Topics
Publishers
Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
M20080612
Books | 2008-06-12 11:45:30
Page 1 of 8
  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 1

    ?FREE JUNE 12-JUNE 18 2008 VOLUME 23 NUMBER 51 Come on, give us a try

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 2

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 3

    EDITORIAL Editor Alastair Sutherland Music Editor Rupert Bottenberg News Editor Patrick Lejtenyi Editorial Assistant Sacha Jackson Listings Editor Vidya Lutchman Copy Editor Lorraine Carpenter Contributing Editors Marites Carino (Dance), Sasha (Sex), Mark Slutsky (Film), Juliet Waters (Books) Contributing Writers Chris Barry, Neil Boyce, Scott C, Lorraine Carpenter, Michael Citrome, Byron Coley, Johnson Cummins, Gerard Dee, Stacey Dewolfe, Len Dobbin, Samer Elatrash, Malcolm Fraser, Michael-Oliver Harding, Lina Harper, Matthew Hays, Christopher Hazou, Veronica Islas, Matt Jones, Raf Katigbak, AJ Kinik, Erik Leijon, Peter Lightburn, Tracey Lindeman, Erin MacLeod, Jeffrey Malecki, Anne Marie Marko, Lateef Martin, Jack Oatmon, Genevieve Paiement, Mathilde Rabbat, Christine Redfern, Scott Saxon, Shane Sinnott, Al South, Christopher Sykes, Alex Tigchelaar, Vincent Tinguely, Lucas Wisenthal, Narcel X, Andrea Zanin, Steve Zylbergold ART Art Director Chris Tucker Assistant Art Director Nicolas Ct Photographers and Illustrators Rachel Granofsky, Dave Rosen, Richard Suicide, Rick Trembles Flat checker Jeffrey Malecki SALES Advertising Director Stephen Ct Sales Representatives Nathalie Beaulac, Pierre-Yves Clment, David Greer, Genevive Perras, Lucie Plante, Marie-France Sguin, Christian Veillette Sales Coordinator Genevive Denis Classifieds Sales Manager Amardeep Assi Classifieds Sales Assistant Vronique Fournier Classifieds Sales Representatives Louis Clment, Patrick Wellens Promotions Genevive Perras PRODUCTION Production Manager Martin Ouimet Designers Huguette Bergevin, Pierre-Franois Bigras, Jessica Charbonneau, Celine Poupart, milie Salles, Yannick Sasseville, Jessica Zohil ADMINISTRATION Accounts Payable Mica Foti Collection Agent Joyce Rabagliati Distribution Gama 2000 Receptionists Fariba Bonakdar The Mirror is published every Thursday and is distributed throughout Montreal. 1999 readership measured at 287,000 by SOM Inc. Entire contents are Communications Gratte-Ciel Lte. The Mirror is located at 465 McGill Street, 3rd floor. Published by Communications Gratte-Ciel Lte (head office 300, Avenue Viger Est, Montral, H2X 3W4). Printed by Quebecor World Inc. (head office at 612 St-Jacques). Printed at Imprimerie Mirabel-Division of Quebecor Media, 12,800 Brault Street, St-Janvier de Mirabel, QC, J7J 1P3. National Sales Toronto DPS Media, 1240 Bay Street, #305, Toronto, ON, M5R 2A7, (416) 413-9291 National Sales Montreal Quebecor Ventes Media, 465 McGill Street, 6th floor. Montreal, QC, H2Y 4B4, (514) 597-2231 Subscription rates: first class $100/yr; U.S. subscriptions $125/yr. Canadian Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement #0229865. Change of address can be sent directly to our offices. THE MIRROR 465 McGill St., 3rd floor, Montreal, Quebec H2Y 4B4 Tel: (514) 393-1010, 393-8002 (classifieds) Fax: 393-3173/3756 General e-mail: mirror@mtl-mirror.com Community listings e-mail: listings@mtl-mirror.com Publisher Michel Desbiens www.montrealmirror.com A.A.N. ASSOCIATION OF ALTERNATIVE NEWSWEEKLIES MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 12 - JUNE 18 2008 3

