths Only Call While Supplies Last! Melfort, SK 306-752-5035 Super B Grain Trailers • 53’ Dry Vans Ferlizer and Grain Hauling for Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Alberta, and Brish Columbia Carrot River, SK 306-768-2500 CALL OUR TOLL-FREE TOLLFREE NUMBER FOR YOUR QUOTE TODAY! 1-800-667-0750 18006670750 We are one of the Largest Metal Suppliers of #1 Metal Roofing and Siding in the North East! We offer 40 year warranty, the best in the industry! Don’t be fooled by the competition! Call today and talk to one of our Metal Experts Melfort, SK Located 1 km West of Hwy Junction 3, 6, & 41 Phone: 1-306-752-4219

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    AD{CS5729958} AD{CS5749566} Be on the lookout for slow moving vehicles With Harvest season fast approaching, Canadian farmers will be working long hours in the fields harvesting their crops. This means there will be slow-moving farm machinery on roadways, which can create a hazard for both farm equipment operators and motorists. “During this time of year, motorists and farm equipment operators often find themselves sharing the road,” says Glen Blahey, Health and Safety Specialist with the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association. “The key to road safety is mutual respect between motorists and farm equipment operators. Motorists need to pay special attention to the larger and slower farm machinery, and farm equipment operators need to respect motorists’ rights to quick and safe travel.” “While slow-moving machinery does create some additional obstacles on the roadway this time of year, the same safety rules apply,” said Inspector Joanne Keeping, Officer in Charge of Traffic Services. “Slow down, drive sober, be alert, buckle up.” The most common circumstances of a collision involving farm equipment are left-turn collisions, rear-end collisions and passing collisions. Left turns can be particularly hazardous because often, motorists think the equipment operator is pulling over to allow the vehicle to pass, but the operator is actually making a wide left turn. The Canadian Agricultural Safety Association and the RCMP have some tips to help keep everyone safe on the road: Slow down! The roadways are busy this summer. Be aware of slowmoving vehicles when travelling in agricultural areas. Farm machinery moves significantly slower than NORTH EAST PRAIRIE GRAIN other traffic. The typical speed of a piece of farm machinery is approximately 30-40 kilometres an hour. If motorists slow down, they will have time to react. Watch for the slow-moving vehicle sign. It is a bright orange triangle with a red border. The sign is to be mounted at the centre or to the left of centre on all slow-moving farm vehicles and equipment. If you see the sign, be aware the vehicle will be moving at a slow rate of speed and adjust your actions accordingly. At night, farm equipment is brightly lit with both flashing and driving lights. This is an indication for motorists to slow down and exercise caution. Farm machinery is large and operators may not be able to see vehicles immediately behind them. Motorists need to be aware that they might not be visible to the farm equipment operator and should maintain proper distances. Farm machinery operators are to stay on the roadway when possible. For extra-wide machinery, sometimes the operators have to use the shoulder of the road to not impede oncoming traffic. Motorists should be aware that farm machinery operators may have to make sudden stops or take evasive action to avoid hazards on the shoulder Both farm machinery operators and motorists need to be aware at intersections, especially on rural roadways where farm equipment may be turning from or onto approaches and farm lanes Above all, motorists and farm equipment operators need to respect each other and the rules of the road. If everyone works together, we can all get home safely. Feed Grain & Soybean Merchant. Commodities & Freight Brokerage Consulting Office: 306-873-3551 Cell: 306-873-0481 Fax: 306-873-3558 Email: neprairiegrain@gmail.com Website: neprairiegrain.com Stay Connected - View NEPG weekly Sask. Market Report At neprairiegrain.com “In Business to Serve Western Producers” GRAIN BAGS CANADA WAS $ 22,995 Harvest Specials E9300 With Easy Lift FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 Plastar Grain Bags 9 x 200 and Up! The Best Bag on the Market! 9.5 mm Thick Call for pricing! NOW $ 20,695 WAS $ 47,500 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 A5 Best Design On The Market EXG 300 Bagger with Easy Lift, Hydraulic tray option. WAS $ 36,900 Box 3129, Humboldt, SK S0K 2A0 Phone: (306) 682-5888 • Fax: (306) 682-5892 www.grainbagscanada.com NOW $ 42,750 NOW $ 33,500

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    AD{CS5737837} AD{CS5758018} AD{CS5727455} A6 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 You don’t have time for a bottleneck at harvest. High capacity GRAINMAXX TELESCOPIC SWING AUGERS make fast and easy work of hydraulically positioning the hopper beneath the semi trailer. Never climb under the trailer to wrestle the swing hopper into position again! 8 Models To Choose From New 6000 Series Telescopic Swing Away see video on website info@grainmaxx.com www.grainmaxx.com Visit us for all of your maintenance and repairs, including; Engine Diagnostic & Repair Parts Sales SGI Safety Inspections A/C Service & Repair Wheel Alignments Transmission, Differential, and Clutch Repair/Installation Also, check out our Full Service Wash Bay Hours Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Call 306-752-0200 to book an appointment or stop by to check on availability! Located at 725 Hamilton Avenue, Meltort To P.A. Sask Dr. Flett Springs St. Hamilton Ave.

