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Rhino Times - 2017-07-06
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-07-06 00:00:00
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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, July 6, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 11 architect (continued from previous page) which begins: “The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards estimates as of the end of 2013 that there are 105,847 licensed architects in the United States. Of these, 2,006, or about 2%, are self-identified as African American, and listed in the Directory of African American Architects; only 343 of these are African American women. ‘If there is any kind of profession that’s gotten away with a kind of benign neglect of diversifying itself over the course of last 30 years, it’s architecture,’ says Ted Landsmark,” president of Boston Architectural College from 1997 to 2014. The battle over black architects gained new momentum in May when former 20-year veteran commissioner Alston joined the board. He has stated emphatically several times at meetings since his return that county staff clearly isn’t looking hard enough for black architects. He said purchasing and facilities officials, along with MWBE recruitment staff, must be more diligent in seeking out black and other minority architects. The current battle is reminiscent of a similar one the board had years ago over a lack of minorities being hired by Emergency Services. Guilford County Commissioner Alan Perdue served as Guilford County Emergency Services director before he retired from that job and was elected to the Board of Commissioners. At one point, about eight years ago, Perdue came before the board for approval of a new class of about a dozen EMS responders who had been selected for the job and had successfully completed the coursework – and none of them were black. At that time, Alston and Coleman raked Perdue over the coals for his department selecting a new group of employees with no minorities when, finally, one commissioner asked Perdue how many African-Americans had applied for the job and Perdue responded that none had. Despite the long history of this type of dispute, Barnes said he wants the current spat to be resolved so the old jail renovation can move forward. “Right now, we’re in a holding pattern,” he said. Barnes said his department is doing the only thing it can: Moving staff out of the old jail so the renovation can begin whenever the county works out its architect issues. He said that, when and if an architect is approved, everything on his end will be ready. Barnes said that sheriff’s staff now in the old jail is moving into the old Register of Deeds office space on the bottom floor of the Guilford County Courthouse in Greensboro, and they will remain there until the renovation of the old jail is complete. Those workers include staff that handles foreclosures, lawsuits, concealed carry permits and many other legal services the department provides. Barnes said the sooner the renovation project is complete the better because citizens won’t like having those services in the courthouse one bit. “That’s going to be a pain for customers because there’s no parking and they have to go through metal detectors,” Barnes said. Not to mention that cell phones aren’t allowed in the courthouse. In 2012, there was talk of demolishing the old jail after a giant new 1,032-bed jail opened right next to it; however, demolition and debris removal costs could have been $1 million or higher. Eventually, the old jail will be the central hub for nearly all Sheriff’s Department services. Barnes said the Zenke building will be bulldozed “if the ghosts let them.” For years, the Zenke building has been known to be haunted. There are no known ghosts in the old jail. That site of the Zenke building will become a much-needed county parking lot. “The last time I heard anything, there was a need for 225 spaces – that’s the county’s need and mine combined,” Barnes said. “The parking lot there will have 175. My math says that’s 50 short.” Barnes also said he’s heard that state probation and parole services that are now “scattered all around” may be moved into the old jail and take up several floors. If that’s the case, he said, parking in the area will be an even bigger problem. Five years ago, the Guilford County Board of Commissioners voted for the county to sell a giant parking lot to the Kathleen Price Bryan Family YMCA. That valuable real estate is right across South Edgeworth Street from the old jail and the Zenke building. Barnes said that was one of the biggest blunders in county history, one the county is still paying for. “It was the stupidest thing in the world,” Barnes said of the sale of the property to the YMCA. At the time, nearly all of the county commissioners who approved the move knew that it was ill-advised but several commissioners stated privately to the Rhino Times that they were under a great deal of political pressure to sell the lot to the YMCA. Barnes said he doesn’t know what will happen if the county moves all the people into the old jail with insufficient parking. He added that it’s not his call. “You’ve heard me say,” Barnes said, “I don’t run the train, I don’t ring the bell – but let it run off the track, and see who catches hell.”

