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Books | 2008-06-26 11:41:59
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    ?FREE JUNE 26-JULY 2 2008 VOLUME 24 NUMBER 2 Shit, piss, fuck, cunt, cocksucker, motherfucker and tits!

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    EDITORIAL Editor Alastair Sutherland Music Editor Rupert Bottenberg News Editor Patrick Lejtenyi Editorial Assistant Sacha Jackson Listings Editor Vidya Lutchman Copy Editor Lorraine Carpenter Contributing Editors Marites Carino (Dance), Sasha (Sex), Mark Slutsky (Film), Juliet Waters (Books) Contributing Writers Chris Barry, Neil Boyce, Scott C, Lorraine Carpenter, Michael Citrome, Johnson Cummins, Gerard Dee, Stacey Dewolfe, Len Dobbin, Samer Elatrash, Malcolm Fraser, Lina Harper, Matthew Hays, Christopher Hazou, Matt Jones, Raf Katigbak, AJ Kinik, Janis Kirshner, Erik Leijon, Peter Lightburn, Tracey Lindeman, Erin MacLeod, Jeffrey Malecki, Anne Marie Marko, Lateef Martin, Drew Nelles, Jack Oatmon, Genevieve Paiement, Mathilde Rabbat, Christine Redfern, Scott Saxon, David Shaw, Shane Sinnott, Al South, Christopher Sykes, Alex Tigchelaar, Vincent Tinguely, Lucas Wisenthal, Narcel X, Andrea Zanin, Steve Zylbergold ART Art Director Chris Tucker Assistant Art Director Nicolas Ct Photographers and Illustrators Rachel Granofsky, Dave Rosen, Richard Suicide, Rick Trembles Flat checker Jeffrey Malecki SALES Advertising Director Louise Tellier Sales Representatives Nathalie Beaulac, Pierre-Yves Clment, David Greer, Genevive Perras, Lucie Plante, Marie-France Sguin, Christian Veillette Sales Coordinator Genevive Denis Classifieds Sales Manager Amardeep Assi Classifieds Sales Assistant Vronique Fournier Classifieds Sales Representatives Louis Clment, Patrick Wellens Promotions Genevive Perras PRODUCTION Production Manager Martin Ouimet Designers Huguette Bergevin, Pierre-Franois Bigras, Jessica Charbonneau, Celine Poupart, milie Salles, Yannick Sasseville, Jessica Zohil ADMINISTRATION Accounts Payable Mica Foti Collection Agent Joyce Rabagliati Distribution Gama 2000 Receptionists Fariba Bonakdar The Mirror is published every Thursday and is distributed throughout Montreal. 1999 readership measured at 287,000 by SOM Inc. Entire contents are Communications Gratte-Ciel Lte. The Mirror is located at 465 McGill Street, 3rd floor. Published by Communications Gratte-Ciel Lte (head office 300, Avenue Viger Est, Montral, H2X 3W4). Printed by Quebecor World Inc. (head office at 612 St-Jacques). Printed at Imprimerie Mirabel-Division of Quebecor Media, 12,800 Brault Street, St-Janvier de Mirabel, QC, J7J 1P3. National Sales Toronto DPS Media, 1240 Bay Street, #305, Toronto, ON, M5R 2A7, (416) 413-9291 National Sales Montreal Quebecor Ventes Media, 465 McGill Street, 6th floor. Montreal, QC, H2Y 4B4, (514) 597-2231 Subscription rates: first class $100/yr; U.S. subscriptions $125/yr. Canadian Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement #0229865. Change of address can be sent directly to our offices. THE MIRROR 465 McGill St., 3rd floor, Montreal, Quebec H2Y 4B4 Tel: (514) 393-1010, 393-8002 (classifieds) Fax: 393-3173/3756 General e-mail: mirror@mtl-mirror.com Community listings e-mail: listings@mtl-mirror.com Publisher Michel Desbiens www.montrealmirror.com A.A.N. ASSOCIATION OF ALTERNATIVE NEWSWEEKLIES MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 26 - JULY 2 2008 3

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    LETTERS WE Resurrecting God [Re: ?Down with God? Letters, June 19] Letter writer William Richardson misunderstands totalitarianism. Totalitarianism properly understood is something repressive. Contrary to Richardson, the church is not repressive at all but is in fact the great liberator. The church follows the Natural Law set in motion by God. Those who accept man's limitations and follow the Natural Law are on their way to freedom. Those who carelessly use their free will to reject the Natural Law which prohibits murder, stealing, contraception, homosexuality, abortion, embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia etc., become themselves willing slaves to sin? and this is the worst kind of slavery because it involves a kind of selfimposed exile. This is what the church refers to as Hell. It is not God nor the church that condemns one to hellfire but the individual himself. God in fact loves everyone and wants all men to be saved, but he gives each person a free will to accept or reject his love. 4 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 26 - JULY 2 2008 Richardson and other atheists may try to reject the Natural Law and its objective rules but it exists nonetheless. God exists. Common sense tells us that there has to be a First Cause. If