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Books | 2008-05-22 10:23:52
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    ?FREE MAY 22-MAY 28 2008 VOLUME 23 NUMBER 48 Learn English here!

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    EDITORIAL Editor Alastair Sutherland Music Editor Rupert Bottenberg News Editor Patrick Lejtenyi Editorial Assistant Sacha Jackson Listings Editor Vidya Lutchman Copy Editor Lorraine Carpenter Contributing Editors Marites Carino (Dance), Sasha (Sex), Mark Slutsky (Film), Juliet Waters (Books) Contributing Writers Chris Barry, Neil Boyce, Scott C, Lorraine Carpenter, Michael Citrome, Johnson Cummins, Gerard Dee, Stacey Dewolfe, Len Dobbin, Samer Elatrash, Erin Flynn, Malcolm Fraser, Michael-Oliver Harding, Matthew Hays, Christopher Hazou, Veronica Islas, Matt Jones, Raf Katigbak, AJ Kinik, Erik Leijon, Peter Lightburn, Tracey Lindeman, Erin MacLeod, Jeffrey Malecki, Anne Marie Marko, Lateef Martin, Jack Oatmon, Genevieve Paiement, Mathilde Rabbat, Christine Redfern, Scott Saxon, Shane Sinnott, Al South, Christopher Sykes, Alex Tigchelaar, Vincent Tinguely, Lucas Wisenthal, Narcel X, Andrea Zanin, Steve Zylbergold ART Art Director Chris Tucker Assistant Art Director Nicolas Ct Photographers and Illustrators Rachel Granofsky, Dave Rosen, Richard Suicide, Rick Trembles Flat checker Jeffrey Malecki SALES Advertising Director Stephen Ct Sales Representatives Nathalie Beaulac, Pierre-Yves Clment, David Greer, Genevive Perras, Lucie Plante, Marie-France Sguin, Christian Veillette Sales Coordinator Genevive Denis Classifieds Sales Manager Amardeep Assi Classifieds Sales Assistant Vronique Fournier Classifieds Sales Representatives Louis Clment, Patrick Wellens Promotions Genevive Perras PRODUCTION Production Manager Martin Ouimet Designers Huguette Bergevin, Pierre-Franois Bigras, Jessica Charbonneau, Celine Poupart, milie Salles, Yannick Sasseville, Jessica Zohil ADMINISTRATION Accounts Payable Mica Foti Collection Agent Joyce Rabagliati Distribution Gama 2000 Receptionists Fariba Bonakdar The Mirror is published every Thursday and is distributed throughout Montreal. 1999 readership measured at 287,000 by SOM Inc. Entire contents are Communications Gratte-Ciel Lte. The Mirror is located at 465 McGill Street, 3rd floor. Published by Communications Gratte-Ciel Lte (head office 300, Avenue Viger Est, Montral, H2X 3W4). Printed by Quebecor World Inc. (head office at 612 St-Jacques). Printed at Imprimerie Mirabel-Division of Quebecor Media, 12,800 Brault Street, St-Janvier de Mirabel, QC, J7J 1P3. National Sales Toronto DPS Media, 1240 Bay Street, #305, Toronto, ON, M5R 2A7, (416) 413-9291 National Sales Montreal Quebecor Ventes Media, 465 McGill Street, 6th floor. Montreal, QC, H2Y 4B4, (514) 597-2231 Subscription rates: first class $100/yr; U.S. subscriptions $125/yr. Canadian Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement #0229865. Change of address can be sent directly to our offices. THE MIRROR 465 McGill St., 3rd floor, Montreal, Quebec H2Y 4B4 Tel: (514) 393-1010, 393-8002 (classifieds) Fax: 393-3173/3756 General e-mail: mirror@mtl-mirror.com Community listings e-mail: listings@mtl-mirror.com Publisher Michel Desbiens www.montrealmirror.com A.A.N. ASSOCIATION OF ALTERNATIVE NEWSWEEKLIES MONTREAL MIRROR MAY 22 - MAY 28 2008 3

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    LETTERS WE Sea Shepherd PR [Re: ?Death and doubloons,? News, May 8] The story about the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society?s monitoring of the seal hunt in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence was as interesting for its apparent lack of impartiality as it was for its subject matter. Your paper allocated ample ink to Sea Shepherd volunteer Shannon Mann?s account of the Sea Shepherd?s confrontations with the Canadian Coast Guard and the ?predictably furious? local fishermen in Saint-Pierre. However, you either made no attempt to talk to the Coast Guard or the fishermen or failed to report that they declined to discuss the matter with you. Fortunately, despite the lack of comments from those sources, Mann?s comments provide lots of unintended perspective. She said Sea Shepherd