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    AD{CS5751786} FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 A7 No matter what the crop — canola, alfalfa, grass, small grains, lentils, or peas — New Holland H8000 Series Speedrower ® windrowers deliver capacity that can’t be matched by any other machine. Not only do you have the power to drive the widest variety of headers, you also get outstanding visibility, comfort, and header control – giving you a SMART choice in the ultimate crop-cutting machine. PHENOMENAL CAPACITY CAPACITY AND IN-FIELD CONTROL. ® ® SWATHER SALE! $ 145,000 2013 MACDON M155 #W22649A. 497 HRS, 40’ TRIPLE DELIVERY DRAPER, 16.5L-16.1 TAIL WHEELS, 600-65R28 DRIVE WHEELS, HYD CENTER LINK, ROTO SHEARS,HYDRAULIC ROLLER. PRINCE ALBERT. $ 125,000 2012 NEW HOLLAND H8060 #HW3388A. 508 HRS, AIR SPRING SUSPEN- SION, FULL CAB W/AC, EZEE PILOT GUIDANCE, 36’ HEADER, DOUBLE KNIFE, SINGLE UII REEL. HUMBOLDT $ 125,000 2012 NEW HOLLAND H8060 #HW3387A. 551 HRS, AIR SPRING SUSPENSION, FULL CAB W/AC, CAB DELUXE UPGRADE, 36’ HEADER, DOUBLE KNIFE, SINGLE SWATH PU REEL, TRANS- PORT GAUGE WHEEL PACKAGE. HUMBOLDT $ 26,500 1998 CASE IH 8825 #W22108B. 2906 HRS, 30’ SHIFTABLE DRAPER HEADER, GAUGE WHEELS, ROTO SHEARS, KOENDERS MOUNTED ROLLER, DOUBLE KNIFE,DOUBLE SWATH PU REEL. HUMBOLDT 2005 NEW HOLLAND HW325 #HN3123B. 1500 HRS, DELUXE CAB UPGRADE, CAB AND REAR AXLE SUSPENSION, HB36 HEADER, GAUGE $ WHEELS, SINGLE KNIFE DRIVE, UII PICKUP REEL. 72,500 $ HUMBOLDT 89,000 2011 MASSEY FERGUSON 9430 #W22122B. 844 HRS, 30’ CENTRE DELIVER DRAPER HEADER, WIND- SHIELD WIPER, ELECTRIC FORE/ AFT, MECH TILT, UII P/U REEL, HYD DECK SHIFT, CONVERTED TO SCHUMACHER KNIVES, TOPCON STEERING MOTOR, AUTOSTEER, GAUGE WHEELS, REAR WEIGHTS. KINISTINO. $ 105,000 2012 JOHN DEERE A400 #W22412A. 256 HRS, 480XR38 TIRES AG LUG, 14LX16.1SL FORMED REAR CASTOR, REAR WEIGHT KIT, CUTTING HOURS --ONLY! 185 HRS, 36’ DOUBLE KNIFE DRIVE, UII P/U REEL, SINGLE SPAN, PLASTIC FINGERS, HYD TILT, FORE/AFT, TRANSPORT KIT. KINISTINO. 2007 MASSEY FERGUSON 9430 #W22408A . 1102 HRS, 30’ CENTRE DELIVER DRAPER HEADER, UII P/U REEL, HYD TILT AND GAUGE WHEELS, 18.4R26 $ DRIVE TIRES, 12.5L-15 FORMED CASTORS. 72,000 $ 58,000 KINISTINO. 2002 MACDON 9250 #W22416A. 1101 HRS, 30’ DRAPER HEADER, 21.5X16.1 AG LUG, 9.5 FORKED BACK CASTOR, 30’ 962 HEADER, MECH DECK SHIFT, SINGLE KNIFE DRIVE. KINISTINO. 2006 MASSEY FERGUSON 9420 #PN3020C . 828 HRS, 30’ CENTRE DELIVER DRAPER HEADER, FRONT 18.4R26 FIRESTONE, 30’ PU REEL UII, ELECTRIC FORE/AFT, SWIVEL GAUGE WHEELS, HYD 2011 MACDON M150 #W22643A. 570 HRS, 2010 D60 HEADER - ONLY 407 HRS, HYD SHIFT DECK, ALWAYS SHEDDED. KINISTINO $ TILT, TIRES,MOUNTED SINGLE KNIFE, WINCH FORKED SWATH REAR 62,000 ROLLER, 4 CYLINDER CUMMINS $ DIESEL 110 HP. PRINCE ALBERT. 136,000 $ 92,000 2011 MASSEY FERGUSON 9435 #W22406A. 270 HRS, 36’ CENTRE DELIVERY DRAPER HEADER, WINCH ROLLER FREE FORM, 480/85R28 FRONT TIRES, REAR FORKED 14L-16.1 SL GOODYEAR, SINGLE KNIFE 36’, 4 REAR WEIGHTS 55KG EACH, GAUGE WHEELS 20X10.00-10NHS, 5 FOR- WARD LIGHTS 3 REAR LIGHTS, 5200 HEADER. PRINCE ALBERT. Hwy. #3, Kinistino 306-864-3667 Hwy. #5, Humboldt 306-682-9920 Hwy. #2 S., Prince Albert 306-922-2525 F TAFF VISIT FARMWORLD.CA FOR DAILY CASH SPECIALS ON EQUIPMENT,PARTS & MORE! Bi-annual payment $ 12,310 (OAC, some restrictions apply) 2015 MACDON M155 WITH D65 35’ HEADER + GST

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    AD{CS5738316} AD{CS5752515} AD{CS5734514} AD{CS5734531} A8 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 We make it look and run like new! Do you have abandoned water wells on your property? Did you know that you may be eligible for 90% rebated funding to decommission those abandoned wells? Abandoned wells, or groundwater wells that are no longer in use, pose a risk to our safety, environment and groundwater aquifers. The Carrot River Valley Watershed Association, through the Agri-Environmental Group Plan (AEGP), provides producer level support for the Farm Stewardship and Farm & Ranch Water Infrastructure Programs. As one of 14 AEGPs in the province, we assist producers and Rural Municipalities with applications to these programs; access to technical support; education and awareness opportunities; and environmental stewardship. Contact our AEGP Technician at 306-920-8166 or crwatershedaegp@gmail.com for details. Carrot River Valley Watershed Association Inc. 306-752-1270 or 306-920-8166 crwatershed.ca 202 Main Street, Melfort, SK Dedicated to protecting and preserving the Carrot River Watershed through education and awareness. SUMMER PARTS