there were no God and no objective laws to govern people, everything would be reduced to opinion. This would result in anarchy, not freedom as we see happening today. Contrary to Richardson, democracy does not mean the freedom to do as one pleases. Richardson is thus quite mistaken about the church, totalitarianism and democracy. Letter writer John Dirlik also confuses church teaching with the sins of men?a common mistake made by those who wish to discredit the church and religion. Nowhere, for example does the church teach or condone crusades or inquisitions. It is not religion that is responsible for wars but people who use their religion in a false way to serve their own selfish ends. So far as we can learn about the history of mankind, through excavations back into prehistory, we can see that there has always been an idea of God. INSIDE June 26?July 2 This Week THE FRONT p. 5 Downtown noise crackdown? Anti-war in Quebec?Mont- Royal's street art?Faggity-Ass Fridays returns. NEWS p. 8 The city's transport plan's friends and foes?Professional bull riding. MUSIC p. 18 Jazz Festival overview?Len Bobbin's Jazz fest highlights?A word with Public Enemy's Chuck D?That 1 Guy pipes up?The Lost Fingers poke the '80s with Gypsy jazz?Robertson's homemade soul?Down the Amazon with Chicha Libre?Definitely check out Definitely Not Jazz? Crookers get all fidgety. FILM p. 43 Ben Stein on his anti-evolution doc Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed?Carlos Reygadas's beautiful, glacial Silent Light? Comedy The Promotion is a missed opportunity?Weekly round-up?MPP on Suburban Roulette. ARTSWEEK p. 56 France, New France, Kevin Ledo's lovely ladies, NeEma. COVER p. 18 Talkin' trash-funk with Montreal's aRTIST oF tHE yEAR before their Jazz fest gig. Cover photo by Rachel Granofsky. BOOKS p. 57 Your favourite sasquatch is back with Bigfoot: I Not Dead. THEATRE p. 58 Flashback to the '60s in All Grown Up. RESTO p. 62 Top notch takeout at Ian Perreault Prts--Manger. Columns PEOPLE p. 6 60 Million Girls president Wanda Bedard. RIFF RAFF p. 12 Drugs of choice. PRESS START p. 50 Lego Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures. WWW.MONTREALMIRROR.COM SASHA p. 71 Young and restless. Every Week ROSEN p. 4 PUNKUSRAUCOUS REX p. 30 COMPACT DISCS p. 31 THE LOAD-DOWN p. 32 DISCO VOLANTE p. 34 RANT LINE? p. 35 THE INCUBATOR p. 36 VIDIOT'S BOX p. 48 SUDOKU p. 61 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY p. 63 CLASSIFIEDS p. 65 Listings LIVE MUSIC p. 37 FILM p. 52 OPEN CITY p. 61 STAGE p. 59 GALLERY p. 60 WELCOME LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Send your comments, compliments or criticisms to: Letters to the Editor, Mirror, 465 McGill St., 3rd Floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 4B4. You may also fax us at (514) 393-3173, e-mail your comments to letters@mtl-mirror.com, or visit our Web site at www.montrealmirror.com. Letters should include your name, address and daytime phone number. The Marxists had predicted the end of religion. With the end of oppression we would no longer need the medicine of God, we were told. But even they had to recognize that religion never comes to an end, because it's present in man as such. This inner sensor does not, in any case, work automatically, like some piece of technology, but is a living thing that can either develop with the person or, on the other hand, become desensitized and almost dead. Because faith in God goes beyond mere knowledge, beyond what is demonstrable, one can always turn their life away from faith and find arguments that seem to refute it. Nonetheless, even in an unbelieving person there remains somehow a vestigial question of whether there is after all something there. ?PAUL KOKOSKI, HAMILTON, ON. With regards to John Dirlik's dead-on rebuttal of Paul Kokoski's robotic championing of religion's dubious benefits to mankind (?Church and state together again?? Letters, June 12), I can only say God, I wish I'd said that! ?A. LAWRENCE HEALEY Theft is theft [Re: ?Load down,? Music, June 19] To paraphrase Shane Sinnott: ?Everyone is downloading stolen music, so it's okay to do. Damn those laws.? Hey, I like free stuff, but let's get real here, not delusional. If someone is charging for stuff, and you take one, it's theft. Yes, I dislike the archaic old-media, and they will have had their day in a decade, but for now, theft is theft is theft. Now about visionaries like Trent Reznor who play within the system, give their music away and still make a fortune. That's the way of the future. ?SCHWARTZMAN Euthanasia not the answer [Re: ?People,? News, May 29] Chris Barry's interview with SPCA worker Julie Laurin was great. I really admire people like Laurin, who try against all odds to save many pet