founder Paul Watson stepped onto seal hunters? home turf and called them 4 MONTREAL MIRROR MAY 22 - MAY 28 2008 ?cigarette-smoking apes? and ?sadistic, vicious killers.? If that?s true, he lost the support of many people who otherwise might have agreed with him. Unless his intent is to anger everybody instead of solving problems, Watson needs to take a long sabbatical by enrolling in a public relations course. ?JOSEPH OWEN Paul Watson, calling sealers ?sadistic, vicious killers,? will clearly not endear you to the people of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, or any people that engage in fishing-related activity for that matter. But really, ?cigarette-smoking apes?? Never mind that as a smoker I am offended, but it?s also clearly an insult to all apes, and a surprising one, given the SSCS?s history of defending animal rights. I guess the SSCS will be hardpressed to find many friendly ports free of fisherman, cigarette-smok- INSIDE May 22?May 28 This Week THE FRONT p. 5 Rights camp?Algonquins on the move?Earth dancing? Studios open in Mile-End. NEWS p. 8 The annual Ethnoculture event looks at the lives of queers of colour?The Long Hall lives and ferments. MUSIC p. 16 Islands sail into Arm?s Way? Los Campesinos! tales from Wales?Sam Roberts, home at last?Mutek highlights?DJ Evalicious: from fashion to mashin??Rocket to Russia rocks the Kremlin?Tuques off to Payz Play. FILM p. 34 A return to form in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull?Exte presents a hairy situation?MPP on The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave. ARTSWEEK p. 45 The MAC?s first Quebec Triennial, Til Kingdom Come..., FTA picks. ARTS p. 46 Accs Asie brings Eastern cultures together at The Garden of Love. COVER p. 34 Marie-Monique Robin on the agricultural multinational corporation Monsanto, and what its questionable practices may mean for consumers. Cover image courtesy of the National Film Board of Canada. BOOKS p. 47 Steven Kurutz?s Like a Rolling Stone goes behind the scenes with tribute bands. THEATRE p. 47 The lowdown on Festival TransAmriques. RESTO p. 52 Le Roi du Wonton is the king of noodles. Columns PEOPLE p. 6 Holistic therapist Lesley Pavitt. RIFF RAFF p. 10 Raf?s double life. PRESS START p. 38 NBA Ballers: Chosen One. WWW.MONTREALMIRROR.COM SASHA p. 63 Real love goes live online. Every Week ROSEN p. 4 PUNKUSRAUCOUS REX p. 22 COMPACT DISCS p. 24 THE LOAD-DOWN p. 26 DISCO VOLANTE p. 26 RANT LINE? p. 27 THE INCUBATOR p. 28 VIDIOT?S BOX p. 36 SUDOKU p. 51 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY p. 53 CLASSIFIEDS p. 57 Listings LIVE MUSIC p. 29 FILM p. 39 OPEN CITY p. 50 STAGE p. 48 GALLERY p. 49 WELCOME LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Send your comments, compliments or criticisms to: Letters to the Editor, Mirror, 465 McGill St., 3rd Floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 4B4. You may also fax us at (514) 393-3173, e-mail your comments to letters@mtl-mirror.com, or visit our Web site at www.montrealmirror.com. Letters should include your name, address and daytime phone number. ers and apes. The third one may be pretty easy, but good luck with the first two. Oh wait, I forgot. The Mounties ?played right into their hands? by boarding their ship after they entered territorial waters and had previously rammed the Coast Guard, and as the author points out ?the media loved it.? Quite the PR coup indeed! ?PETER SUTHERLAND Frankel vs. Finkelstein [Re: ?A cut below,? Letters, May15] Okay Frankel, now you?ve done it! Until now, I have frequently seen and, at times, even read a few of your diatribes, assuming that you were on the editorial staff of the Mirror, or that you were at least providing oral services to the editors in exchange for the seemingly unending space they provide your rants. But now, you have finally come out of the closet as a ?Goyimophobe!??one who has a morbid hatred for non-Jews. Now I?m pissed. As an intact man, I take offence at your casting aspersions on the prepuces of over three quarters of the planet?s male population. You can be a blatant Israel defender, no matter how heinous their behaviour is towards their indigenous population. That?s your right to