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Fourth Quarter Productions
Brochures | Advertisement 2009-11-09 06:39:49
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    David Bazzel

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    W hether it?s creating a national sports award, appearing in a network reality series, motivating thousands at a speaking engagement, raising audience ratings in radio and television, working with internationally known companies, or discussing health strategies with a Governor before rushing to anchor the 6 o?clock sports, David Bazzel?s versatility and creativity are undeniable and his successes impressive. Host EmcEE tElEvision Radio Public RElations maRkEting EvEnt managEmEnt davidbazzel@FourthQuarterProductions.com The numbers alone speak volumes: over 6000 hours of live talk radio, 15 years of live television experience as an anchor, reporter and show co-host, and an astonishing 2500 public appearances with 2000 of those including a speech, presentation or emcee responsibility. His exposure and interesting experiences with U.S. Presidents, Arkansas Governors, CEO?s, professional athletes and a multitude of special events along with his work in television, radio, newspaper, public relations, marketing and event management have helped forge a dynamic, unique and extremely broad skill set.

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    & Athletics Sports David on the cover of the preseason Athlon Magazine David?s drive and energy date back to his days as a Florida High School All-State athlete in football, track & weight lifting. His outstanding prep career led some of the country?s top college football teams to seek his services as a linebacker. Bobby Bowden of Florida State, Vince Dooley of Georgia, Howard Schnellenberger of Miami, and Lou Holtz of Arkansas all pursued David to join their programs. Leaving the beaches of Panama City in exchange for the hills of Fayetteville, his choice was Holtz and the Razorbacks, where as a linebacker he became a team captain and fouryear letterman. Coined by legendary Arkansas sportswriter Orville Henry Former Arkansas Coach Lou Holtz Last words to the team before leading them onto the field as the ?Burt Reynolds? of the Razorbacks, David participated in four bowl games under Lou Holtz and Ken Hatfield including the 1984 Liberty Bowl where he was named the television Mercedes Benz Most Valuable Defensive Player against Auburn and Heisman candidate Bo Jackson. David finished the game with 9 individual and 15 total tackles even while playing with a broken Team Captain and Four Year Letterman Razorback linebacker 1981-1986 hand suffered early in the first quarter. As the defensive signal caller he led the team in tackles in 1984 and during his senior season he was 2nd in tackles with the Hog defense finishing No. 5 nationally, allowing only four total rushing touchdowns and a record zero in all eight Southwest Conference games. His 1982 Hog defenders were the #1 defense in the country. In addition to Bo Jackson, David also played against such future NFL players as running backs Eric Dickerson, Craig James, and Napoleon McCallum, linebackers Kevin Greene and Wilbur Marshall and lineman Lomas Brown. His Razorback teammates included All American and Denver Bronco eight-time All Pro safety Steve Atwater, two time All-American and San Diego Charger linebacker Billy Ray Smith, All-American and New Orleans Saints defensive tackle Wayne Martin and Stephen Jones, current President of the Dallas Cowboys and son of owner Jerry Jones. Tackling SMU?s future NFL Hall of Famer Eric Dickerson Heisman Trophy winner Bo Jackson 1 www.fourthquarterproductions.com

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    & The first Gold?s Gym & Fitness Center in Arkansas Gold?s Gym Fitness Centers After graduation in the spring of 1985, David moved to Little Rock and was hired to become marketing director for the first Gold?s Gym franchises in Arkansas. In less than three years under his direction and leadership, Gold?s Gyms of Arkansas grew from one fitness center with five employees to three centers and seventy employees and over $1 million in sales. One of those three facilities was the largest Gold?s Gym in the country at over 60,000 square feet. Arkansas Sports Medicine David Bazzel 2 Media coverage for the new Arkansas Sports Medicine Center The first of three Gold?s Gyms in Little Rock In 1990 David was hired away from Gold?s by Dr. J. Roger Clark to develop the month old Arkansas Sports Medicine & Orthopedic Center, a clinic that specialized in surgery, physical therapy, and medical event coverage for the athletic community. As Director of Development, David?s vision and strategies played a key role in turning the new and unknown business with a staff of four and only a handful of patients into a prestigious multimillion dollar medical practice that attracted patients from every region of the state.