animals from euthanasia. The problem is that too many cats and dogs are not sterilized and neutered by their owners. Pets are seen as disposable products in our throwaway society, and the SPCA often doesn't have enough financial resources or organizational skills, in many cases, to keep most of these pets alive. The SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) has in many cases a number of branches that have sadly become the SPEA (Society for the Promotion of Euthanasia of Animals). It would be better to spay or neuter unwanted pets and release them into the wild, rather than send them to the SPCA. That way, these discarded pets would have a greater chance of surviving and at the same time they would not contribute to pet overpopulation. ?MANISH PATWARI

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    THE FRONT QUOTE Crackdown on fun Attention noisy drunks and the establishments that serve them: the downtown Ville-Marie borough wants you to shut up, or else. Late last week, the borough amended its penalties for noise violations, increasing fines against both individuals and businesses responsible for any ruckus caused. For individuals, the fines can increase from $300 to $1,000 for a first infraction, from $1,000 to $3,000 for a second and from $3,000 to $10,000 for repeats. For institutions, fines jump from $1,500 to $3,000 for a first, from $3,000 to $6,000 for a second and from $6,000 to $12,000 for repeats. Ville-Marie is the first borough to boost fines in the city. They come into effect this Saturday, June 28. ?We at the borough felt that the bylaw, which is common to all boroughs, was a bit mild, and it was time to step it up,? says spokesman Jacques-Alain Lavalle. ?This is really about terrasses. As the eastern part of Ste-Catherine is pedestrianized (through the Village), we wanted to make sure the locals have some peace.? Lavalle says the rules will be enforced after midnight during the week and after 3 a.m. on weekends. ?PATRICK LEJTENYI Martial protest Thursday, July 3, Quebec City marks 400 years since explorer Samuel de Champlain stepped ashore at the abandoned Iroquoian settlement of Stadacona and founded the first permanent French colony in North America. Not everyone will be in a celebratory mood, though, as activists spearheaded by the Quebec City-based Guerre la guerre Coalition will be converging on the festivities to highlight the plight of Canada's native peoples and to protest against the war in Afghanistan. ?We think it's important to have an anti-colonial perspective put out there, especially in Quebec where these issues are pushed to the side,? says Patrick Cadorette, an organizer with Block the Empire, which is mobilizing a contingent of Montreal protesters. The main target of demonstrators will be a ceremonial march by soldiers from CFB Valcartier, recently returned from fighting in Afghanistan. ?We want to disrupt the parade as much as possible,? says Cadorette, while adding that the protests will be ?family friendly.? Buses leave July 3, at 7 a.m., from in front of Concordia's Hall Building (1455 de Maisonneuve W.). To reserve a seat or for more info, call (514) 848-7583 or visit j3.amp-montreal.net. ?CHRISTOPHER HAZOU A N G E L & I N S E C T ANGEL: George Carlin One of the original barrier-busting comics of the '60s, George Carlin was proud, ?in a perverse way,? of his American legal legacy. His ?Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television? (for the complete list, see Under the Logo on the cover) led to an appearance before the Supreme Court, which ruled them not suitable for prime (or any other) time. But besides being profane in an era that was only getting ready for it, Carlin was an early and candid drug user and an opponent of the Vietnam War and religiously imposed mores and hypocrisy. An expert at wordplay and a huge influence on generations of comics, he was also funny as fuck. INSECT: Drilling for oil Republicans, as they tend to do, are getting all gung-ho for offshore drilling?which has been frozen for 27 years, thanks in part to George W. Bush's father. But last week, the President urged Congress to lift the ban, saying high oil prices demand it. Never mind that any exploration off the coast of Florida (whose governor, Charlie Crist, supports it, and may be John McCain's running mate) won't result in any price changes before 2030, or that oil companies already hold leases on 68 million acres on and offshore they haven't drilled. The last thing Republicans need as they head to electoral defeat in November is to be painted as the Big Oil party. But they aren't doing anything to change that. OF THE WEEK: ?The number one worst cover song?Celine Dion covering AC/DC?is sacrilege.? ?Total Guitar magazine editor