free speech. But when you belittle one of your own with snide insults about his having a foreskin or not, you reveal your true self; a ?Goy? hater! Please tell me how that makes you any different from the anti- Semites among us? It?s comments like this that make me think that the mohel should have taken off more than the most sensitive part of your dick. As for where thoughts come from, yours emanate from a bit further back, just behind the testicles. Suggestion: start your own blog, at least then, those who really want to read your harangues can opt to do so, thus leaving some more space to others. ?GREG TUTKO Many of the Mirror?s pro-Palestinian readers have often used words such as ?ethnic cleansing? to describe the ?genocidal? practices carried out by the state of Israel. Well, if Israel is committing ?ethnic cleansing,? they?re doing a really poor job of it?since the Palestinian territories have one of the fastest growing populations in the world. According to a recent census report published by the Guardian newspaper?not usually a ?friend? of Israel?the Palestinian territories have one of the fastest growing populations in the world, with numbers surging 30 per cent in the past decade, while Israel?s population, grew a mere 5.17 per cent over the same period. Well, so much for ethnic cleansing. Guess Zionists are both evil and incompetent. ?BOSSMAN

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    THE FRONT QUOTE Know your rights camp Canada?s contribution to the ?war on terror? is increasingly banking on a public?s credulity and fear of terrorism threats, as five suspects continue to languish under security certificates and house arrest. The government is asking Canadians to accept its word that the suspects are threats to national security?suspects that in the past have included Maher Arar, an entirely innocent man sent with the RCMP?s blessings for a round of torture in Syria? although no charges have been brought against the suspects, nor any evidence provided. The security measures ?basically say that some people?s rights count more than others,? says Mary Foster, an organizer of an upcoming ?People?s Camp,? a day of workshops, art exhibits and theatre about Canadian security regulations and security certificates. The event, taking place on Friday, May 23, at the park on the corner of Jean-Talon and Parc, will start with presentations and an exhibit at noon, then a rally at 1:30 p.m. and a picnic at 6 p.m. ?We want to break the fear and isolation surrounding people targeted by national security measures,? says Foster. For more info, see www. adilinfo.org/en/node/380. ?SAMER ELATRASH Algonquins roll in Back in 1991, the small Algonquin community of Barriere Lake, five hours north of Montreal, signed a pioneering resource co-management and sustainable development agreement with Canada and Quebec. The agreement was designed to protect Algonquin land uses, conserve the forest and wildlife, and give the indigenous community a share in resource revenue from the logging and hydro projects on their territories. ?It was a precedent-setting agreement,? says Martin Lukacs of the Barriere Lake Solidarity Collective, ?and because of that, the government is afraid to honour it. In 2001 the Canadian government walked away from the agreement while Quebec has been delaying its implementation for years. In the meantime, the Department of Indian Affairs has ousted the Customary Chief and Council and, in its place, illegally appointed a small faction that lacks legitimacy in the community. It?s outrageous, and it?s all because they don?t want to share resource revenue with the impoverished Algonquins, revenue that represents $100-million a year.? The Barriere Lake Caravan will protest outside of Jean Charest?s office (McGill College at Sherbrooke) at noon, Friday, May 23. For more information, go to barrierelakesolidarity.blogspot.com. ?CHRIS BARRY A N G E L & I N S E C T ANGEL: Learning English The Gazette got quite a scoop when they got a hold of an advance copy of the long-anticipated Bouchard-Taylor report (although some are suggesting the report they got isn?t genuine, or the final draft), which is to be made public today, Thursday, May 22. The report