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Rhino Times - 2016-09-22
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2016-09-22 00:00:00
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    Vol. IV No. 38 Greensboro, North Carolina www.rhinotimes.com Thursday, September 22, 2016 TRUMP & CLINTON STUMP THE TRIAD By Scott D. Yost Dearth of Nurses Ails County Schools plus Under The Hammer, Uncle Orson Reviews Everything AND MORE

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    2 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | www.rhinotimes.com The Weekly Hammer THE WEEKLY Hammer Presidential by John Hammer Editor I attended the Hillary Clinton for president rally at UNCG on Thursday, Sept. 15 and the Donald Trump for president rally at High Point University on Tuesday, Sept. 20, so I thought a little Rallies Face Off compare and contrast might be fun. I was impressed with how similar the two events were. Neither was anything like the Trump rally held at the Greensboro Coliseum Special Events Center in June, which was a pretty raucous affair. That was back in the day when Trump was coming out before overfl ow crowds and letting it rip. He had a few notes but mainly said whatever popped into his head. Both Trump and Hillary Clinton read their speeches from teleprompters. Trump had a few more asides than Hillary Clinton but both mainly stuck to the script. Hillary Clinton spoke for about 20 minutes and Trump for about 25. The biggest difference, other than the speeches themselves, may have been that Hillary Clinton started a few minutes early and Trump started an hour late. An hour is long time to keep people waiting, and no explanation was given. The security at the Trump rally was much tighter than at the Hillary Clinton rally. For Hillary Clinton I had to empty my pockets and they looked in my camera bag. For Trump I had to take my camera out of the bag, turn it on and show the guard a photo. They dumped everything out of both bags I was carrying, looked through my wallet for some reason and left everything in a pile on the table while they wanded me. I thought the security for presidential rallies would be fairly similar but that was not the case. Another big difference was in the way the media was treated inside. At the Hillary Clinton rally you had to walk into the cordoned off media area and couldn’t leave, even an hour before the event started, without being escorted by a campaign worker or, in my case, for some reason two. They let me out to take a photo of Mayor Nancy Vaughan and other local dignitaries in the audience but then I had to immediately get back in the media area, which had no opening. You actually had to walk out into the hall and come back into the room by a different door. There was no doubt that they didn’t want any media types escaping and mixing in with the crowd, but I don’t (continued on next page)

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | RHINO TIMES 3 face off table of CONTENTS 2 WEEKLY HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 5 COUNCIL VOTES TO RELEASE TWO MORE BODY-CAM VIDEOS BY JOHN HAMMER 7 LOCATION JUST ONE OF UNKNOWNS FOR ANIMAL SHELTER BY SCOTT D. YOST 9 TRUMP AT HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY BY JOHN HAMMER 11 HILLARY CLINTON STUMPS AT UNCG BY JOHN HAMMER 12 DEARTH OF NURSES IS WHAT AILS COUNTY SCHOOLS BY SCOTT D. YOST 14 GUILFORD COUNTY PARKS: THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT BY SCOTT D. YOST 17 UNCLE ORSON BY ORSON SCOTT CARD 25 YOST COLUMN BY SCOTT D. YOST 39 UNDER THE HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 4 RHINO SHORTS 15-16 PUZZLE ANSWERS 19 REAL ESTATE 20 NYT CROSSWORD 21 CHILDREN’S SCHEDULE 23 SUDOKU 23 THE SOUND OF THE BEEP 28 NEWS OF THE WEIRD 33 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 38 EDITORIAL CARTOON (continued from previous page) know why. At the Trump rally, the media could wander around before the event unescorted, although I did get told twice I had to move. Once I was in an area near the stage and they actually fenced off an area so I was the only one inside. I knew that wouldn’t last, but later I was sitting in the High Point University VIP area with permission of a vice president of High Point University and a campaign worker came and told me I had to leave because the Secret Service had complained. Evidently in the minds of the Secret Service there is no way someone could be part of the media and a VIP. After that I went out on the fl oor, which was fi lled mainly with students who were too busy taking selfies to care about an old guy in their midst. So my experiences at the two events was different because for Hillary Clinton I was with the press and for Trump I was with the people. But another aspect of that is that they had made the venue for the Hillary Clinton rally so small that even the press area wasn’t far away from the stage, and the press area extended down one side of the room where you could be beside the stage. At the Trump rally the press area was way in the back of the room. In fact, you might think that Trump didn’t like the media very much judging from where the campaign placed them. It’s a little odd when you think of how the two parties are perceived, but at the Hillary Clinton rally the VIPs were put right in front of the stage, with