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    12 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 6, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Rhino School Salary List Leads to Jewell of a Debate over Conflict of Interest by Scott D. Yost The highest paid teacher on the Guilford County Schools (GCS) payroll, Mark Jewell, hasn’t worked for the school system since 2012, lives in Raleigh and currently heads up the North Carolina Association of Educators (NCAE) – a political action group that lobbies state legislators on statewide school concerns. In a list of school employees provided by GCS to the Rhino Times, published last month, Jewell was listed as “Tchr – NCAE VP” with a salary of $74,088. That brief notation in a long list of names and salaries raised some eyebrows among Guilford County officials and some school system officials who were unaware the agreement existed and who find it strange and concerning. The NCAE is a union that represents teachers and other educators statewide and advocates for goals such as higher teacher pay and more school funding from state and local governments. Days after the salary list appeared, Guilford County – which recently provided the school system north of $200 million in total school funding for fiscal 2017-2018 when school debt repayments are included – sent a request for clarification about the arrangement the school system has with the NCAE. Guilford County Manager Marty Lawing – apparently in response to commissioner concerns – sent the question to Guilford County Schools Chief Financial Officer Angie Henry. In a written response to the question, Henry first summarized the request for information she’d received: “REQUEST: Provide an explanation for NCAE VP Mark Jewell’s salary reflected in the Rhino Times. It appears higher than most teachers.” Henry followed with her response: “Mark Jewell is paid 12 months on the Master Teacher Salary schedule. Other teachers are paid 10 months. Guilford County Schools receives full reimbursement of Mr. Jewell’s salary and benefits from the NCAE.” Jewell has had this arrangement for years and it is set to continue for years as well. Jewell began teaching in Guilford County Schools in 1997 and went on to become the president of the Guilford County Association of Educators. In the summer of 2012, he was elected as NCAE vice president and left GCS for the job in Raleigh before being elected president of that group last year. His current two-year term as president ends on June 30, 2018. Some school board members didn’t know about the arrangement until the Rhino Times school salary list was published and some school and county officials are taken aback that the schools have made the arrangement with the political organization that works for and against certain candidates and causes. In the November 2016 election, every NCAE endorsement in a statewide race went to the Democratic contender. Guilford County Board of Education member Pat Tillman said the local chapter worked against his election to the school board. Voters may know the “apple cards” shaped like an apple that list the candidates the educator’s group is endorsing in school board races and other races. “They were absolutely against me,” Tillman said. “I wasn’t on that apple card. That is certainly a concern we have had – that there not be any proselytizing and promotion of candidates inside the schools.” He said that, of course, outside the workplace, educators like any other citizens are free to politic how they want, but he added that it’s strange to have an employee on the GCS payroll who campaigns to elect various candidates and works against others – even if the salary is reimbursed. “Awkward is the word,” Tillman said of the arrangement. Tillman said that he and other elected officials had a great many questions after the Rhino Times salary list was published with Jewell’s salary. Several Guilford County commissioners said the agreement has been a topic of discussion among county officials who wanted to know why the county’s highest paid teacher works full time for a statewide political group. Commissioner Justin Conrad said he became aware of the arrangement when another county official pointed it out to him. “I don’t understand it,” Conrad said. He said he’s still learning about the arrangement and said he had a number of questions about it and was curious to know whether the school system has other such deals with employees. Commissioner Alan Branson said it struck him as odd and noted that Jewell came before the commissioners as a speaker from the floor at a June meeting and spoke on the need for the Board of Commissioners to increase school funding. Commissioner Hank Henning said that, if his understanding of the arrangement is correct, he has serious concerns about it even if the NCAE does reimburse Guilford County Schools all of the money Jewell receives from the school system. Henning said the NCAE reimbursing the schools for Jewel’s salary doesn’t change the fact that it’s a conflict of interest. He said the highly political nature of the NCAE job is a concern given that the organization endorses candidates in school board races and works against other candidates. “I don’t think that’s right – you’re literally hiring a guy to be involved with a campaign,” Henning said. “It’s just too close for comfort for me. He’s on the payroll of the schools and they were out campaigning against some members who currently sit on the school board. I don’t want to be hyperbolic about it, but that doesn’t seem right to me.” Henning said that if GCS wants to hire a lobbyist to advocate for the Guilford County school system’s causes with state legislators, that would be more understandable. He said that, for instance, the City of High Point hires a lobbyist to promote that city’s interests. “I have no problem with that,” Henning said. He added that this is a different type of arrangement. In addition to (continued on next page)