SPECIALS We offer complete electronic diagnostics on all Heavy trucks. • Agriculture & Industrial Repairs • Engines & Power Trains • Air Conditioning • Rust Repair & Welding • Sandblasting & Painting • CNC Plasma Cutting • Metal Fabrication • Computer Assisted Design 306-768-3783 CARROT RIVER, SK ACCUMARK AERIAL SPRAYING “Leading the field in technology & workmanship” 10 % OFF * J.W. Speaker LED Lights (Various Styles) 10 % OFF * All Magna Power Batteries • Nipawin and Area’s only turbo-prop spray plane • Can do three times the application in the same amount of time as other spray planes • Turbine aircraft allow the fastest and most effective application • Call and schedule your desiccation acres now before time runs out! * All prices subject to taxes and environmental fees (if applicable). Offer expires August 31, 2015. redheadequipment.ca MELFORT | 2420 Sask Dr S, S0E 1A0 | 844.494.5844 Serving Northeast Saskatchewan Call: 306-276-6840 Email: tkarle27@hotmail.com Website: www.accumarkairspray.com

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    AD{CS5729464} AD{CS5736538} NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 A9 FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 Are aging farmers a work risk? Agriculture has always been recognized as a dangerous occupation, especially for farmers and farm workers over the age of 60. A University of Alberta researcher suggests that the risk of injury and fatalities among older farmers can be reduced if families recognize and manage key factors that contribute to farm injuries, such as chronic health problems and the use of prescription drugs to treat those health problems. DonVoaklander, a farm injury expert with the Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research in Edmonton, says farmers and farm families must work closely with health care providers to ensure that chronic health issues such as arthritis, heart problems, chronic back pain, limited mobility, impaired hearing, sleep deprivation, depression and asthma are managed properly in aging farmers. Families must also recognize that the use of prescription drugs to treat chronic health conditions may be compounding the risk of injury among older farm workers. In essence, Dr. Voaklander’s research, entitled Health, Medication Use and Agricultural Injury, suggests that injury rates and fatalities among older farmers can be reduced if farm families and health care providers do a better job of recognizing the factors thatcontribute to farm-related injuries. “Farmers and farm families need to work closely with their health care providers to ensure issues such as chronic illness and concurrent use of several medications do not add excessive risk to older farmers and that diseases and health conditions are managed in the most appropriate manner,” said Dr. Voaklander. It has been reported that prescription drugs or other medications such as sedatives, non-steroidal antiinflammatories, narcotic pain killers, anti-depressants, heart medications and drugs used to treat stomach ailments may have contributed to the farm injury in question. The researchers further determined that while significant attention is paid to disease factors that increase the risk of injury, much less work has been devoted to examining the role that medications may have played in contributing to farm injuries and fatalities. The study outlines a variety of farming activities and specific risk factors that, according to recent academic studies and statistical data, ranked agriculture among the most dangerous occupations for older workers in North America. For example, the study suggests that the operation of tractors and other farm equipment requires accurate sensory input, rapid information processing, reliable judgement and fast motor responses. As such, any deterioration of visual abilities, reflexes, reaction times, muscle strength, joint flexibility and cognitive abilities could place elderly farm workers at a greater risk of injury or death. “Farming as an occupation demands a variety of skills that come under the general label of human sensorimotor performance,” said Dr. Voaklander. “These include skills in vision, hearing, memory and vigilance, as well as the ability to make decisions while performing both complex and repetitive tasks.” “Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that the us e of certain medications is associated with the degradation of these sensorimotor skills and this may especially be true for farmers who are working in mechanized and other potentially high risk situations.” According to