Vaughan and city councilmembers on a front row. At the Trump rally the VIPs were behind the speaker or off to the side, and in front of the stage, in the prime spots, were regular folks who had arrived early. One thing about both rallies that I think bodes well for the area is that people were polite. Even the guards dumping all my stuff out on the table were polite about the whole deal. It’s fun being a battleground state with the candidates making frequent appearances. Cover: Hillary Clinton at UNCG and Donald Trump at High Point University. Photos by John Hammer. More photos pages 8 and 10 PUBLISHER Roy Carroll EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John Hammer managing editor ELAINE HAMMER GENERAL MANAGER Joann Zollo creative director ANTHONY COUNCIL county editor SCOTT D. YOST contributing editor ORSON SCOTT CARD cartoonist GEOF BROOKS advertising consultants MICK HAYWOOD ABBY SCHMUCKER TYE SINGLETON 216 West Market Street, Greensboro NC 27401 P.O. Box 9023, Greensboro NC 27429 | (336) 763-4170 (continued on page 11) (336) 763-2585 fax | sales@rhinotimes.com (continued | www.rhinotimes.com on page 12)

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    4 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | www.rhinotimes.com R HINOSHORTS The next Rhino Times Schmoozefest is Thursday, Sept. 29 from 6 to 8 p.m. at The W on Elm in downtown Greensboro, 324 S. Elm St. Business professionals who sign in and wear a name tag are invited to enjoy free beer, wine and hors d’oeuvres. And with kids back in school, it’s just a matter of time before the holidays. The Rhino Times is asking loyal schmoozers to help make Christmas special this year for the 470 children in Guilford County foster care by bringing an unwrapped toy for a child or a gift card for a teen to Schmoozefests through November. Tax-deductible donations can also be made out to Celebrate the Children, the organization that will distribute the presents. Guilford County Board of Education member Amos Quick must have been shocked when he opened the News & Record on Thursday, Sept. 15 to find out that he is now a state representative. No doubt, Dist. 58 state Rep. Chris Sgro was shocked also. As much as the N&R wants to make Quick a state representative, newspapers don’t have that power. Quick is running unopposed for the seat held by the late Ralph Johnson, but he hasn’t been elected, much less sworn into office. Quick chose to finish out his term on the Board of Education – an admirable decision and one that few elected officials make. They run for higher office all the time and resign the position they were elected to serve. Quick chose not to do that. Barring some unforeseen circumstances, Quick will be elected on Nov. 8, will be sworn into office in January and then he will be a state representative. Quick has been a conscientious and thoughtful member of the school board and no doubt will serve the people with the same good-natured diligence in Raleigh, but he’s not there yet. It was déjà vu all over again on Friday when I stopped at the Sheetz on Battleground across from Marshall Free House to top off my tank. I had three-quarters of a tank, but like half the other people on the road I thought I might as well fill up. I’m not sure whether I filled up or not; I got 5.6 gallons, which is about right. Then, not just my pump but all the pumps cut off and an announcement came over the public address system that Sheetz was out of gas. I was taken back to my college days in the spring of 1974 when the gas crisis was at its height and the Duke rugby team played in the Mardi Gras rugby tournament in New Orleans. We traveled down there in five cars and all made it, but we saw a lot of cars parked at gas stations along I-85 waiting for them to open. If you timed it wrong you could be stuck for days. It’s the last time I remember being at a gas station that had run out of gas. This shortage was caused by a leak in the gas line, not by OPEC trying to raise prices, but the result is much the same. I’m feeling old this week, not that I have more aches and pains than usual, but Thursday I was on the UNCG campus and Tuesday on the High Point University campus, so I’ve spent a lot more time around college students than in my normal week, and they are all so young. In my mind it wasn’t that long ago that I was a college student, and in geological time it wasn’t, because what is 40 years to a rock. I was talking to a couple of guys making a documentary for Sky News, a British news network, at the Trump rally who had arrived in North Carolina for the first time two days earlier. They asked me about the state and how I liked living here. I don’t think I was the first North Carolinian they had questioned because one of them asked me, “Have you lived here all your life and do you love living here?” like they were anticipating my answers. I said I did love living here but I had also lived in Washington, DC, and Lisbon, which caused them to scratch their heads. I think they had decided that people never left North Carolina and thought it was great because they didn’t know any better. I also had fun explaining the reality of North Carolina politics versus what they had been reading in the mainstream media. Of course, a lot of folks would disagree with my version of the reality, but at least