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    His efforts were highlighted by the completion of a new two million dollar state of the art facility in 1993 and his acceptance of the 1994 Distinguished Service Award. This award is given annually by the Arkansas High School Athletic Administrators Association for exemplary service to the state?s high school athletic community. David also helped create and coordinate the state?s first network of medical coverage for sporting events as well as the nation?s first high school athletic training course that provided college scholarships for outstanding performance. First statewide medical coverage for high school sports The nation?s first high school training course with scholarships Fourth Quarter Productions Because of his success with Gold?s Gym and Arkansas Sports Medicine, David sensed momentum for his marketing ideas and in 1996 decided to create his own consulting firm. Desiring a unique corporate name and logo that was reflective of his background in athletics, David conceived and designed Fourth Quarter Productions. Long synonymous with football, the raising of four fingers at the beginning of the fourth quarter symbolizes a player?s resolve to win the game regardless of score or fatigue, by dominating the last quarter. The hand in the logo is actually the one David broke while playing in the Liberty Bowl against Auburn and Bo Jackson. His decision to enter the logo in the 1996 American Advertising Awards, his first entry ever, proved rewarding as he earned honors at both the state and regional level and represented District 10 at the National Advertising Federation Awards in Los Angeles. The new Arkansas Sports Medicine & Orthopedic Center Serving as a consultant for Arkansas Sports Medicine in 1999, David initiated and secured contractual agreements and relationships for medical coverage with Arkansas? only professional hockey and Arena League football franchises at that time. The Arkansas Riverblades hockey team, a member of the NHL?s largest developmental league and the Arkansas Twisters football team of the Arena2 league both played in the $70 million 18,000 seat ALLTEL Arena. Physician and trainer coverage at athletic events The hand that David broke playing Bo Jackson in the Liberty Bowl became the focal point of his consulting firm?s logo 3 www.fourthquarterproductions.com

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    David Bazzel 4 The Broyles Award The Broyles Award was the first assistant coach of the year award in college sports history Coaching legend Frank Broyles gets his first look at the $5,000 winner trophy at a press conference in 1996 Coaching greats Grant Teaff, Dick McPherson, Bo Schembechler, and Darrell Royal served on the 1st selection committee David?s most challenging project came in the fall of 1996 as he made college football history by creating and directing the Broyles Award, the nation?s first assistant coach of the year honor. Up to that point there were multiple post-season awards for head coaches and for every player position but nothing to acknowledge the true backbone of college football, the assistant coach. With 8-12 assistants per team and over 1,500 total Division 1 assistants, the difficulty in creating such an award was developing a feasible process that would be credible in the eyes of coaches, fans, and the media. First, he named the award in honor of Arkansas coaching legend and former athletic director Frank Broyles. Broyles was a perfect fit, having had one of the most impressive list of assistants in college football history. Joe Gibbs, Jimmy Johnson, Barry Switzer and the rest of his assistants as a group went on as head coaches to account for almost 15 percent of all Super Bowl victories, 5 college national championships and over 2000 wins. David?s next move was the creation of a stellar selection panel that included some of college football?s all-time greatest head coaches: Bo Schembechler, Darrell Royal, Vince Dooley, Grant Teaff, Don James, Dick MacPherson, Tom Osborne & Lavell Edwards. At the end of each season, all Division 1 head coaches can nominate one assistant from their staff. The selection committee analyzes statistics and other information about the nominee?s individual players and team unit and then selects five finalists and the winner. David is the creator, executive director and emcee of the Broyles Award

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    2001 winner, Miami assistant Randy Shannon, is now head coach at Miami The national reputation of the Broyles Award has continued to grow among coaches across the country as well as the national media with references to past winners and future candidates in television game broadcasts and print coverage. The inaugural recipient in 1996 was Florida State?s defensive coordinator, Mickey Andrews. Other winners include: Jim Herrmann of Michigan-1997, David Cutcliffe of Tennessee-1998, Ralph Friedgen of Georgia Tech-1999, Mark Mangino of Oklahoma- 2000, Randy Shannon of Miami-2001, Norm Chow of USC-2002, Brian VanGorder Georgia-2003, Gene Chizik of Auburn-2004, Greg Davis of Texas-2005, Bud Foster of Virginia Tech-2006, Jim Heacock of Ohio State-2007 and Kevin Wilson of Oklahoma-2008. Each year all five finalists and their spouses are flown to Little Rock for the Broyles Award banquet. The Mark Mangino won a national title and the award at Oklahoma, then was named Kansas Head Coach The 75 lb trophy, designed by David, features Broyles and favorite assistant Wilson Matthews On stage: the finalist class of 2005, the 10th Anniversary of the Broyles Award The only national award presented from Arkansas always brings out a great crowd David is actively involved with the NCFAA, overseeing all college football awards Local and National media coverage about the award continues to grow Ralph Friedgen, 1999 winner while at Georgia Tech, is now Maryland?s head coach winner is given his own personal Broyles Award sculpture that was designed by David and costs $5,000.00 to reproduce each year. Over the past 13 years the annual awards banquet has been held in downtown Little Rock and averages more than 600 in attendance . In 2003 the Downtown Rotary Club of Little Rock became the presenting organization of the award and in 2005 established the Alzheimer?s Foundation as a beneficiary of the banquet. For the past four years the award ceremony has been broadcast on Comcast Sports Southeast with 5.8 million households in 12 states and the past two years the Broyles Award winner has been flown to Orlando to be recognized during the ESPN Home Depot Awards show. A website for the Broyles Award was launched during the 2000 season: www.broylesaward.com. 5 www.fourthquarterproductions.com