recommends, among other things, that francophones, especially those away from urban centres, learn more English. Well, yeah. The benefits are obvious: learning another language is an automatic shortcut to better understanding another culture, it helps bring down borders based on ignorance and fear, and it makes Quebecers more competitive in an ever more global job market. Plus, it drives people like Mouvement Montral franais bonkers, which is always funny. Which brings us to? INSECT: Pauline Marois The leader of the PQ, along with BQ leader Gilles Duceppe, compared the report to Elvis Gratton, Pierre Falardeau?s often hilarious but slightly creepy cult comedy movie. The Bouchard-Taylor report has much to say about language, including how to change allegedly harsh terms like ?accommodation? and ?Qubcois de souche? to something fuzzier. Both called for the report?s immediate release, since delaying it would only sow more confusion about what?s in it. But that didn?t stop either of them from making political hay out of it. The newly charged Marois, who said over the weekend she?d like to team up with other sovereignty-minded parties to speed up independence plans, looks like she?s got a full tank of gas and sure to get good mileage out of this. OF THE WEEK: ?You know we are very close to Quebec, but I will tell that we also love Canada very much.? ?French President Nicolas Sarkozy, backing away from France?s traditional support for Quebec?s independence. BRUNCH WITH MOMMIES: A couple and their children take in the food and sunshine at Saturday?s family brunch in Lafontaine park. The brunch was organized by GRIS-Montral, a gay-oriented advocacy and research group. May 17 was the International Day Against Homophobia. PHOTO BY JASON FELKER Planet boogie Jour de la Terre Qubec is inviting all of you socially conscious toe-tappers to put on your boogie shoes and shake a tail-feather during the fourth annual E=MC2 (Every Move Can Count) Dance- O-Thon, taking place this Sunday, May 25, as of 2 p.m. at the Piknic lectronik in Parc Jean-Drapeau, to help raise money for several Quebec-based environmental organizations. So how exactly is non-stop groovin? to the hypnotic beats of local DJs going to help raise funds for Centre d?cologie urbaine de Montreal, Sierra Club and other like-minded do-gooder groups? Simple?you can dance for the good cause of your choice and get your friends to sponsor you by pledging whatever-dollar-amount for every hour you spend cuttin? the rug, or you can sponsor the dancer representing your favourite organization. ?It?s a chance for everybody to plug in and get involved in helping to create a better world at a grass roots level,? says Pierre Lussier, director of Jour de la Terre Qubec. ?People have an opportunity to really make a difference and have fun at the same time. They will be dancing for an important purpose. This Sunday, every move really can count.? For registration and information, visit www.jourdelaterre.org. ?STEVE ZYLBERGOLD Studios on display If you?re a tortured artist living in a converted textile factory by the train tracks in Mile-End, now?s your chance to meet your neighbours. The Ateliers Portes Ouvertes du Mile-End will showcase 21 art studios in Montreal?s bagel and indie-rock capital. Starting Friday, May 23, the neighbourhood?s artists will be prying open their locks to let the public see what they?ve been up to. ?There?s something mythical about the artist?s studio,? says Mathieu Beausjour of the Clark Studio. ?We always think of artists as isolated, so this is a chance to open up their doors.? Visitors can take in the works on display, go on a guided tour, walk or cycle up the ?art route? or just chat with the artists. All exhibitions are free. Although the north side of Mile- End still looks like the sweatshop district it used to be, it is brimming with artists who have snapped up cheap real estate and transformed it into a centre of artistic creation. More than 100 artists will be crawling out of the woodwork this weekend, including painters, sculptors, graphic designers, silkscreeners, photographers and videographers. The Ateliers Portes Ouvertes du Mile-End runs from Friday, May 23 to Sunday, May 25. See