they heard something different. Talking to those guys about North Carolina made me think of the trip the Muse and I made to Nashville, Tennessee, a couple of weeks ago. We were too early for the truly spectacular fall scenery in the mountains, but it’s hard to drive through that part of the state and not be struck by the beauty. North Carolina has a tremendous amount of natural beauty and so far we’ve managed not to mess it up too much. It’s certainly one of the reasons so many people really do love living here. At Tuesday’s City Council meeting, the rezoning request for land along Lake Brandt and Trosper roads was postponed for 30 days. Controversial rezoning cases seem to always be postponed at least once, while the opponents attempt to get organized, the proponents try to work out a deal or both. It made me wonder if every rezoning of any size in other cities faces serious opposition or if Greensboro is different. It would be a good project to research on a slow day, if there is such a thing in the news business. Some rezoning requests are clearly bad ideas, but it is rare to see a major rezoning that doesn’t face serious opposition. North Carolina Lt. Gov. Dan Forest and Chairman of the Guilford County Board of Commissioners Jeff Phillips helped cut the ribbon for the opening of Gate City Charter Academy on Flemingfield Road Tuesday.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | RHINO TIMES 5 Council Votes To Release Two More Body-Cam Videos by John Hammer It’s always a mistake to bet on a short City Council meeting. The meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 20 had the Lake Brandt and Trosper Road rezoning on the agenda that was going to take some time, but that was postponed for 30 days, leaving the City Council with one resolution about bias-based policing that had sparked a lively debate at a work session, mainly because all the councilmembers were trying to be more supportive than the others. And, in fact, the public portion of the Sept. 20 meeting went pretty quick – two hours. But it was preceded by a nearly two-and-a-half-hour closed session that even Mayor Nancy Vaughan said she didn’t see coming when she apologized to those in the Council Chambers for keeping them waiting for over two hours. The result of the closed session was that the City Council voted 7 to 2 to release two police body-worn camera videos of an incident that happened on June 18, which most councilmembers knew nothing about until shortly before the meeting. City Manager Jim Westmoreland said the videos would be released at 1 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 26. In three years, the City Council has released one police body-cam video, so releasing two more is historic. This video is being released under the policy passed by the City Council in June that will be superseded by a new state law on police body-cam videos that goes into effect on Oct. 1 and takes away the City Council’s right to release videos and gives that power to North Carolina Superior Court judges. If it takes two hours to decide to release the videos from one event, the City Council should be thankful that the new state law is going into effect, because as more are released there will be pressure to start releasing even more. In this case, no one was injured, no complaint was fi led and very few in the city had any idea that an incident had taken place. The city policy maintains that the police body-cam videos are a part of a police offi cer’s personnel record and can only be released with the permission of the offi cer, or if the city manager and the City Council determine that releasing the video is “essential to maintaining public confi dence in the administration of city services.” Since city councilmembers – who are far more plugged in to what is happening in the community than the average citizen – didn’t even know about the incident three months after it happened, it seems like a tough argument to make that this incident was damaging public confi dence in the Police Department. One of the reasons that that Councilmembers Mike Barber and Tony Wilkins said they voted against the release is that releasing the second video without the permission of the offi cer based on maintaining public confi dence wasn’t necessary and could cause problems. Two offi cers were involved in the incident. Offi cer Travis Cole, who has since resigned from the Police Department, and a second unnamed female offi cer. Cole gave permission to release his body-cam video; the female offi cer did not. Both Barber and Wilkins said they believed the video from Cole’s camera should be released, but not the video from the female offi cer, who, according to everyone who spoke, behaved appropriately and professionally. The discussion was supposed to start with a brief description of what happened by Police Chief Wayne Scott. However, shortly after Scott started speaking, Councilmember Justin Outling interrupted and said he didn’t think it was appropriate for Scott to give a description of the incident, which (continued on page 35)

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    6 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | www.rhinotimes.com Friday Evening at the Central Carolina Fair Photos by Elaine Hammer. More photos at rhinotimes.com