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, July 6, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 13 salary (continued from previous page) the conflict of interest from Jewell and his organization working to unseat some school board members and state legislators, Henning said, it’s just simply odd to have a GCS employee being paid by the taxpayers who are getting reimbursed by a political organization. “He works for a different organization and is still on the school’s books,” Henning said. “He’s on the school’s payroll but working for a political organization that is paying back the schools.” When and if Jewell returns to the school system, he will be allowed to pick up benefits where they left off and he is guaranteed a job with the schools. “We don’t let our own staff take off and keep paying them for years,” Henning said of the 2,200 Guilford County employees he helps oversee. “I’m all for consistency. If one has a right to be on the public payroll and we reimburse them then everyone should be allowed to that. We don’t pay people to hold positions – we pay people to serve the public.” A statement from GCS on the arrangement noted that this is a common practice among state school systems when a top NCEA official is elected from a school system. This is the first time such an arrangement Guilford County Schools has made for an NCAE officer. “We have not had other employees who served in this role,” the statement read. Jewell said this week that there’s nothing nefarious going on and the school system isn’t out any money. He said his salary is fully reimbursed and he will not get benefits from GCS until he returns to a job there. “I am on loan,” Jewell said. “It is at no cost for the schools.” In the meantime, he said, benefits from the school system such as his retirement privileges are “frozen.” Jewell said that, while there is state level politicking by the NCAE, the state branch doesn’t weigh in on local school board races. Instead, he said, that’s left up to the local chapters. “We’re separate,” Jewell said. “There is no collusion between the two. They operate independently.” Henning said he doesn’t buy the argument. “So that means I buy a car from a dealership and take it back, they may say, – oh your beef is not with us it’s with the national company,” Henning said. “It’s unbelievable logic to even try to sell that. It’s pretty much indefensible.” Jewell said that, while the NCAE does promote things that benefit school systems across the state, there are times when NCAE policy is a “different ends of the spectrum” from local school systems. Jewell said he plans to run for reelection as NCAE president in 2018, which would mean it could be 2020 before he returns to the GCS – if he chooses to do so at that time. Jewell said he had enjoyed teaching very much but he added that he also likes being in a position where he can help advance the cause of education statewide. “Obviously, you go into teaching to make a difference in the kids’ lives,” Jewell said. “But I love that I have a stronger voice of influence with the General Assembly.” He said it’s important work given that the state is 43rd nationally in per pupil spending. Jewell said one of his goals is returning the state to being number one in education in the Southeast, a position he said North Carolina held not all that many years ago. Jewell, who earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in elementary education from Marshall University, came to Guilford County from West Virginia in 1997 with most of the majority of his teaching career occurring at the elementary level as a fourth- and fifth-grade teacher. He spent 10 years teaching in West Virginia, before teaching for 16 years in the Guilford County school system, where he taught at Oak Hill Elementary in High Point and Murphey Traditional Academy in Greensboro. At both of those schools, Jewell was selected for a “Teacher of the Year” award. Jewell also worked as a lateral-entry specialist for the Guilford County Schools Human Resources Department, where he helped new teachers who enter the profession through the “alternative licensure pathways.” Jewell served on the Guilford Education Alliance as well as other local education groups and he is the former president of the Guilford County Association of Educators. He’s also served on the board of directors for both the North Carolina Association of Educators (NCAE) and the National Education Association. In April 2012, he was elected the NCAE vice president. The agreement between GCS and the NCAE reads “During the term of this agreement … Jewell will continue to be employed as a full time employee of GCS and will be paid by GCS