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anthem Fall 2011
Magazines | Education 2011-11-02 12:17:50
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    anthem The magazine of Ambrose University College FALL/WINTER 2011 The Global Classroom Travel Study Programs

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    The dome of the Carmelite Church and the spire of the Anglican Cathedral of St. Paul in Valletta, the capital of Malta. Participants in the Down Ancient Paths sojourn to Malta experienced this and much more as part of the travel study program The Malta Institute: Exploring "The Sacred" at a Mediterranean Crossroads. This issue of Anthem features travel study at Ambrose and the importance of these ventures. Inside 5 International Experience David Peat, Associate Professor of Education, brings his extensive international experience to the classroom. 10 Ambrose Goes Mediterranean Malta was the destination for the latest Down Ancient Paths excursion into sacred history. 15 An Interview with the Board Chair Board Chair Alex Baum reflects on his time as chair and dreams a little about a possible future for Ambrose. 16 Residence and Education Centre In less than a year, the new facility went from a ground-breaking ceremony to the new home of 40 students and the education program. 2 Editorial 3 Academic News 5 Profiles 8 Athletics 13 Educational Travel 17 Anthem Extras 19 Family Ties Winter 2011 anthem 1

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    anthem The magazine of Ambrose University College Fall/Winter 2011 CHANCELLOR AND ACTING PRESIDENT EXECUTIVE EDITOR Riley Coulter EDITOR Elly Wick DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING Wes Campbell DESIGNER George Toth LAYOUT Verge Design PHOTOGRAPHY Erich Wong Daniel Yu PRINTER Rhino Pronto Ambrose University College 150 Ambrose Circle SW, Calgary, AB T3H 0L5 General Inquiries 403.410.2000 Enrolment 800.461.1222 Website www.ambrose.edu Publication Agreement Number 40063422 Anthem is published two times per year by the External Relations Department at Ambrose University College and sent to alumni, friends, and stakeholders. Ambrose is a Christian university college accredited by the Campus Alberta Quality Council, the Association for Biblical Higher Education and the Association of Theological Schools. Ambrose is the official denominational school of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in Canada and The Church of the Nazarene Canada. It serves close to 700 students representing many denominations in arts and science, education, undergraduate ministry and seminary programs. Donate to Ambrose at www.ambrose.edu/donate. Winter 2011 anthem 2 Our Commitment to Educational Travel R. Riley Coulter, DMin Chancellor and Acting President The theme of this issue of Anthem is educational travel, the opportunity our students have to travel to various parts of the world as an integral part of their educational experience at Ambrose. This past summer, Ambrose students travelled to China (Behavioural Science and Education), Costa Rica (Biology), Dominican Republic (Business and Behavioural Science), England (English), Greece (History), Ireland (Down Ancient Paths), Italy (History and Music), and Malta (Down Ancient Paths). As well, as part of the OnSite program - a six to nine month practicum experience - students are serving in, England, Ethiopia, Ghana, Paraguay, Philippines, and Poland. What an amazing opportunity for learning and discovery our students have enjoyed through these educational travel experiences! What an amazing opportunity for learning and discovery our students have enjoyed through these educational travel experiences! In some of the earliest discussions concerning the establishment of Ambrose, when we articulated what we wanted for our students, the commitment was made that, "Every graduate receive(s) some international experience during their years as a student." We continue to be committed to that goal. And in more recent documents, as a part of our Strategic Plan, when describing our World Focus, we state, "Internationalization addressed within disciplines... is encouraged through short and long term international travel and study." You will enjoy reading the adventures and discoveries of our students and professors in this issue. We appreciate the tremendous effort of our faculty to facilitate these travel experiences. We pray for safety and grace for our students as they experience new cultures, discover new perspectives, and learn of God's work in our world. And we pray that, as the students discover and experience their world, God would place within them a deep sense of responsibility for global issues as Christians in the twenty-first century.