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | RHINO TIMES 7 Location Just One of Many Unknowns for Animal Shelter by Scott D. Yost So far, when it comes to building a new Guilford County Animal Shelter, the discussions about the size, cost, location and all other aspects of the shelter have been between Guilford County commissioners, staff and county consultants. However, there’s a growing chorus of loud new voices chiming in on the project: The area’s large community of animal welfare advocates is now speaking up, asking questions and making its own wishes for the proposed new facility known. At the Guilford County Animal Services Advisory Board meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 7, speakers from the fl oor, as well as Animal Services board members, had a lot of thoughts on the shelter and its location, practices and policies. And on Monday, Sept. 12, at a Halting Overpopulation and Preventing Euthanasia (HOPE) meeting at the Benjamin Branch of the Greensboro Public Library, animal lovers and representatives of area animal rescue and welfare organizations also expressed their thoughts on the new shelter. That group meets about once a month and those meetings include a good cross-section of animal advocates in Guilford County. Currently, the 900-pound question in the room is whether or not the Greensboro City Council is going to approve a rezoning request from Guilford County – something that’s needed for the county to build a shelter on the county-owned site next to the Guilford County Agricultural Center on the 3300 block of Burlington Road in Greensboro. The majority of county commissioners want to see the shelter built at that location. However, the District 1 and District 2 city councilmembers who represent that section of east Greensboro are avidly opposed to putting the shelter there, and they have some support from other members of the City Council – though other council members are either for it or haven’t made up their minds. But location is only one question regarding the shelter. Nearly all the other issues – such as the shelter’s size, design, cost, policies, non-profi t affi liations and more – are also up in the air. Guilford County Commissioner Justin Conrad, the chairman of the county’s newly formed Animal Services board, said he appreciates the free-fl owing input that’s now coming in from animal lovers. Conrad said he has started seeing a lot of emails regarding the shelter, and he’s also hearing from those who come to Animal Services meetings to offer input as speakers from the fl oor. Conrad said that, when he served on the Guilford County Board of Public Health for six years, and chaired it for two of those years, there was only one person who ever came to speak from the fl oor and that person only spoke occasionally. However, at the last Guilford County Animal Services board meeting, over 30 people came to watch the proceedings and many of those spoke up on various issues. At the September committee meeting, Conrad had to add time at the end of the meeting for speakers from the fl oor since so many people wanted to voice their views. Conrad said he thinks the growing input from multiple sources is a good thing and he added that Guilford County can benefi t from that as it moves forward with the shelter process. “In this area, there’s a group of very engaged volunteers and others who care deeply about the animals,” Conrad said. “The people who are passionate about animals are very passionate – and that’s a good thing. I appreciate that.” He said he always welcomes participation by the community and at the Animal Services board meeting earlier this month he pointed out to the board members and the audience that there will be plenty of time for people to submit their ideas. “I wanted to make sure that people understood how early in the process we are,” Conrad said this week. “We are very, very, very early in this process.” Conrad said a lot of things are currently up in the air because many previous staff conversations on the shelter and its policies took place with former Animal Services Director Logan Rustan at the center of the process. Rustan left Guilford County government abruptly in May, just a few months after being named director of Animal Services. In July, the county hired Animal Services Director Drew Brinkley. Brinkley was the operations manager for the Orange County Animal Shelter before accepting the job with Guilford County. Conrad said Brinkley clearly has his own thoughts on the new shelter project. He said he expects Brinkley’s HARDWOOD LAMINATE 855-FLOOR-50 Mobile Showroom WE COME TO YOU Serving North & South Carolina since 1960 Orange County background to show itself in the new Animal Shelter’s policies and practices. Guilford County Deputy Manager Clarence Grier, who’s overseeing the new shelter initiative, also worked for Orange County before he took the job in Guilford County, and Grier has praised how the shelter in that county was run. Conrad said, “I think you are going to see different programs in the new shelter – maybe some that come specifi cally from Orange County, which has a shelter that is really held in high regard.” Grier said he’s also starting to hear more from interested citizens about what they’d like to see include in the (continued on page 30) LOWEST PRICES PERIOD 3/4” Solid Hardwood A + 1- Year Interest Free Financing** ** with approved credit $ 4.99 *see sqft. 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    8 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | www.rhinotimes.com Donald Trump Speaks at HPU Photos by John Hammer