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 4

    LETTERS WE Church and state together again? [Re: ?Fear of a secular planet,? Letters, June 5] William Richardson misunderstands the authentic separation of church and state and falsely equates the Catholic Church with totalitarianism. Philosopher Jacques Maritain wrote that democracy?what many consider the best form of government?emerged in human history as a temporal expression of evangelical inspiration and as such?in a historical rather than a dogmatic sense?is closely linked to Christianity, the foundation of which is Catholicism. Today, however, democracy is incorrectly perceived by many, like Williamson, as an ethically neutral political regime that is able to embrace values that are not only different but actually in opposition. Of course, this ?democratic relativism? is rightly aberrant to Christians because it is blind to the objective dimension of goodness and value. Every political regime?and democracy is no exception?needs to be motivated by absolute values. As a proof?a democracy that formally aims to neutralize the conflictual values present in the social 4 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 12 - JUNE 18 2008 fabric in the conviction that it can give them the only possible legitimate foundation, cannot refer in its turn, on pain of contradiction, to prior founding values. Religious motivation expresses a simple, profound principle: to provide a sound guarantee for the democratic search for the common good, which is at the root of every authentic political process. A policy that reduces democracy to a mere convention could not do this, as is demonstrated by the nihilistic yet impeccably democratic result of so much contemporary legislation involving life itself: I am thinking here of legislation that legalizes homosexuality, same-sex marriage, abortion, euthanasia and genetic manipulation. When decisions regarding life are put to the ballot, the binding character of laws is flawed: no conscience feels duty-bound to bow down to mere numbers, nor can a polling booth be exchanged for a chapel. ?PAUL KOKOSKI, HAMILTON, ON. They're both wrong [Re: ?The Iron Wall,? Letters, June 5] Both Ken Frankel and Jalal Hussain must be taken to INSIDE June 12?June 18 This Week THE FRONT p. 5 SLAPP!?St-Ray facelift? Teens get schooled in film? Benefit concert for Tibetan tech. NEWS p. 8 Shakespeare helps and heals in Once Upon a Midsummer Night?What to do at Festival Mondial de la Terre. MUSIC p. 13 Michael Hurley's freaky folk and funny wolves?Two surviving Sun City Girls look back?Chinatown go to China?Karkwatson's double date?No slack for James Pants?The Body Work party works your body?The Homostupids heave the Cleve. FILM p. 65 Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul on film and censorship?First Peoples' Festival picks?Movies in the mountains at the Tremblant Film Festival?The Incredible Hulk isn't?Young People Fucking is light and sexy?The Happening is NOT happening?Franois Miron's haunting The 4th Life?Weekly round-up?MPP on Vampires' Night Orgy. COVER p. 81 A Canadian classic goes Fringe. Degrassi: The Musical revisits your favourite Degrassi moments and puts them into song! Cover photo by Will Lew. ARTSWEEK p. 79 The Gate, celebrity obsession, the Infringement festival. THEATRE p. 80 Fringe picks: the good, the bad, the weird, the weirder? The Wise Men of Chelm and Alter Boyz. BOOKS p. 82 Pasha Malla and Ryan Knighton hit the track at Dfi-vision. RESTO p. 86 Bistro Bienville's sumptuous menu is set to charm. Columns PEOPLE p. 6 Pro street poet Kathryn Hogan. RIFF RAFF p. 10 Special Canadian needs. WWW.MONTREALMIRROR.COM task for their letters. No, Mr. Frankel, no one has that right to brutalize and torture, while Mr. Hussain assumes that present Palestinian injustices are prompted PRESS START p. 74 Ninja Gaiden II. SASHA p. 95 Booty call. Every Week ROSEN p. 4 PUNKUSRAUCOUS REX p. 24 COMPACT DISCS p. 28 THE LOAD-DOWN p. 30 DISCO VOLANTE p. 31 RANT LINE? p. 34 THE INCUBATOR p. 36 VIDIOT'S BOX p. 73 SUDOKU p. 85 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY p. 87 CLASSIFIEDS p. 89 Listings LIVE MUSIC p. 61 FILM p. 75 OPEN CITY p. 83 STAGE p. 84 GALLERY p. 85 WELCOME LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Send your comments, compliments or criticisms to: Letters to the Editor, Mirror, 465 McGill St., 3rd Floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 4B4. You may also fax us at (514) 393-3173, e-mail your comments to letters@mtl-mirror.com, or visit our Web site at www.montrealmirror.com. Letters should include your name, address and daytime phone number. by the U.S. and Western powers. Frankel points to Concordia University's refusal to allow that cowboy, Benjamin Netanyahu, to address his Mein Kampf to a Concordia audience. Predictably, outrage ensued after the invitation, paralyzing the entire campus. Concordia wisely suspended the invitation, and so it was good riddance for Netanyahu. Sober Israelis didn't want 'im either. More importantly, his invitation was from Hillel, supposedly a benevolent provider of Jewish interests. Instead this tax-exempt bunch constantly toots its horn for Israeli expansionism. Then, Mr. Hussain looks upon a ?pernicious Palestinian problem? as being prompted by the U.S. and some Western nations. This is not correct. Instead he terms the nations of Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Jordan as only being negligent in supporting Palestinian rights. Instead of merely negligence, they soundly detest the Palestinians while they do a brisk trade with Israel. They must be indicted for their own style of brutality, along with the hypocrisy in their words of lies and platitudes. Mr. Hussain's ?pernicious Palestinian problem? has a ready, tenable solution. Simply halt Israeli occupation. Occupation has never succeeded in world history. To this end, Israel must cease to allow a minority of religious fanatics to hold its Knesset in hostage. ?EDWARD ABRAMIC A shot to the genitals [Re: ?All about Uwe,? Film, May 29] My reasons for seeing Uwe Boll's latest act of destruction, Postal, were rather common ones. A) I had never witnessed an act of destruction from the German horrorist and B) I was curious to see how his own post-Hitler shame and loathing would blend with a broader European disgust and obsession for all things post-September 11th. And perhaps C) I was in the mood for some downright trashy Euro-trash. What I got, in the form of very, very bad, was a serving of Midwest manure souffl, replete with cues from Team America, Michael Moore and those porno-reality cop shows like Bad Boyz which appear to have fallen out of the rotten bowels of Maury Povich. The acting was predictably atrocious, including a self-debasing cameo by the director himself who, at the apex of the film's Grecian climax, takes a round of machine gun fire directly in the genitals. Dave Foley, who also exposes his genitals to the camera and thus me, was perfectly blas in his portrayal of a post-God cynic who starts a cult of sex and depravity simply to prove the point that humans are gullible enough to believe that he is the Messiah. I'm not all that familiar with Dave Foley's work, but this ?performance? will surely garner some meaty conversation at the next Foley family dinner. Otherwise, there were ample shots of blonde babes, bloodthirsty Jihadists, black-toothed hillbillies, and enough acts of senseless violence to warrant a warrant for Uwe Boll's arrest. Add to that a throughline that left this viewer feeling both robbed and ridiculed and you've got the latest requiem for the dead from Germany's bastard son of the C-movie. ?ADRIAN EBERT