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    Frank Broyles was impressed enough with David?s work on the Broyles Award that he hired him in 1996 as a marketing consultant for the University of Arkansas athletic department with a charge of bringing new ideas and concepts to the program. In the first month of that relationship, David recognized the potential for a season-ending rivalry game and created the Battle For The Boot between the LSU Tigers and the Razorbacks. David designed the ?Boot? as a 4-foot tall, 200-pound replica of the states of Arkansas and Louisiana whose combined shape resembles that of a boot. It is finished in high polished 24 carat gold, cost $10,000 to create, and serves as a yearly rotating trophy that the winning team keeps on its campus. In 1996 LSU won the first Battle For The Boot in a nationally televised game on CBS. The game was aired for 13 years on the day after Thanksgiving, and in 2009 was moved to the Saturday following the holiday. One of the greatest Battle For The Boot games was in 2007 when Heisman candidate Darren McFadden led Arkansas to a 50-48 triple overtime upset on the home field of the #1 ranked and eventual national champion Tigers. David Bazzel 6 UA Athletic Department Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee and Louisiana Lt. Governor Kathleen Blanco unveil the ?Boot? at a press conference in 1996 UA triple overtime upset win against eventual national champs at LSU in 2007 LSU players carry the ?Boot? to their locker room after winning in 2006 In the 2009 Sports Illustrated SEC Preview, The Battle for the Boot was featured as one of the conference's best rivalry games

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    Named 1996 Young Executive of the Year In addition to the new football rivalry that year, David also created two new costumed Razorback mascots geared towards improving fan interaction, especially for children. He gave longtime fan favorite ?Big Red? a wife and child aptly named ?Soo E? & ?Pork Chop.? For his efforts on the Broyles Award and the Battle For The Boot, as well as his other business successes during the year, David was named the 1996 Young Executive of the Year by the Greater Little Rock Chamber of Commerce. In 1997 Broyles asked David to help increase ticket sales for Razorback football games by generating a more entertaining atmosphere for fans. In response David created ?Operation Hog Pride.? David?s two main objectives of ?Operation Hog Pride? were focusing on the unique Arkansas mascot, the Razorback, and creating a game day experience for fans that was festive and exciting. As a player, David always took notice that the team mascot was an extremely obese and lazy farm hog kept in a small and dirty 6-by-4 foot trailer on game days. He felt that fans and players would appreciate a mascot that was closer in likeness to the Razorback image. Because the Razorback is a unique mascot in college athletics, he also believed a real boar could be a better marketing tool and receive greater national exposure like continued on next page Targeting more Female and kid fans, David expanded the Arkansas mascot family The most recognized icon in Arkansas, the Razorback One of several giant Razorback banners that David designed to hang around the facade of the sixty year old War Memorial Stadium to enhance the game day experience for fans 7 www.fourthquarterproductions.com

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    Texas? steer, Georgia?s bulldog, or Colorado?s buffalo. After months of searching with the help of farmer Keith Stokes, David located and secured two tusk-bearing, 300-pound boars in the small community of Greenbrier, Arkansas, and changed the official name of the mascot from ?Big Red? to ?TUSK.? He then designed the construction of a new and larger trailer, so that the mascot would be more comfortable and more visible for the fans. It can also accommodate the entire 70 member cheerleading and spirit squads. David also was instrumental in establishing a breeding program to extend the bloodline for future TUSKS. TUSK?S favorite place to be, in a mud hole The Razorback mascot and his small 1960's trailer that was used during David's playing days in the 1980's David Bazzel 8 TUSK, the 500 pound Razorback mascot Future TUSKS ? Arkansas has one of the few lineage mascot programs in the country Feet up! Cheerleaders aren?t scared of their favorite mascot TUSK David?s new design for showcasing TUSK and hauling the 70 member spirit squad

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