Dr. Voaklander, studies have shown that multiple drug use to treat a wide range of chronic and acute diseases can affect a person’s orientation and coordination. Particular combinations of medication have been linked to an increased risk of impaired balance, falls and motor vehicle collisions. Diuretics, potassium supplements and drugs that alter blood pressure and pulse rates can also affect a person’s ability to perform typical on-farm tasks, thereby increasing the risk of injury or death. The findings regarding the use of medications and the performance of farm duties are particularly significant given the demographic trends that are expected to emerge in the North American farming community during the next two decades. As a whole, the North American population is experiencing a demographic shift that will see a larger proportion of the population fall into the age range of 65 years of age or older. In Canada, the 2006 Canadian Census suggests that the proportion of people aged 65 or older will double by 2031, reaching an estimated eight million people, or 21 percent of the country’s total population. This noteworthy aging trend is also expected to affect a farming population that is already recognized as one of the oldest occupational groups in North America. In other words, as the North American farming population grows older, the number of farm injuries related to disease and disability risk factors, chronic health problems and medication use seems likely to increase. Further complicating the health risks of elderly farm workers are factors such as insufficient rehabilitation after a previous injury, a lack of rehabilitation facilities and programs in rural areas and a tendency among farmers to return to work too quickly after an injury has occurred. “Almost certainly, the most common health problem related to farm injury is prior injury,” states Dr. Voaklander. “For owner-operators, there may be a tendency to return to active farming prior to fully functional conditioning ... and preparation for the resumption of rigorous farming activity after injury or disability may be inadequate.” The health of elderly farm workers is critical to the maintenance of the agricultural base in North America and health and safety research initiatives need to recognize this, Dr. Voaklander concluded. “By integrating research from the fields of gerontology, occupational health and safety, and injury prevention, innovative interventions could be devised to assist the aging farmer in the continuation of farming.” Points to consider: • Educate health care providers. • Encourage proactive involvement of farm families. • Conduct a comprehensive review of medications. • Ensure proper recovery after an injury. • Take steps to protect hearing and avoid hearing impairment. • Get a good night’s sleep. BroadGrain Commodies Inc. Grain & Specialty Crops Handling Facility Dafoe, SK • Make modifications to minimize arthritic pain, joint mobility problems and chronic back pain. • Recognize injury risks associated with depression and stress fatigue. TwoWayRadioCommunications Farmers-Truckers -RM’s-School Div -Fire Dept Save fuel, time and wages with good radio communications. ~ Complete systems, add-ons, portables, antennas, towers ~ Tune-ups, repairs, parts ~ We have MIDLAND 4 Pin Mics Good selection of near new ICOM and VERTEX mobiles at clearance prices! Limited quantity available! 1-800-797-7234 radios@ronaldcom.ca Russell MB 204-773-3038 Yorkton SK 306-786-4200 We provide radios and service to more than 2500 farms, serving the Prairies since 1980. PREMIUM QUALITY MOBILES - $395 ANTENNAS WITH RADIOS - HALF PRICE! PREMIUM QUALITY FULL POWER PORTABLES - $295 with easy care lithium batteries and rapid chargers BroadGrain’s Food and Specialty commodies division is focused on the trading of Saskatchewan food-grade agri-products for shipment to countries throughout the world. Currently contracng 2015 Flax, Mustard, and Pulses Mustard: (306) 554-3030—Dafoe Plant—Bob or Marv Peas, Lenls, Flax, Pulses: Tony Cornacchia (306) 541-4838