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    Ambrose Students Help Reform a Nation Dr Adriana Fishta Bejko There are many ways to teach English to non-English speakers here in Canada but we chose to travel and be guests in Chinese classrooms because, as John Wesley stresses, it is much better to "carry relief to the people who need it than it is to send it, both for our own sake and for theirs." Not many people are given the opportunity we were given to minister to over 1600 students and instructors through serving them in a place that does not appear to allow for chances to share the gospel. As team leader, I was amazed at the humble attitude and servanthood displayed by our Ambrose students. Although the living arrangements were much better than we expected, they were not the same as in Canada. However, instead of complaining, the team showed that they can live an abundant life, filled with the gifts and fruit of the Spirit. Our students taught English to university age students (not much younger than themselves): classes had 50 to 60 students, the temperatures hit 38 degrees Celsius and humidity was sometimes as high as 90 to 100 percent, but the students persevered because they knew they were transforming lives, which will become the basis of a transformed society. A social care for all people, especially the young students in our classes, marked the daily activities of the team. Although this is the first year that Ambrose sent students to Hope University in China, our team was successful in turning a former dull campus where English was considered "an unnecessary burden," into a place that was "set on fire by the Ambrose team," as Vice President Jin said. Learning was happening not only in the classrooms but at restaurant tables as we shared meals with our students and Chinese colleagues, in a basketball game, in a debate team, on the soccer field, at the Canada Day Celebration we organized for our new friends, at the 5:00 a.m. practice sessions for final exams, and in the coolness of the underground parkade where students would retreat to study when the sun hit the zenith. We enjoyed meeting new friends and having a chance to talk to people from another part of the world. Our Chinese colleagues and students expressed their appreciation for us in different ways. One student said, "At Hope College we got to know some amazing friends from Ambrose College, we learned each other's culture and exchanged ideas like brothers and sisters." Another, "It gives us an experience other than school." Yet another, "You are Christians. You help people in an unconditional way." The Chinese rarely display emotions publicly, but at the farewell dinner in our honour, both teams were hugging and crying and saying "This is not goodbye; it is just au revoir - until we see each other again." But the gratitude didn't all flow one way. Ambrose education student Amy Wright commented, "The most memorable experience was arriving 15 minutes early for class and having every ACADEMIC news Ambrose education students taught in China this past summer. student already seated and cheering as I walked through the door. Having a foreign teacher was a rare opportunity for them. It makes me realize how blessed I was to be able to represent Canadians, Christianity, and Ambrose University College." The team was transformed by its Chinese experience and we look forward to Ambrose students serving at Hope University in the future. When we work together remarkable achievements result. Thanks be to God for all the service we have been able to give to hundreds of individuals. To serve others is to follow the example and direct command of Jesus. Success has nothing to do with what we gain in life or accomplish for ourselves - it is what we do for others that counts. Ambrose Well-Represented at Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting Each year in November several thousand professors and graduate students from around the world travel to the United States for the annual meetings of the American Association of Religion (AAR) and the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) to network with colleagues, to stay current in their disciplines, and to connect with potential publishers of their work. This year, these two associations are meeting jointly in San Francisco, and five Ambrose professors are participating in the program. Ray Aldred (Assistant Winter 2011 anthem 3

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    ACADEMIC news Professor of Theology) and Mabiala Kenzo (Professor of Systematic Theology) are part of a roundtable discussion focused on postcolonial dimensions of mission. Rob Snow (Associate Professor of New Testament) is presenting a paper entitled, "Mark's Son of Man and the Mysterious Picture of Jesus." Bernie Van De Walle (Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology) is presiding at meetings of the Christian Theological Research Fellowship which meets in conjunction with the AAR. Several other Ambrose faculty are attending the meetings as well. Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Spilsbury, who will also be in attendance at the meeting chairing sessions of the Josephus group of the SBL, notes, "Faculty scholarship and publication are critical for the success of Ambrose as a centre of higher learning in Canada, and I am delighted by the involvement of our professors in important international conferences of this kind." English Professor Makes Good Use of Sabbatical Time Associate Professor of English Literature Dr Rita Dirks Heath was on sabbatical from January 1 to July 1, 2011. At the beginning of January she presented a paper at the Modern Language Association Congress (MLA) in Los Angeles - an annual conference where thousands of literature and modern languages scholars meet together. Her paper explored the use of Mennonite Low German in Miriam Toews's A Complicated Kindness, the 2004 novel that won Canada's Governor General Award. At the end of June, Rita was in Dublin, Ireland, at The New Europe at the Crossroads Conference, where she presented a paper on the integration of Mennonites into mainstream Canadian culture as represented, again, in the novels of Miriam Toews. In between conferences, she wrote a twenty-page article for the journal Canadian Literature; presented a paper at the Ambrose Research Conference; acted as external reader for an interdisciplinary Winter 2011 anthem 4 master's thesis at Regent College; and went to England, Wales, and Scotland with Dr Tim Heath's class, English 404 Literary Landscapes. During her sabbatical time, she found that she had been honoured by her alma mater, the University of Alberta, by having her name inscribed on the Excellence of Teaching wall there in recognition of an award for teaching she won while completing her doctoral work. Although now back at Ambrose fulltime and teaching a number of classes, she is continuing the work begun during her sabbatical by finishing an article for a book to be published next year, writing two papers for the 2012 MLA congress - this time on Virginia Woolf and Mikhail Bulgakov and writing proposals for two more conferences, one in Canada and one in Berlin. Dr Dirks Heath notes that the concept of scholarly sabbatical derives from the biblical principle of Sabbath: "A time set apart for renewal as a scholar, citizen, and teacher." Given her continued activity, she concludes, "Scholarly sabbaticals exist not for rest but to bring renewal, so I am grateful for the opportunity my sabbatical has given me to strengthen and deepen my scholarship in service of my teaching in the English program at Ambrose." Congratulations, Dr Dirks Heath, on your accomplishments! Murray Downey Lectureship Series February 15 to 16, 2012: My Heart. God's Passion. Aligning My Heart With God's. The Murray Downey Lectureship series is hosting guest speaker Sunder Krishnan. Come prepared to be challenged and inspired as Rev. Krishnan speaks on God's unchanging purpose for the world, and how you are to play your part in the drama of redemption. The lectures are free and open to the public. For more information: speaker@ambrose.edu Our company is committed to excellence, investing in the most advanced technology and talented people in the industry. For outstanding print and an exceptional customer service experience that will help to power your business forward. certified Victoria | Vancouver | Calgary | Edmonton | www.rhinoprintsolutions.com | 403.291.0405