www.clarkplaza.org for details. ?MATT JONES REAR-VIEW MIRROR 12 YEARS AGO - MAY 23?30, 1996 On the cover: Mayor Pierre Bourque, who ?floats while his party and our city sinks.? His greatest weapon, according to Linda Gyulai, is ?silence.? ?You can?t be more innocuous or dull,? says city councillor Helen Fotopulos. ?So he doesn?t instill radical reactions like pure love or pure hate.? ? Following a crustcore riot on St-Laurent?sparked, rumour has it, by a ?few hardliners? denied re-entry into a show at Caf So on Rachel?local veteran punks and police alike are giving the ?fuckups, mescaline heads and glueheads,? in promoter Dom Castelli?s words, the cold shoulder and a hard time. A group of 70 punks, however, later apologized for the riot and offered to raise money to pay for repairs to the dozens of smashed shop windows. ? The Rant Line? prints what is says is its ?first and ONLY? wedding proposal (F, to ?Will, my yang?). ? British actor Ian Hart, appearing in Ken Loach?s Land and Freedom, says Cannes is all about ?wealthy people living in the south of France who are masturbating? and the movie industry ?pimps.? ? MONTREAL MIRROR MAY 22 - MAY 28 2008 5

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    6 MONTREAL MIRROR MAY 22 - MAY 28 2008 PEOPLE BY CHRIS BARRY Easing your grief holistically Alternatives to orthodox psychology exist for the bereaved, says counsellor Name: Lesley Pavitt Age: 48 Occupation: Grief/Therapeutic counsellor Bio: This sympathetic West Island gal had been working in a successful printingrelated business alongside her husband but ultimately ?found myself dissatisfied with what I was doing. Sure, I was good at it, but it didn?t seem to be making a difference in the world, nor was it particularly satisfying in a deep or spiritual way.? So, seeking an occupation that would satisfy her ?natural talents of active listening, empathy and problem solving,? in early 2005 she started her ?professional transition in earnest, getting the education I needed? and one year later found herself with a brand new career as a grief counsellor, which has since evolved into the Montreal Holistic Centre (www.montrealholistic.com), where Lesley and her crew offer everything from therapeutic counselling to reflexology, massotherapy and guided meditation sessions. Her relevant academic credentials: ?A distance professional therapeutic counselling course, some local courses in things with a psychological impact like psycho-oncology, and I undertook a mentorship program with a local psychologist.? Does she ever come across licensed psychologists who give her grief for trampling on their professional turf? ?Not so far, at least.? What the hey is psycho-oncology? ?It addresses the special issues cancer patients might face, the way a serious illness like that can affect theirs and their families? lives, the decisions they might have to take regarding treatments, just the impact it has on them. It?s a huge issue for someone to deal with. And sometimes the people around them aren?t open to talking about it, they?re not comfortable with it, and they can?t provide them with the feedback they need.? Does she make sure to pass around her grief-counselling card to the families of psycho-oncology clients in order to secure future business? ?Oh God no!? What people yack about in grief counselling: ?We generally talk about their relationship with the deceased, what were they like, what was it like to experience the death of this person, before, during and after the death, the shock afterwards, are they angry, not angry, what was left unsaid, what they would like to have said?I mean, the gamut is huge. Because generally, after a period of time, people around you don?t want to keep hearing about your loss, yet the amount of time it takes to deal with the death of a loved one is different for everybody. It can take years.? How Lesley?s grief counselling might make the rape-murder of your daughter not seem so bad after all: ?In addition to active listening, depending on the person and their situation, I?ll introduce different things like guided imagery or mindful meditation. A lot depends on what the individual is open to, if they?re into metaphysical stuff, then we?ll look into that, if it?s aromatherapy or sound therapy, then perhaps we will look into those therapies as well.? Her rate: $60 an hour and she makes housecalls. Musical preferences: Roger Hodgson, Mozart. Last book read: A New Earth, by Eckhart Tolle. Words of wisdom: ?What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.? ? COMMENTS? DIMWIT@HDOT.NET RACHEL GRANOFSKY