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    AD{CS5734528} AD{CS5756477} AD{CS5736864} A10 NORTHEAST SUN HARVEST 2015 FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 2015 Interest rate changes hit home for agriculture industry By Alexis Stockford The recent plunge in interest rates may have been national news, but the resulting drop in both borrowing cost and investment yield has local implications. The Canadian economy showed negative growth for the first half of 2015, prompting the Bank of Canada to lower interest rates for the second time this year in an effort to jump-start the flagging economy. Two weeks ago, the nation’s top bank announced it would be dropping interest rates to 0.5 per cent from 0.75, a historic low. The five major banks quickly followed suit, dropping their prime interest rates by 15 basis points. According to Trevor Sutter of Farm Credit Canada, the lower interest is good news for farmers who must often finance new equipment. He added, however, that it is too early to tell how many more producers will be applying for credit. “I think it’s kind of a guessing LANE REALTY For the most EXPOSURE that you deserve in the marketing of your farm or ranch property - Contact your local agent: STAN HALL Strasbourg/Watrous/Humboldt (306) 725-7826 MORWENNA SUTTER Melfort/Wadena (306) 327-7129 JEFF HEGLAND Saskatoon/Prince Albert (306) 270-9050 To view full color feature sheets for all of our CURRENT LISTINGS Visit our web site at www.lanerealty.com WITH OVER 30 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS! Ph: (306) 569-3380 • Email: lanerealtycorp@sasktel.net 161 Registered Sales in 2014! www.lanerealty.com game as to when the opportunity comes about,” he said. “It all depends on the market in the local area...we do know that a lower interest rate environment does significantly help farmers.” J.P. Gervais, chief economist with the FCC, also says that the rate cut will give farmers a financial break, although he thinks the impact will mostly be through operation loans rather than the long-term investments of purchasing land. For most farmers, he said, a lower interest rate will not tip the balance on whether they decide to buy land or not. Also, although interest rates do play a part in determining land-values, farmers should not expect land-values or rental values to decrease, Gervais said. According to him, rental values in particular are “sticky” and the market would need to see prolonged low interest before rental costs follow suit. “The cost of long-term money, the fixed rates you’ll get in the market place are really low,” he said. “The spread between the cost of the short term rates, the level of the short term rates versus the long term rates, the fiveyear mortgages or the sevenyear mortgages, is really low. Yes, of course interest rates are not projected to climb any time soon. No one knows when this will happen, but it’s hard to envision interest rates moving up in the short term.” Along with lower financing costs, the lowered interest rate sent the loonie sliding to its lowest value in over 10 years, coming in at 77 cents U.S. as of July 27. While the souped-up exchange rate means foreign products are more expensive, a lower Canadian dollar value has historically made Canadian export products more competitive. “When it comes to grains and oil seeds or livestock, for that matter, I think that’s a huge plus generally speaking for producers in Western Canada,” Gervais said, adding the U.S. is expected to raise their own interest rates by the end of the year, maintaining downwards pressure on the Canadian dollar. While he stressed that he does not encourage producers to borrow if it does not fit into their business plan, Gervais also said that such a monumental move by the Bank of Canada should inspire farmers to sit down with their financial advisor. “Everybody would need to look at ‘Hey, where is my business at?’” he said. “Where am I at in terms of my strategy in the next few years? Am I in expansion mode? Scaling back?’...If I’m looking at all the loans that I have and all the debt I have on my books, is it all floating? Should I lock some in so that I protect myself, take advantage of the low interest rates right now, protect myself from future increases?” Forage And Turf Seed PICKSEED is currently buying forage seed at our Nipawin, SK processing plant. Please contact one of our representatives for further details: Kevin Hainstock 862-9819 Cell 862-7156 www.pickseed.com Clayton Myhre 862-9819 Cell 862-8398 Brian Robins 862-9819 Cell 862-1694 The City of Melfort Salutes The Northeast Agriculture Community The citizens and merchants of Melfort salute our friends and neighbours in the agricultural community – the lifeblood of rural Saskatchewan! As the major Farm Service Centre in Northeastern Saskatchewan, we thank you for your involvement in our City and invite you to use our services and amenities often! Come to Melfort to live or visit – you’ll love it here! Wishing you all a bountiful harvest, Mayor Rick Lang and Melfort City Council

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