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 5

    THE FRONT QUOTE SLAPP happy Suing your opponent out of existence is a well-worn tactic for those who can afford it, but a coalition of environment and human rights groups are hoping the province makes good on a promise to protect defendants of expensive, drawn-out lawsuits fielded by big companies against their critics. Many people are accusing Toronto-based giant Barrick Gold of using the tactic, called Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPP), against the small local publishing house cosocit for its book Noir Canada, about Canadian mining practices in Africa. The Ligue des droits et liberts, a Montreal human rights organization, together with l'Association qubcoise de lutte contre la pollution atmosphrique, wants Quebecers to send provincial justice minister Jacques Dupuis letters urging him to present a new law?which he promised in April?before the summer recess. On Wednesday, June 11, the Ligue and others held a demonstration outside the Palais de Justice and presented a petition to the minister's Montreal office. Ligue spokesman Andr Trpanier says that besides cosocit, several other important SLAPP cases are currently before the courts, all dealing with environmental issues. There will be a benefit concert for cosocit tonight, Thursday, June 12, at Kola Note (5240 Parc), 8:30 p.m., $20. For more info, see www.liguedesdroits.ca or slapp.ecosociete.org. ?PATRICK LEJTENYI St-Ray's new look The corner of Upper Lachine and St-Jacques has been a mess of roadworks since the old interchange was demolished last fall. Now NDG-Cte-des-Neiges borough mayor Michael Applebaum has a plan to transform the site into 400 units of affordable homes, a welcome announcement for local housing activists. But will it go through, or will it end up a bureaucratic mess? Habiter St- Raymond, a research project of the NDG Community Council, is organizing residents to make sure they get their say. Long neglected as the poorer underside of NDG, St-Raymond has seen significant investment since McGill announced that it would be building the MUHC superhospital in the area. ?There's condo development on residential streets and industrial infrastructure like laboratories being set up,? says Alex Megelas of Habiter St-Raymond. Megelas expects as many as 500 hospital workers may want to move here in the coming years, potentially transforming the area's demographics. A major affordable housing project could help ease the transition. Also up for discussion is the ecological nature of the project and the role of private developers. Habiter St-Raymond's collective site-mapping exercise takes place Wednesday June 18 at 6 p.m. at the St-Jacques Community Centre (5600 Upper Lachine). Call (514) 484-1471 for details. ?MATT JONES ANGEL: Grard Bouchard The Quebec sociologist, avowed sovereigntist and co-author of last month's Bouchard-Taylor report on reasonable accommodation is pretty vexed at his fellow Vive-le-Qubec-libbers. In an open letter published in La Presse and Le Devoir, he accuses the vocal hard-liners within the sovereignty movement of needlessly spreading fear, insecurity and anxiety over the report's recommendations that Quebec should, maybe, open itself up to the world a bit more. Bouchard, Lucien's brother, came under pretty sharp attacks himself last month when the report was delivered, mainly by the same people he's criticizing now?among them PQ leader Pauline Marois and Bloc Qubcois Gilles Duceppe. INSECT: The CBC When you have one actually popular brand recognized from coast to coast, it's best not to nickel-and-dime it. But that's just what the national broadcaster did with its theme to Hockey Night in Canada, specifically its little old lady composer, Dolores Claman, 80. Talks between the Ceeb and Claman broke down over royalty rights, and CTV?owner of RDS, TSN and 2010 Olympics broadcasting rights? swooped in to pick it up. The good news for hockey viewers is, as HNIC continues its long decline into irrelevance, CTV's stations will play the song throughout its beefedup hockey broadcasts. The CBC, meanwhile, announced a song-writing competition for a new HNIC theme. OF THE WEEK: ?The wind was pushing, and my truck started to dance on the road, lifting from side to side, swinging back and forth.? ?Trucker Rjean Chapdelaine, whose rig tipped over on the Champlain Bridge during Tuesday's storm. The near-hurricane force wind over the bridge was described by Environment Canada as a ?microburst.? CHECKING OUT THE BODYWORK: Crescent Street swarmed with Formula 1 fans, human advertisements for Extreme Mixed Martial Arts, the Incredible Hulk and many, many others on a sweltering Saturday afternoon. According to organizers, the 10th annual Crescent Street Grand Prix of Canada Festival drew half a million people over its three days. PHOTO BY JASON FELKER Movie boot camp More than a year ago, Jason Gondziola, manager of Concordia's student-run television station, decided the station should help up-and-coming young filmmakers hone their skills. ?It seemed a good use of the station's resources,? he says. ?We have a lot of equipment, and people who know how to use it.? The result, a two-week boot camp last summer, left students between the ages of 14 and 18 with the know-how on filming and production, skills that Gondziola says have become increasingly useful in the YouTube era. Student productions were screened at the end of the training to an audience of friends and family. CUTV is again offering youth a chance to learn filmmaking skills this summer, having hired a number of Montreal filmmakers to instruct the students. Registration?the fee is waived for students who come from fixed income families?ends on Friday, June 27. Training starts on Monday, July 28 and ends on Friday, August 8. In the first week of the program, students learn basic production techniques before they start shooting and producing their movies. For information on the program and on how to register, contact CUTV at (514) 848-2424 ext. 7403 or cutv@alcor.concordia.ca. ?SAMER ELATRASH Tech for Tibetans If you're looking for something to do Monday night that might actually make a difference to someone on the other side of the world, take note. Beginning at 8 p.m. at the Divan Orange (4234 St-Laurent), family-run Abitibi-based charity organization Technomonde will be sponsoring a benefit concert to help Tibetan refugees in India get themselves up to spec with the latest technology. ?We're hoping to raise $2,500,? says Technomonde representative Joel Gagnon, ?so we can donate two computers to the Delek hospital in Dharamsala in northern India. I'll stay there for a few weeks after that to train the hospital staff on using them, and if there's money left over, we'll put it towards paying for an Internet connection. These computers will bring real benefits to the local people, providing a tool for doctors to consult their peers in other parts of the world while keeping them up to date with the latest breakthroughs in medicine. Some 3,000 Tibetans cross the Himalayas on foot every year seeking refuge in India, and the Delek hospital is the first point of arrival for them.? Rocking the bill come June 16 will be, among others, none other than Joel Gagnon himself. Tix are $10. For more information, go to www.technomonde.org. ?CHRIS BARRY REAR-VIEW MIRROR 21 YEARS AGO - JUNE 12-JULY 2, 1987 A N G E L & I N S E C T On the cover: Carlos Santana, appearing at the Jazz Fest. ?Jazz will always be the elite of music, because that's what it's all about: playing in a very spontaneous and non-preconceived setting,? he says. ?It's dangerous and scary, but that's the beauty of it.? ? The USS Oliver Hazard Perry, which may or may not contain nuclear weapons, is en route to Montreal for a summer tour of the Great Lakes. Environmental and non-violence groups plan protests. ? Director Lizzie Borden researched ?a whole new breed of yuppie madams who have come from the fashion industry? for Working Girls. But, reads the review, ?somehow, among the Listerine and condoms, the women are lost.? ? The Mirror taps into the ?trend sweeping the country lately toward those nostalgic days of the corner restaurant.? Reviewed are Bagel Etc., Lux, the Rosemont Deli, Hamburger , Casse-Croute Pepsi and Chez Frankie. ? MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 12 - JUNE 18 2008 5