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    8 MONTREAL MIRROR MAY 22 - MAY 28 2008 NEWS by PATRICK LEJTENYI his weekend, Montreal?s gay, T lesbian, transgendered, transsexual, bisexual and queer communities of colour (whew!) will be celebrating themselves and asking hard questions about their place in the world. The fourth annual Ethnoculture event?two days and nights of parties, talks, workshops and more?kicks off on Friday, May 23, and while there won?t be any shortage of weighty issues to delve into, there will also be opportunities for GLTBQs from minority cultures to meet, mix, network and party. ?We?re specifically dealing with the intersection of sexuality and ethnicity,? says Ethnoculture?s Alan Wong. ?We?ve never tried to favour sexuality or ethnicity over the other.? According to Wong, Ethnoculture wants to ?demystify or dispel myths about [GLTBQs] to ethnic and racial communities, and sell these communities to [GLTBQs]. We want to SEXUALITY Queers of the world, unite! Ethnoculture celebrates and explores the varied, multi-hued world of gay visible minorities RAINBOW WARRIOR: Alan Wong build up solidarity among the various groups and allies, disseminate information and share knowledge.? In plain talk, that means holding workshops on topics like engaging with public institutions, fighting homo (and other) phobia in cultural communities and refugee services for GLTBQs in Canada. It also means theatre, film screenings, an art exhibit and a multi-faith panel addressing sexuality and religion. That?s a long way from Ethnoculture One, which featured, says Wong, ?two tables and a film presentation.? On Sunday, May 25, the testy issue of white privilege will be tackled. ?That?s the idea that the white identity is the one that is taken for granted as the identity of the community,? says Wong. ?Much of the queer media is targeted to the white or European gay community. There isn?t much of a presence of different colours of ethnicities, and it leaves little space for others who don?t iden- WILL LEW tify with that community. They feel excluded, ostracized, oppressed.? Wong says queers of colour face a double whammy when it comes to their sexuality. First is the obvious, additional ostracization from their family and community, which tend to be more socially conservative than mainstream Canadian society. ?As a gay Chinese man coming from a very Confucian family, I?m supposed to continue the family bloodline and continue the family name,? he says. ?[Homosexuality] is viewed as Westernized, a Western phenomenon, not a part of the heritage and culture. So we have to deal with that belief. ?On the flipside, in the mainstream gay and lesbian culture, there are a number of different ways racism takes root,? he continues. ?There?s the exotification of Asians, Latinos and Africans? Asians, for instance, are supposed to be subservient, servile and submissive. We have to challenge that representation as well.? The situation, he says, is even worse for queer women of colour. Wong won?t say which community is the hardest to come out in? ?Violence is always a potential threat, but what?s even more fearful is being turned away, neglected and shunned by the community?? but does ?hazard to say? that things get easier the longer new Canadians stay in the country and adopt local mores regarding sexuality. ?There?s more acceptance?or at least tolerance,? he says. ?More and more queers of colour are more comfortable coming out, but a lot still aren?t willing. And sometimes with good reason.? ? ETHNOCULTURE KICKS OFF WITH AN OPENING NIGHT PARTY AT VOIL, ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF SKY BAR (1474 STE-CATHERINE E.) STARTING AT 9 P.M. ALL OTHER EVENTS TAKE PLACE AT UQM?S SHERBROOKE PAVILION (200 SHERBROOKE W.). ALL EVENTS ARE FREE. FOR DETAILED INFO, SEE WWW.ETHNOCULTURE.ORG.