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | RHINO TIMES 9 Trump at High Point University by John Hammer The Donald Trump rally at High Point University on Tuesday, Sept. 20 was by Trump standards a fairly inauspicious event. Earlier in the campaign you could have expected Trump to make at least one statement that would have the mainstream media all atwitter. At this rally, which was scheduled to start at noon, but where Trump didn’t speak until 1 p.m., the candidate did what political pundits have been saying he needed to do and stayed on message. Trump read his speech from the teleprompters with, for Trump, very few asides. He stuck to his themes: He’s going to bring jobs back, cut taxes “drastically” and protect the country from radical Islamic terrorism. The crowd got going a couple of times, but it was nothing like the Trump rally in Greensboro in June when Trump couldn’t get the crowd to stop chanting so he could continue his speech. The pundits are saying that what Trump needs to do is act presidential, and he did. Even the speakers before him were much more subdued. Chairman of the North Carolina Republican Party Robin Hayes always does a good job at this type of event, chatting with the crowd and introducing speakers. Hayes is a likable guy in person and is the same in front of a couple thousand people. The Republican candidate for North Carolina attorney general, state Sen. Buck Newton, was the only statewide Republican candidate to speak. Clarence Henderson – who participated in the Greensboro sit-ins at Woolworth in 1960 – gave the invocation, and Guilford County Sheriff BJ Barnes, with sheriffs from nearby counties standing behind him, spoke briefl y. Trump, as would be expected, talked about the recent radical Islamic terrorist attacks and how that proves what he has been saying all along – about the need to vet immigrants – was correct. He said that, as president, only refugees who could be fully vetted and wanted to be a part of the country would be allowed to immigrate. He said that Hillary Clinton talked worse about his supporters than she does about radical Islamic terrorists. Trump said, “She called my supporters deplorable and irredeemable,” and he asked if she had ever called radical Islamic terrorists deplorable and irredeemable. He answered his own question by saying that she hadn’t, because she won’t call them radical Islamic terrorists. And he added, “Anyone who cannot name our enemy is not fi t to lead this country.” He said the current problems in Iraq, Syria and Libya were the result of her policies as secretary of state. He also predicted that she would change her policies over the next couple of days, and Hillary Clinton has already admitted that vetting refugees is not a bad idea. Trump, of course, said he was going to build a wall and Mexico was going to pay for it, and that he was going to make great trade deals and bring jobs back. He talked about how many jobs North Carolina had lost because of NAFTA, which Bill Clinton signed and Hillary supported. He also talked about rebuilding the infrastructure of the country, which he said is crumbling. Trump made a pitch to the African- American voters saying that the Democrats come around every “four years, promise you things and nothing happens.” He asked: “What do you have to lose” by supporting Trump? He fi nished by saying that he would make America wealthy again, strong again, safe again and great again. It was interesting to watch the journalists from the national media who follow Trump around, because once he launched into his prepared remarks they quit paying much attention. They have heard the speech numerous times and had transcripts, so they didn’t need to pay attention. Trump started out campaigning like no one had in years, not with a prepared stump speech but by going out and talking to the crowd and saying whatever was on his mind. Now he is campaigning a lot more like every other candidate does – reading speeches from a teleprompter – but it will be surprising, in the fi nal weeks of the campaign, if he doesn’t revert back to more of his old style to get the voters fi red up. It was a good speech, hitting the points he needed to hit, but it was nothing like the rallies he was holding in the spring where the crowds went wild. He’s like a football team that has been winning by throwing long on every down, fi nds itself ahead in the fourth quarter and starts running up the middle every play. Sometimes that works and sometimes it doesn’t. If it starts not working you can expect Trump to start throwing long again. But for right now he doesn’t have to take the risk, and surprisingly he isn’t. UPHOLD UPHOLD THE THE LAW. LAW. ‘‘ ‘‘ RESPECT RESPECT THE THE PEOPLE. PEOPLE. TL008_8.5x5.5_ad.indd 1 TL008_8.5x5.5_ad.indd 1 6/28/16 1:31 PM 6/28/16 1:31 PM

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    10 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 22, 2016 | www.rhinotimes.com Hillary Clinton at UNC-Greensboro Photos by John Hammer

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