Stephen Lawson, on the singer's duet six years ago with the band Anastacia at a concert in Vegas. Their version of ?You Shook Me All Night Long? was branded an ?offence? against music. HOW'S YOUR HALO? Nelson Triana (right), aka G-Spot, assesses the Halo 3 talents of young gamers hoping to join his Amp Energy pro team on Sunday. Hundreds of gamers crowded into the 3,500-square foot Amp Your Game tent on St-Laurent this weekend, where 80 stations and all manner of games awaited. PHOTO BY JASON FELKER PEEPing Mont-Royal Around this time of year, Mont- Royal Avenue likes to get a little weird. Paysages phmres is the city's annual nod to the artists who disproportionately populate the area. For two months, the avenue will play host to installations and performances by nine groups of artists from around the world. ?Mont-Royal is not just a commercial street,? says guest curator Stphane Bertrand. His concept for this year is Paysages phmres/Espaces Publics (or ?PEEP show?), which he intends to be ?more mobile and ephemeral? than previous exhibits. ?We want to see how we can appropriate the space, find new ways of being in public space,? he says. One way the space will be appropriated is the ?half funeral procession, half-parade? on Wednesday, July 2. Led by performance art collective les Fermires obsdes, who will travel in a police-escorted limousine, the spectacle will deliver a coffin representing over-consumption to Place Grald-Godin, in front of Mont-Royal metro. Look out for other projects? many directly related to the neighbourhood?including sculptures made from residents' recycling boxes, a broadcast of locals' dreams on loudspeakers and a sculpture of a car made from bicycles. Info: paysagesephemeres.com. ?MATT JONES Faggity returns After a brief hiatus, Head and Hands' Faggity-Ass Fridays will be kicking back into gear this Saturday, June 28, at their new Mile- End location, the Playhouse (5656 Parc), before returning to their regular Friday night dance parties at the same location for the months of July and August. And what, exactly, is a Faggity- Ass Friday, you ask? ?It's a queer-themed fundraiser for the Sense Project, our sex education program,? says organizer Christina Foisy. ?The whole idea is to create queer-friendly spaces in neighbourhoods like Mile-End, spaces that are alternatives to the Village. We have an anti-violence policy where we want everyone to treat everyone with respect, we have gender neutral bathrooms and we provide safe sex materials at the door, everything from condoms to gloves to lube, pamphlets on everything you could possibly speak of, and, of course, information about the Sense Project. I guess you could say it's kind of a politicized space.? Rocking the joint this Saturday will be the bands Wet Nose Hero and Swamp Sex Robots, the Dead Doll Dancers, DJs Plastik Patrik, Sinik and Xavier T, with the whole deal being hosted by Montreal's fave drag queen Miss Velveeta Spandexxx. The fun starts at 10:30 p.m. Suggested donation is 10 bucks. ?CHRIS BARRY REAR-VIEW MIRROR 16 YEARS AGO - JUNE 25?JULY 2, 1992 On the cover: A BMW in front of a row of triplexes, signifying, somehow, co-ops. Funding cutbacks are threatening them, as are the increasing number of ?yuppies? moving in, says former member ?Maurice.? ?Could you imagine if everyone in your apartment building decided they didn't like you and kicked you out of your home?? he asks. ? Generally panning the big-budget summer sequel releases (Batman Returns, Lethal Weapon 3, Alien 3), Martin Siberok takes a shine only to Whoopi Goldberg's Sister Act. ? Discussing the cover art of their latest album Between 10 th and 11 th , which features a bunch of rapidly ripening bananas, Charlatans UK bassist Martin Blunt says, ?I think we offended a lot of East Germans, because there's a joke in West Germany about how East Germans have never seen a banana.? ? David Shannon accuses Pride parade organizer Normand Jolicoeur of ?fifi-fascism? after it's announced ?drag and leather queens were not welcome at this year's festivities,? due to the media's tendency to focus only on the flamboyant. ? MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 26 - JULY 2 2008 5