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 6

    6 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 12 - JUNE 18 2008 PEOPLE BY CHRIS BARRY Rhyme pays Local poet actually earns a living selling her work Name: Kathryn Hogan Age: 20 Occupation: Poet Bio: This perky Plateau wordsmith first arrived in Montreal from her native Calgary some two years ago to study creative writing at Concordia. A smart, arty chick who paints and plays piano to boot, Kathryn says she only really got into poetry after being exposed to the work of Charles Bukowski in Grade 11, back when she was a humble exchange student in Frankfurt, Germany. This past spring, upon completing her winter semester at Concordia and finding herself in the dreadfully inhumane position of ?having to find a job and work,? Kathryn awoke one morning with the brainstorm ?that maybe I could just sell my poems on the street for a dollar instead. I finally realized what Gandhi's phrase, ?Be the change you want to see in the world,' means. I recognized that if one is to try and live their life as poetically as possible, then you can't work a job that relies on people not living poetically but instead relies on their trying to fill the holes in their lives with consumerism?which ultimately just oils the wheels of a corrupt society.? Where she hawks her rhymes: On Prince Arthur at de Bullion. ?I like that corner because my friend lives right there and she feeds me lunch. I also do Sundays at the Tam Tam jams, which pretty well covers my rent.? How she gets people to fork over a loonie for some photocopied poem, albeit one that's on coloured paper: ?Well, you know, I'm a competitive spoken word artist, I do slam poetry after all, a format with no props or costumes where the maximum poem length is three minutes. So I've got all these short, high-energy pieces, these really polished crowd-pleasers I throw out where these people, they're all, like, ?Oh my God, let me buy it' afterwards. The other thing is, you want to make eye contact with people while they're walking towards you from, say, 30 metres or so. You need to burst their protective bubbles early, giving them enough time to get used to the concept that their bubble has been broken so they're more receptive when you address them with your poem. But believe me, breaking down people's bubbles all day is exhausting.? Has anyone ever come back to her days later, deciding her poetry sucks, demanding their money back? Yes. ?In fact, just yesterday, this girl came up and started yelling at me, shouting that the poem I'd sold her for a dollar a few days earlier ?wasn't a poem.' And she kept it up for, like, five minutes too. I guess some people have very limited ideas of what poetry is and what it can be, you know?? The volume of poetry Kathryn sells on an average day: ?I generally make between $10 and $30 an hour, depending on a few factors, like what time of day it is, if it's sunny outside, and, uh, (laughing) how many coffees I've had to drink that day.? Three poets she admires: Local boy Chris Masson, Spencer Butt, Michelle Dabrowski. Musical preferences: Beach Boys, Modest Mouse, CocoRosie. Last book read: Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut. Words of wisdom: ?Re-examine all that you've been told and dismiss everything that offends your soul.? ? COMMENTS? DIMWIT@HDOT.NET RACHEL GRANOFSKY