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    NEWS ART SPACE Alchemy, art and renovations The Long Hall survives, expands and ferments by ANDREA ZANIN wo years ago, things looked T bleak for the Long Hall, a livingspace-cum-art-studio-cumgallery in Park Extension. Fatherand-son landlord team William and Simon Berman seemed ready to oust the artist collective in favour of increasing the capacity of the building?s mini-storage facility. But in a happy turn of events, the conflict was resolved amicably?and then some. The Bermans in fact invested in renovations to create more space for artists, and signed a new five-year lease with John Tinholt and Vanessa Yanow, the space?s sole official tenants. ?For a while, we lost a number of studios and a bunch of people because it was a crazy construction period for about a year, with noise and dust and displacement,? Tinholt says. ?But now that it?s finished, we have 18 studios and there?s 30 people in them.? That?s double the number of studios they Special until May 31st, 2008* Upper lip or chin or underarms First treatment FREE for new clients used to have, and one-third more artists. ?It changes the character of the place a lot, since there?s so many more people here. The whole community aspect of running into people in the halls when you go to wash your brushes is enhanced. And because so many people can be in at once, morale has really picked up.? With artists working in a wide range of media and many collaborative projects in the works, the Long Hall has taken on a whole new feel. ?It used to be John and me keeping the wheels rolling with energy and initiative and pulling the group together, and now there really seems to be a dissolve in hierarchy,? says Yanow. ?After seven years, there are collaborations between the artists, on their own, without us persuading and coaxing. There?s a really nice alchemy going on.? In addition, Yanow is excited to see a new balance of francophone and anglophone artists, with more francophones joining the mix. STUDIO STEW: Sophie Priv?s ?Ivresse? METRO A. JOHN TINHOLT REPRIEVED AND REVEALED: Vanessa Yanow (front left), John Tinholt (front right) and Long Hall tenants SAUERKRAUT AND ROTTING DRESSES With a fresh crop of artists and an expanded space, the Long Hall?s creative energy is bubbling. Or? fermenting? ?We started holding an annual thematic group show six years ago, starting with the first letter of the alphabet and moving forward from there,? says Yanow. ?The first year, the theme was ?Adhesive.? Then it was ?Burnt,? ?Collision,? ?Deluxe? and last year was ?Echo.? This year being an F-word, we sat around, all 28 of us, pitching words and voting on them and arguing the pros and cons and lobbying, and finally we decided on?well, most of us regrettably ended up deciding on ?Ferment.?? Regrettably? Yanow laughs. ?It?s been a really challenging word to interpret. But ?Ferment? it is, and we?re gonna have a bunch of very interesting pieces.? With a glass and textile installation piece inspired by yeast, clothing design using burlap cloth planted with seeds that sprouted and have since been allowed to rot, large-scale paintings, performance art and more, the show is sure to intrigue. The challenge of working with Ferment may, in fact, have given rise to surprisingly ingenious art. ?It seems that because the theme is so difficult to interpret, people are trying really hard,? says Tinholt. ?One of the most difficult aspects of making art is that you make up all the rules, there aren?t any outside constraints on art because it?s art. But that very freedom can be daunting, a blank canvas can be just so blank, so a theme definitely helps.? The theme doesn?t stop with the art, either. According to Yanow, ?We?ll have an array of fermented finger foods. Clearly, there will be beer, wine and cheese, the standard. Sauerkraut too, most definitely.? But the artist food-making team is keeping most of the snacks a surprise. ASS-BACKWARDS GROWTH Future plans for the Long Hall include a street-level sculpture garden slated for opening within 18 months, a new Web site with a blog, and endeavours to become an officially recognized artist-run centre or non-profit organization. ?We really have done this sort of ass-backwards in the way businesses go, because we?re not a business,? says Tinholt. ?But we?d like to grow up a little and make ourselves more visible on the national and potentially international scene. It?s been good to reach out to some of the more established cultural bodies, come out from under our rock. I don?t see the gallery scene as a mainstream, but if there is a mainstream, perhaps we can be part of that.? ? FERMENT VERNISSAGE TAKES PLACE FRIDAY, MAY 23, 6?11 P.M. AT THE LONG HALL, 450/454 BEAUMONT. SHOW RUNS MAY 23-JUNE 1, 12?6 P.M. ON WEEKENDS AND BY APPOINTMENT DURING THE WEEK. CALL (514) 948-0227 FOR INFO. 59528.11 MONTREAL MIRROR MAY 22 - MAY 28 2008 9 RACHEL GRANOFSKY