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    6 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 26 - JULY 2 2008 PEOPLE BY CHRIS BARRY Reading, writing, reproducing Educating women key to rising out of poverty, says development honcho Name: Wanda Bedard Age: 47 Occupation: President of 60 Million Girls Bio: Right around the turn of the new millennium, this inspired Beaconsfield broad was reading a lot of articles about the plight of Afghani women, finding herself increasingly disturbed by their situation. One morning, after reading yet another distressing news report on the condition of women in the developing world, Wanda's eldest daughter asked her what the hell she planned to do about it. ?And that was a turning point for me?reading and complaining about it wasn't going to do any good, I needed to take action.? So she did, spending the next year researching international development organizations, coming to the belief that education for girls was the way to go, and eventually volunteering her talents to help raise 100K for UNICEF's effort to build a school for chicks in West Africa. In 2006, she launched 60 Million Girls (60millionsdefilles.org) as a public foundation with the specific goal of empowering women in the developing world through education. She says that over 99 per cent of the monies the foundation receives goes directly to the projects they support, with the entire organization being volunteer-run and ?having almost no expenses.? A couple reasons why educating chicks in the developing world is a good idea: ?All the research shows that for every additional year of schooling a young girl gets, maternal and infant mortality rates decrease by 15 per cent. Whether it's in Africa, Asia or the Middle East, the longer you can keep a girl in school, the longer she'll delay getting married and having children, and when she does have children, she'll have fewer of them. Also, the children of a mother who's been to school are more likely to go to school as well. There are so many positive effects, it really changes a community.? As abhorrent as the treatment of women in some of these dodgy countries appears to Western eyes, who the hell are Westerners to judge the social mores and traditions of other cultures, cultures that have been surviving just fine on their own for centuries? ?Well, in Afghanistan, a woman has a one in eight chance of dying while giving birth, where here it's one in 15,000. It's unacceptable that women should have this kind of risk, not in this day and age, whether it's a cultural thing or whatever. There are human rights and people should be treated properly. A woman should have a say in her family, in her community. And education, well, it's in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, signed by every country in the world, saying women have a right to equality of education. And countries like Afghanistan will not be able to lift themselves from the cycle of poverty unless the population is educated.? What they're working on right now: Raising 100K to support 37 different schools in northern Afghanistan, training female teachers and enabling some 1,300 young girls to get some learnin' into them. And raising another 100K to educate broads at the elementary level in African refugee camps. Last book read: Le Matou, by Yves Beauchemin. Musical preferences: Van Morrison, Elton John, Supertramp. Words of wisdom: ?Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.? ? COMMENTS? DIMWIT@HDOT.NET RACHEL GRANOFSKY

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    RESTAURANT TUTTO BENE HAMBURGERS SUBMARINES YOUR CHOICE - $8.95 SPAGHETTI W/MEAT SAUCE PENNE W/TOMATO SAUCE SAUCE MEAT LASAGNA LASAGNA YOUR CHOICE - - $7.95 $7.95 Midi Express 11:30am - 3:00pm 120 St-Viateur W. / 514-223-9255 62178.1 8 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 26 - JULY 2 2008 PANINIS WOOD OVEN OVEN 8" 8" PIZZAS PIZZAS YOUR CHOICE CHOICE - - $6.95 $6.95 WWW.MONTREALMIRROR.COM WWW.MONTREALMIRROR.COM WWW.MONTREALMIRROR.COM NEWS by PATRICK LEJTENYI dopted by city council last A week, Montreal's new transport plan certainly contains a lot of information. Available for public perusal on the city's homepage (ville.montreal.qc.ca), it's a whopper of wonk, and transport nerds will no doubt ogle the 246-page PDF with leering interest. There's a lot in there. Ideas about building a light rail line to Trudeau airport from downtown, for instance, and increasing the number of reserved bus lanes, a tramway system, updating the metro's fleet of 40-year-old cars, extending the metro's blue line to Pie-IX and major road spending. It spans two decades, and is supposed to cost somewhere a bit over $8-billion. It's ambitious and, of course, controversial. In the east end neighbourhood of Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, the Coalition pour humaniser la rue Notre-Dame remains distinctly unimpressed. They've been battling hard to block the city's plan to TRAFFIC Planning to move Montreal's long-term transportation vision contains tons of ideas, not all of them popular GIVE US OUR BOULEVARD: Coalition pour humaniser la rue Notre-Dame's Monique Dsy Proulx and Carl Bgin remake (modernize, the city says) the artery, which involves widening to four lanes in each direction. The coalition says it will double