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 7

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 8

    NEWS by PATRICK LEJTENYI t's one of Shakespeare's goofier Iplays, and also one of his most beloved. A Midsummer Night's Dream, a fairy-land romp featuring ancient Athenians, beset lovers, unrequited love, petty vengeances, magic and (this being Shakespeare) mistaken identities, isn't necessarily the Bard's deepest or most complex work, but its charm has endured for more than four centuries. But a reworking is proving that, though light and fanciful, the play touches on some universal themes, and the cast and crew of Once Upon a Midsummer Night are tapping into them for artistic and therapeutic expression. Co-written, produced and starring the participants of Concordia's Centre for the Arts in Human Development, all of whom have developmental disabilities, the play is the culmination of the centre's two-year program. Members of the university's creative arts therapies, theatre, music and dance programs have been helping out. EDUCATION Midsummer dreams Shakespeare's play brings out the drama, love and laughs from Concordia's Centre for the Arts in Human Development 8 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 12 - JUNE 18 2008 According to Lenore Vosberg, the centre's clinical coordinator, staging a play?this is the eighth show produced, and the first musical?is both clinically and therapeutically valuable. For the centre's participants, she says, ?Working with people in a creative way brings out politically therapeutic issues like self-esteem and self-confidence. They were involved in things like casting and the content?. It's about believing in oneself, but there are lessons to be learned, like lessons of love. We're seeing issues like living social relationships and love triangles, so we felt Shakespeare's story was appropriate.? Clinically, the centre is able to conduct qualitative research on assessment tools and measure modalities of progress, says Vosberg. A textbook is in the works, as is a documentary. Staging a musical play is never easy, though, even less so when the actors have next to no experience and have developmental disabilities. The play's director, drama therapist Mira Rozenberg, witnessed the same themes touched upon in the play in real life, and used those issues as therapy for the actors. ?There were love triangles, so we had to discuss how love is not a game, that you don't mess with people's hearts, how to be a team player and how we're all in this together and we have to help each other out,? she says. ?We get messages through this play as a metaphor when conflicts arise.? And while Rozenberg says teaching the actors how to memorize lines, sing, dance and act on cue takes ?exponentially longer? than others, the hoary clichs of the acting world nevertheless manifested themselves here. ?Oh yeah, we had ZIDANE THE PLAY'S THE THING: Once Upon a Midsummer Night cast latent divas, drama queens, people who would hog the spotlight, and also people who are very shy or nervous,? she says. ?There was a lot of performance anxiety. This is a big moment for them, to be recognized as actors and stars. For them, it's their moment to be on stage.? Performing Shakespeare can be a daunting challenge for anyone, so the centre's adaptation took a number of liberties with the source material. The setting has been changed from ancient Athens to 19th century England's Fantastical Fairy Forest, the props, costumes and sets were designed in part by the actors, and they also contributed in no small manner to the dialogue. ?They own this play and they know they own it,? says Rozenberg. ?Personally, I've seen a lot more confidence, because they want this to be good.? ? ONCE UPON A MIDSUMMER NIGHT WILL BE PERFORMED AT CONCOR- DIA'S F.C. SMITH AUDITORIUM AT THE LOYOLA CAMPUS (7141 SHERBROOKE W.) ON FRIDAY, JUNE 12 AND SATUR- DAY, JUNE 14 AT 7:30 P.M. TICKETS ARE $15 FOR FRIDAY, $20 FOR SATURDAY, INCLUDING A RECEPTION FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCE. FOR TICKETS, CALL (514) 848-8616 61855.1 WILL LEW