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    Professor Brings International Experience to the Classroom Dr David Peat joined the education faculty in August of this year following an already varied career which has taken him to places like Singapore, Kuwait, and Qatar, as well as the Yukon and other areas of Canada. He spent a number of years teaching in the Canadian public school system before returning to university to obtain a Master of Education degree and his PhD. Also during this time he qualified as a reading clinician, and became a chartered psychologist. Armed with these new skills he worked extensively with children with special educational needs, both directly in the classroom and at the administrative level designing and developing programs and services. Although he initially carried out this work in Canada, in 1997 he and his family moved overseas. In Kuwait he worked in a hospital setting with families overcoming serious challenges arising from the development of a disabling condition, or suffering from anxiety, depression, anger, grief, and behavioural issues related to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Although in the Kuwaiti context the trauma was primarily the result of war, children and families are equally prone to the same manifestations of distress as the result of a natural disaster. Working with ActionAid International, Dr Peat was able to spend time in the Maldives following the 2004 tsunami, training front-line workers offering support to traumatized children in that region. Not all of our education graduates will work in a Middle-Eastern context, or in a region affected by a disaster as broad Teachers don't have all the answers, but we can be Salt and Light to the lives of our students. and devastating as the tsunami, but even in the Canadian context they are likely to come across refugees from war-torn areas of the world, or those who have suffered other forms of trauma during their short lifetimes. Dr Peat's experience with children in these situations positions him well to assist Ambrose students as they prepare for some of the special needs these children will have in the classroom. Culturally, moving to the Middle East required a shift in perception of the accepted western norm of dress and behavior and it gave him valuable insight into the lives and culture of the FACULTY profile Associate Professor of Education David Peat spent a number of years overseas. Sharing his experiences with students brings a new dimension to classroom instruction. Kuwaiti and Qatari peoples. In Singapore the cultural differences may not have been as extreme, but it was still a very different situation than North America. These experiences help him to prepare Ambrose students for a unique feature of our Education degree: an optional postcertification international placement, with partial funding available from Ambrose. The placement provides valuable teaching experience in a non-North American context. "Being able to take advantage of this overseas experience allows the student to understand that the living conditions we take for granted in the west are only experienced by a very small proportion of the world's population. Teachers don't have - and don't need to have - all the answers, but we can be Salt and Light to the lives of our students," notes Peat, going on to add that the experience can help give students an increased understanding of place and help them to identify if their calling is to an overseas ministry or to a home-based situation in Canada. With such a rich background to draw from as he develops the educators of tomorrow at Ambrose, Dr Peat is a welcome addition to the education faculty and brings a new dimension to the program. Winter 2011 anthem 5