the number of vehicles using the street, to 150,000 a day. ?It's very contradictory,? says the Coalition's Carl Bgin. He says the city is claiming to encourage a reduction of dependency on cars and boost public transportation, but by widening Notre-Dame, it's doing the reverse. He also says the revamped Notre-Dame will make access to the river more difficult. ?Cities around North America and the world are fighting to recuperate space from automobiles,? he says. ?Currently, Notre-Dame belongs to the provincial Ministry of Transport. We'd like to see Montreal become the owner, so then we could change it into a real urban boulevard.? (The city insists that Notre- Dame will become an urban boulevard, but Bgin doesn't believe it. ?A real boulevard has an interaction with the neighbourhood it passes through,? he says, claiming the plan ignores the surrounding areas. They'll be holding an info session tonight, Thursday, June 26, at 1475 Bennett, corner Adam, at 7:30 p.m.) Arthur Sanborn, Greenpeace Montreal's climate change campaigner, says the plan to add 75,000 more cars to Notre-Dame is a bad idea, even if one lane is reserved for buses and taxis and another is reserved for car-pooling. The rest of the plan has some merits, he says, but he says it contains ?nothing new?. Honestly, it's not enough. It won't get done in time because there is so much institutional blockage.? But city spokesman Darren Becker disagrees. He says that, since the Tremblay administration took over in 2001, their priority has been to establish a long-term plan for the city's transportation RACHEL GRANOFSKY future. ?The Notre- Dame project had been under study for over 30 years,? he says. ?People had always said the status quo is unacceptable.? Numerous studies were conducted, numerous meetings with stakeholders were held and the administration rejected numerous ideas?such as converting Notre-Dame into a sunken highway like the Decarie?out of hand. He calls the accusations that the city steamrolled the project over residents' opposition ?completely unfair.? ?Obviously there will be nay-sayers to every project,? he says. ?There's never going to be a full consensus.? Another contentious issue that was floated recently was the idea of introducing entry tolls to the island. Becker says the idea is far from certain, but has its merits: the transportation plan's budget calls for an average $400-million to be spent per year. Becker says the city can use $200-million per year from its operational budget, but needs extra financing to achieve all its goals. Construction on Notre-Dame is expected to begin this fall. ?

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    NEWS SPORTS Eight seconds of fury Professional Bull Riding stamps and snorts into Montreal EASTERN TALENT, WESTERN PASSION: Sylvain Champagne by ERIK LEIJON estled in between events in N Alberta, Canadian Professional Bull Riding (PBR Canada) will be making its first ever stop in Montreal this Saturday, June 28. PBR Canada held sanctioned events in Quebec before, although the Bell Centre show will be the first time the nation's top tour, the Rocky Cup, will be saddling up in la belle province. The Rocky Cup features Canada's best cowboys, hanging on for dear life for eight seconds at a time. The American PBR was founded in 1992, with the Canadian office opening in 2005. Unlike a rodeo, which features different events, animals and sideshows, PBR is a sports league specifically for the best riders and bulls. In a standard contest, a rider must stay on the bull for eight seconds, holding on with one hand. Judges then award up to 100 style points?half the points are given based on the difficulty of the bull and the other for the rider's ability to match the animal's movements. A score of 90 is considered very good. Like any sports league, there are statistics and standings, while at the end of the Rocky Cup season, a winner is declared. ?For a bull rider,? says Quebec rider Sylvain Champagne, ?PBR is the most prestigious and professional name in bull riding.? The 28year-old native of St. Clotilde de Horton (east of Drummondville) first became exposed to bull riding at 17, at the well-known St-Tite rodeo, and has been involved in the 10 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 26 - JULY 2 2008 sport ever since. He's the only Quebec rider participating at the Montreal show, but he feels interest is growing here. ?When I started, the Quebec bull riding scene was a lot less developed,? he says. ?The rodeos here are much more professional now? we have teams working hard to have rodeos sanctioned by American organizations. A lot of the passion for riding out west has been gradually coming east.? RESPECT AND PAIN Montreal's first exposure to bull riding was