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 9

    NEWS Global lovin' by CHRIS BARRY rom Monday, June 16 to Sun- Fday, June 22, taking its place alongside 25 other countries from around the globe, Canada will be participating in this year's Festival Mondial de la Terre, with Montreal hosting the action. Local organizers say the festival, which originated in France, is designed to be an event ?where everyone involved in the protection of the environment, people from all over the world, can get together in the spirit of peace and solidarity to express their commitment to the planet and its people.? ?The purpose of le Festival Mondial de la Terre is to try to get people to think about the environment and its protection in a festive ENVIRONMENT Montreal gives the Earth a hug with the Festival Mondial de la Terre way,? explains festival spokesperson Serge Grenier. ?We don't want to hear a lot of crying about it or any recrimination, we want the event to be something positive, something fun, something pleasant for everyone.? And hey, if you can't find it in yourself to have a ball while some three plant or animal species disappear from the planet every hour, while the oceans rise to dangerous levels and our forests turn to desert, then maybe you're just not trying hard enough. You, more than anyone, need to head down and check out a few festival highlights. And speaking of highlights, here's a handful to look forward to. For a complete schedule, go to festivaldelaterre.ca. MODEL CITIZEN: Le Grand Dfil Vert 2008 SYMFUNNY Le Grand Dfil Vert 2008 kicks things off on Monday, June 16, at 7 p.m. at the Saint-Jean Baptiste Church (4237 Henri- Julien, at Rachel). Yup, it's a fashion show, but not just any fashion show, because, as Grenier points out, ?Every element of the event will be green, and all the clothes on display will have been made from recycled fabrics. Even the hairspray the stylists use will be organic. So while the main idea is to promote something green, it's also a fashion show with over 100 very beautiful models and 25 designers participating.? Throw in a few vedettes, Marc Bland, Kim Bingham and a heap of surprise guests and you've got yourself one heck of a green fashion wingding. Tickets are 10 bucks. Fiesta Cubana: If you're in the mood for bashing the United States about the absurdly ridiculous embargo they placed upon Cuba some 46 years ago, one they stubbornly still cling to in spite of it being considered a joke to the rest of the planet for almost as long, then this evening of Caribbean cabaret might be right up your alley. Featured guests include EVERYTHING'S GOING GREEN: Salon National de l'Environnement Ernesto A. Senti Darias, ambassador to Canada for the Castro bros' brutally repressive regime, who will be on hand to express solidarity for five Cuban ?heroes unjustly imprisoned in the U.S.? Tickets are five bucks and music will be provided by Caliente Son among others. It all goes down at Caf Campus (57 Prince Arthur E.), Wednesday, June 18, at 8 p.m. Journe de la Lenteur: For the less energetic environmentalists among us, come spend Saturday, June 21, from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. lazing around Lafontaine park by the statue of Flix Leclerc. The idea is, basically, to actively chill and maybe meditate, do some knitting, some singing, some laughin' and generally just do your best to have a good time with a whole lot of kindred spirits all looking to do the same thing. Danse Plantaire Solstice: After a day of getting good and restless doing a lot of nothing at Lafontaine Park, head on over to Bain Mathieu (2915 Ontario E.) to get your groove on to the stylin' tribal, house and trance sounds of righteous DJs Yvy and Prophety. Organic juice drinks will be served and the films Tout Rien (1979) and Repercussions (2005) will be screened over the course of the night. Tickets are $15, $10 for students. Also taking place this weekend (Friday, June 13 to Sunday, June 15) along a similar theme will be Salon National de l'Environnement, which runs from 10 a.m.?8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and from 10 a.m.?5 p.m. on Sunday at the Old Port. Organizers expect 165 exhibits to be on display, with practical workshops, public conferences, hosted booths and other events taking place throughout the weekend. With its objective being to ?make visitors aware of today's environmental challenges while proposing solutions and tools for people to have a better understanding and to encourage behavioural changes,? a wealth of valuable information should be up for grabs, and better, at no cost, given that admission is free. For more information about some of the discussions and workshops taking place?ranging in scope from Combating Climate Change to Green Products: Myth or Reality?go to www.sne2008.com. ? MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 12 - JUNE 18 2008 9 IMAGEECOTERRE