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    10 MONTREAL MIRROR MAY 22 - MAY 28 2008 70,000 COPIES EVERY THURSDAY ADVERTISE 393-1010 RIFF-RAFF Two lives to live We all live double lives. For some of us, it may be innocent and non-committal, like the sports jock that?s secretly into soap operas, or the Ph.D academic that?s a gun-toting gangster in an online video game world at night. For others, it?s maybe a bit more involved, like the museum liaison officer who is also a bagpiping drag queen. For years, I myself had an alternate reality. From 2003 to 2007, I was a mild-mannered nerd journalist by day and superstar DJ at night. Well, okay, maybe not a superstar DJ. It?s not like I was being flown around to play foam parties and do rails of booger sugar off of strangers? abs. But I did hold down a weekly Friday night residency in one of Montreal?s swanky boutique hotels. The kind that charges $8 for a Labatt 50 (I know, right?). But what started as a lark, a way to make some cash while playing some jams for really, really rich people, slowly turned into one of the strangest social experiences of my life. Looking back on it now, it was a rare opportunity for me to see how the other half lives. The upper half. Sometimes, to watch people conspicuously consume with such abandon, was ummmm... how can I put this?? completely crazy? During peak times, some people just look for ways to spend money, and that includes paying off the DJ. Now to be honest, I had no illusions of what my job was: play music, make people happy. I?m not some music snob who scoffs at requests, and the truth is I like most of the stuff people ask for anyways (FYI: I draw the line at Pussycat Dolls). So I listen, especially if they grease the old DJ palm?? Here in brief are the three most memorable tip situations from my former life. BORIS According to management, Boris was rumoured to have ties to Russian mob. His brother supposedly owned the Benetton Race Team and he had just flown in for the Grand Prix on a private jet. While this sounds like a completely preposterous story, the first thing you realize when you work in the high-end service industry is that anything is possible. He had reserved the entire sunken VIP in the back of the club for himself and his stable of 10 six-foot-tall Amazons, who apparently liked to get ?jiggy with it.? ?Play heep-hop!? he commanded as he halfsashayed over, a girl on each arm. ?My girls, they want to dance sexy!? As he said this, he ditched the girls and came behind the booth and, taking out a wad of cash, he started peeling off twenties. At one point, he got tired of counting and then stuffed the entire stack of bills into my hand. ?Play 2Pac!? I looked at the ball of scrunched twenties and fifties in my hand, then looked up at him, ?Boris, for this kind of money, I?ll play 2Pac, 3Pac and mothafuckin? 4Pac if you want.? ISTVN Istvn appeared early one evening with a small entourage. I assumed he was some kind of European national, as he was well dressed, slightly Aryan looking and flanked by beefy-looking men in crew cuts, who I surmised were his personal security team. Eventually, when he got sufficiently soused, he staggered over and announced, ?I eem fram Hungary! My brother, he just became Canadian ceeteezen! You mast play song for heem! I give you manee!? Again, a stack of cash in my hand. So I ask what he wants to hear. ?Play Bariwide!? Ummm, what? ?Bariwide!? Sorry I don?t have that. ?Yes! You mast! Bariwide! You know Bariwide!? Umm, sorry, is he Hungarian? ?No! He ees fat black guy. Bariwide! He sings Kent get enaf of your lav babe!? It took me a minute, then it hit. Oh. BARRY WHITE! ?Yes that?s what I said, Bariwide!? I cued it up and played it. PETE Pete was visiting from Boston. Unlike most Bostonians, he wasn?t an obnoxious thick-necked chief who drinks too much and tries to start fights if people look at him funny. But like many Bostonians, he came to Montreal to get wasted and show us how real Americans party. At one point, he was enjoying my set so much, he threw a handful of American bills in the air above me and screamed, ?Yeah son! This is how we do it in Boston!? After my laughing fit subsided, I quietly collected the now boozesoaked bills and stacked them neatly onto the turntable. When I turned around, Pete was standing there and asked, ?Umm, hey bro, do you mind if I get those dollar bills back? I need them for the strip club later. I?ll give you the exchange in Canadian??? I counted out the 13 dollars for him and said it was okay, he could keep it. He insisted and gave me 10 Canadian. I guess that?s how they do it in Boston. ? RIFF-RAFF@SYMPATICO.CA BY RAF KATIGBAK

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