given by a Western Canadian group at Expo 67. The sport remains king in Alberta, where the PBR Canada headquar- 2007 ROCKY CUP CHAMP: Pankewitz collecting hardware ANDY WATSON ters and most of the human athletes reside. For the Montreal show, shorter travelling distance means the bulls will primarily be from the eastern United States. Like the riders, bulls have their own statistics and year-end awards for their bucking prowess. Famous hellraisers like three-time American champion Little Yellow Jacket are as much a part of the lore of riding as the men sitting atop them. ?You have to go at every bull the same, no matter what he does,? says 2007 Rocky Cup champion Tyler Pankewitz, a Warburg, Alberta native who will be bringing his cowboy hat to Montreal despite currently being on the world's best riding division, the American Built Ford Tough Series. ?You can't really do anything to make them buck harder. They really have minds of their own.? Champagne also admits there isn't much preparation before a ride. ?A lot of bulls have their own unique patterns, but once they open the gate, you really don't know what to expect.? Other than a serious pair of Rocky Mountain oysters, what separates a PBR rider from your typical buckaroo? Both riders admit remaining focused and not losing concentration are paramount if one hopes to move in unison with an 1,800-pound bull. ?It's not a fight with the animal,? says Champagne. ?You're working together with it.? Another common ingredient shared by riders is a high tolerance for pain and the mental fortitude to climb back onto the saddle. ?I've fractured my jaw, had three broken noses, smashed carotid artery, broken collarbone, leg, ribs?and that's not counting the usual bumps and bruises,? says Champagne. ?Broken foot, a few concussions, broken ribs,? says Pankewitz, adding, ?I've been pretty lucky.? A BUCKING BULL IS A HEALTHY BULL In fact, bull riding companies typically field more concerns over the treatment of the bulls than the men who find themselves trampled underneath them. After the gruesome sight of racehorse Eight Belles being euthanized on the track immediately following a horrific injury at this year's Kentucky Derby, the debate over animal welfare in sport has been re-ignited. PBR has a long-standing policy concerning their quadrupedal stars: bulls only buck once a day, have special diets, daily limits on travel (maximum 10 hours per day) and the riders' spurs are dulled to prevent injury. The flank strap? the rope used to encourage the bull to kick higher once out of the chute?doesn't interfere with the bulls' genitals and isn't wrapped tightly around the beasts' thick skin. Also, the bulls aren't bucking because they are prodded into doing so; years of special breeding has created a generation of genetically pre-disposed bucking bulls. As a sport, PBR lives or dies based on the health and ability of their animals, which Champagne says will astound anyone who sees them in person. ?You really don't get the same impression of just how big these ani- ATHLETE AND RIDER: Tyler Pankewitz mals are until you see them live.? Pankewitz also adds, ?Just be sure to watch how the bulls buck. People who attend are going to see people getting stomped on, guys getting hurt, guys getting 90 point rides. It's way better than on television.? ? Sound like a cowboy Hooked, hung up and down in the well... t's one thing to have the cowboy look down?chaps, hat, vest Iadorned with advertisements?but it's another thing to have the lingo of a Calgary Stampede regular. Here are a few terms that may pop up during the inaugural Rocky Cup Montreal event: OUT OF THE CHUTE: 1,800 pounds of bull Barrelman: The MC who entertains the crowd during intermissions Bull rope: The rope used by a rider to hang onto the bull Bucked off: When a rider gets thrown off the horse before eight seconds, resulting in disqualification Chute: The contained space where the bull and rider stay before beginning the ride. Once the chute door opens, the eight-second ride begins Down in the well: When a bull is spinning and pulls the rider down the side into the middle of the spinning. Considered dangerous Flank strap: A rope that goes around the bull to encourage the bull to buck higher Foul: If the bull hits the side of the chute or the flank strap falls off, the rider gets a chance to re-ride Hooked: When the bull goes after the dismounted rider with his horns Hung up: When a rider gets thrown off but his hand remains attached to the rope Out: Bull ride attempt Rank: A tough bull Stock contractor: The company that provides the bulls Turn back: A bull that bucks in one direction, then quickly turns in the opposite direction ? ?EL ANDY WATSON

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