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 10

    10 MONTREAL MIRROR JUNE 12 - JUNE 18 2008 RIFF-RAFF Dealing with Canadians Organizers of the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympic Games in August and Paralympic Games have recalled a 200-page training manual for volunteers and issued an apology for inappropriate language in the document used to describe disabled people. For the optically disabled, the manual advises volunteers to ?try not to use the word ?blind' when you meet for the first time.? It also describes the physically disabled as having ?unusual personalities because of disfigurement? and says they ?can be stubborn and controlling.??CBC News SECTION 3.5B?HOW TO DEAL WITH CANADIANS When volunteering for the Olympic Games, there is a very good chance you will be coming across Canadians. These people require special care, as they are very sensitive and easily ?spooked.? Special care must be given and it is for this reason we have assembled a special section to help you properly deal with these strange people. Recognizing a Canadian: The first step in dealing with a Canadian is identifying one. Even though it is often very difficult to tell most white people apart since they all have round eyes and smell like milk, once you know the signs, it is quite easy to spot a Canadian. Their flag: Even though they do not like to consider themselves nationalistic, when Canadians leave their country they have a compulsion to sew their flag onto their backpacks, jackets or hats (pronounced: toooks). This is not necessarily because they are proud of their country, but mostly that they don't want to be mistaken for Americans. They feel that their flag is a magical talisman that will save them from being scammed or stabbed. Feel free to scam or stab them, they are trusting and gullible. Familiarize yourself with the Canadian flag. It looks like our glorious Chinese flag except with weird white patches and no yellow pointy thingy in the corner. If the red leaf in the centre of the flag is green and spikier, that means that the person you are talking to is from a place called Vancouver and that they smoke illegal drugs. Browns are Canadian too! If you see a Canadian flag on the bag or jacket of a non-white person, don't be surprised; they are also Canadian! Or maybe they're just an American who doesn't want to be stabbed. In any case, keep in mind: Canadians not only come in all shapes and sizes (although never as wide as Americans), they also come in different colours! In fact, Canadians love to talk about how their country is a ?cultural mosaic.? Which is just another way to say they like to keep their races nice and separate. Conversation: So you've found a Canadian. Congratulations! You will soon see they are nothing to be afraid of. Sure they do things like ?hang aboot the hoose,? but they are quite friendly. Actually, they are so friendly it's a little annoying. They're programmed to get along. You can test this by giving them a slap. See? All they did is smile sheepishly and say ?Woops! I think my face just ran into your palm. I'm so sorry!? SAFE TOPICS Weather: Even though they complain about it all the time Canadians love to talk about the weather. It's one of those defining things they love to hate to talk about, like maple syrup, or riding their polar bears to their igloo farms. Sports: According to our cultural researchers, the favourite sport in Canada is called ?Hackey.? Which according to our research consists of two or more people trying to keep a footbag off the ground by any means necessary besides using the palms of his/her hands. Passing the sack is always appreciated in contrast to hording it (being a sack hog). Preliminary research suggested that their national sport consisted of grown men putting metal blades on their feet and using sticks to push a black piece of plastic around as they glide on ice, which was obviously too ridiculous to be true. TOPICS TO AVOID Race: Never point out race to Canadians because they'll look at you like they don't know what you're talking about. They've been so inundated by political correctness that if they ask where the ATM is and you say, ?Oh it's just over there, next to the black dude with the orange cap,? they'll respond indignantly, ?Oh I'm sorry, I don't see colour.? Canadians are not Americans: It is very important that you do not mistake a Canadian for an American. Even though they are culturally and economically dependent on the U.S., Canadians spend hours explaining how different the two countries are, then go home and watch American satellite TV, listen to rap music and eat Happy Meals. ? RIFF-RAFF@SYMPATICO.CA BY RAF KATIGBAK

Page 1 of 8

Please wait