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    ALUMNI profile Taking the Choir on the Road and the Autobahn, and the Motorway, and the Superstrada... Brenda Quantz, nee Wheaton, is a graduate of Canadian Nazarene College (CNC). She arrived in Winnipeg (home of CNC at that time) from Amherst, Nova Scotia in January of 1972. She met her husband Don that year (Don is the Program Chair for Music at Ambrose and Director of the Chamber Choir) and says she has been following him around the globe ever since! They moved to Calgary in 1995 with their children Krista and Matthew. Natasha was born in Calgary and will graduate from grade 12 this year. Matt has been studying and teaching in Korea for the past five years. Sadly, their daughter Krista died of cancer in 1998. Since moving to Calgary Brenda has worked at Mount Royal University and is currently the Administrative Assistant to the Chair of General Education. On a number of occasions Brenda has been able to accompany Don on choir tours to Europe. She has travelled to England, Scotland, Wales, Germany, Austria, Italy, Austria, and Hungary with tours; the groups have typically numbered approximately 20 students, faculty, and staff. We asked Brenda for her impressions of the tours: Each trip has been a smorgasbord of experiences and each trip has left me with memories that will last a lifetime. I'll never forget travelling to Great Britain, my first time overseas, and landing in Scotland. Winter 2011 anthem 6 Travelling with students and sensing the excitement they bring every day is exhilarating, exhausting and rewarding! I'd never seen grass so green! Hearing the choir sing in massive stone cathedrals or small chapels was a thrill that has never lessened over the years. Helping prepare stew in the backyard of a small church in Hajdúhadház, Hungary, and later enjoying it with the local congregation is another highlight hard to forget. We couldn't speak their language nor they ours, but somehow we CNC graduate Brenda Quantz has travelled extensively with choir tours over the years. communicated. A few highlights from our recent trip to Italy: a night walk through Rome, enjoying cappuccino at Mac Cafe at the train station, attending church services with fellow Christians, singing for our supper in Sermione, hearing that one of our couples got engaged in Vienna on a gondola, and coming around a corner and seeing the Leaning Tower of Pisa for the first time. Each experience has left indelible marks on my mind. Unforgettable moments! Each trip has been different and each came with its own challenges and thrills. Why is this opportunity so important for students? Travelling with students and sensing the excitement they bring every day is exhilarating, exhausting and rewarding! Hearing them express their respect for history, sharing their wonder at the beauty and majesty of the countryside, and watching them share their faith through song and testimony helped me see with new eyes all that God has given us. I'm usually so tired when I return, I say I'll probably never go again but after about two weeks I start hoping the director will allow me to tag along next time! Thank you, Brenda, for your support of the Ambrose travel study programs!

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    STUDENT profile Reflections on an English Adventure cup of tea at the Eagle and Child A pub in Oxford where the Inklings gathered. Holding a first edition of Lyrical Ballads by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Stonehenge at sunrise while reading excerpts from Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy. Experiencing Shakespeare's As You Like It at the Globe Theatre and Les Miserables at the Queen's Theatre in London. These are just some of the experiences described by third year English Literature student Michelle Moody. She was a participant in the recent trip to England organized as part of English 404 Literary Landscapes: Travel Studies in Great Britain. Offered every other year to all Ambrose students meeting the prerequisites, or with the permission of the department, the trip takes students to a number of different places in Great Britain. The course provides academic credit to students upon successful completion of a number of exercises during the trip and a research paper completed on their return. Commenting on the trip, Michelle noted, "I have been travelling England vicariously for many years through the literature I have read and studied, but never before had the opportunity to embark upon my own adventures to the places I have imagined. My decision to participate in the English literature travel study program at Ambrose is one that I will never regret. Through my engagement in this travel study, an abundance of opportunities were presented to me and the adventures that I previously dreamt of became a reality." Travelling in May, an uncertain month "... the door was opened for me to examine and view literature and the world I live in from a new perspective." for weather in England, the group enjoyed good weather, delightful scenery, and many experiences that shed light on the context in which some of England's best-known authors wrote. Grasmere, situated in the Lake District in North-Western England, was home to poet William Wordsworth and the trip participants were able to visit the Jerwood Centre which houses a large archive of British Romanticism material, including a significant number of first editions. Access to the collection is only available by appointment, yet even Third year English literature student Michelle Moody reflects on her trip to England this summer. a visiting researcher would not be able to recreate the immersive four-day experience that the archive's curator Jeff Cowton and Dr Tim Heath, who teaches English 404, create for students on the Ambrose travel study venture. For Michelle, the opportunity to take this trip with friends who share similar passions and the knowledgeable Ambrose professors was "irresistible." She comments that her expectations of the trip were far exceeded by her experiences. When asked about the benefits of a travel study trip such as this, Michelle's response was unequivocal: "My time in England reinforced my understanding of why travel studies are such an important opportunity for students. Throughout my time in England, the door was opened for me to examine and view literature and the world I live in from a new perspective and influenced not only the way I interpret and read literature, but also the way I write. I was given opportunities that would have truly been impossible if not for my position as part of the travel study group from Ambrose, and these opportunities have enriched my post-secondary education." A fine endorsement, indeed, of the value of travel study programs. Winter 2011 anthem 7

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    LIONS athletics Winter 2011 anthem 8 Ambrose Lions Season Preview The 2011-12 sports season at Ambrose University College has begun and hopes are high for the coming year. With many returning players and a number of new players, the Ambrose Lions will be a tough team to beat - in every sport. Volleyball The men's and women's volleyball teams kicked off the year with identical 3-0 records with wins over the Prairie Pilots, the Canadian University College Aurora, and the St. Mary's Lightning in Alberta Colleges Athletics League (ACAL) action. The women's team has nine returning players, while the men's team has just four, but both teams are in a good position to build upon last year's success. Phil Wideman returns for his third season as head coach of the women's team, while Mike Dandenault, a former Lions men's volleyball MVP (2009) joins the men's team as their new bench boss. Both coaches took their teams to Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference (ACAC) tournaments to begin the year and showed that they are not far off from moving up to the next level.

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