commensurate with his qualifications and will include salary from State and local funds, longevity from State and local funds, FICA, estimated Worker’s Compensation insurance, Health, Dental and Life Insurance payments. GCS will not make payments to the Teachers and State Employees Retirement System.” It also states the NCAE will reimburse the county on a monthly basis and that Jewell is granted leave for “up to 100 percent of his employee time.” The agreement notes that GCS anticipates Jewell’s return to the school system and that GCS will assure him a teaching position or other position in the district but it does not guarantee any specific assignment. The most recent version of the contract was signed on May 5, 2016. aaf tank museum Vehicle Run Day SEE THEM MOVE, FEEL THEM TREMBLE & HEAR THEM ROAR! A variety of wheeled and tracked vehicles from the museum collection will be driven thru out the day indoors. Saturday, July 15 th Exhibition Times: 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. & 2:30 p.m. Admission: $12 Adults $10 under 12 & over 60 Under 4 FREE ENTER FOR A CHANCE TO WIN A RIDE IN A VEHICLE AAF Tank Museum 3401 US Highway 29, Danville, VA 24540 434-836-5323 • www.aaftankmuseum.com • 10am to 4pm Visit us at facebook.com/AAFTankmuseum

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    14 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 6, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Three Commissioners Fly To Columbus For County Cannabis Round Table by Scott D. Yost The National Association of Counties (NACo) annual convention each summer is usually held in an exciting place such as Hawaii or Las Vegas, and taxpayers sometimes question whether the county commissioners who attend those conferences are going for the knowledge or for the fun. However, this year there should be no question about that since the convention is in Ohio – the place John Denver once sang was “like being nowhere at all,” and of which he also remarked, “I spent a week there one day.” Despite that less than enticing lyrical description of the locale, three Democratic Guilford County commissioners – Skip Alston, Carlvena Foster and Kay Cashion – are making the trip this year on the taxpayer’s dime to attend the conference in Columbus Ohio, which runs from July 21 to July 24. Alston’s estimated expenses, at $1,935, are typical for the cost of commissioners making this trip: Registration is $505, his hotel stay is $895 and round-trip airfare is $535. The expenses for Cashion and Foster also total just over $1900 each for the conference. Alston, who’s been on many of these trips during his two decades on the board, said he and other commissioners get a great deal out of the conferences and he added that, in the end, the public benefits from better government. Commissioners have been attending conferences for years and talking about how citizens benefit. However, there are very few things that they’ve been able to point to and say, “This decisively is something from a NACo conference that improved Guilford County government.” About eight years ago, one commissioner did learn at a conference about a prescription drug discount card that was available free to residents in all member counties including Guilford County. County officials made that card available to citizens and that did create savings for some. “It’s about sharing ideas,” Alston said. “You get a chance to bounce ideas off of other people. Whether it’s social services or school issues, all those people have the same problems we have.” Alston also said the workshops and seminars are often highly relevant to what’s going on in Guilford County. “You share solutions,” Alston said. “Someone from California may say, ‘This is what we did,’ and you think, ‘Hey, that may work in Guilford County.’ When I go to the NAACP conference, it’s the same thing – we’re looking for ways to solve problems.” The five-time former chairman of the Board of Commissioners also said a NACo workshop was where he got schooled on the finer points of parliamentary procedure. “I learned a lot when I was chairman,” Alston said. “I went to one that was called, ‘How to Control an Aggressive Board.’” Alston said that one came in handy given the board’s cast of colorful characters when he was chairman. Alston didn’t name his longtime foe – former Republican Commissioner Billy Yow – but he may as well have. Alston also said the relationships formed with other county officials leads to more cooperation among county governments. He said that by participating on various committees, Guilford County commissioners provide input that can shape federal legislation and he added that Cashion was very active on NACo boards and committees. Out of those talks, NACo creates a legislative agenda that calls for changes in federal regulations, funding rules and other changes meant to benefit counties. NACo then uses its collective lobbying power to encourage legislators to make those changes come about. The schedule for the 2017 conference includes steering committees on many subjects from transportation to public safety to county pension systems and those help counties govern and manage their assets. Alston, who only rejoined the Board of Commissioners two months ago, isn’t on many NACo committees Cashion, however, chairs the Arts and Culture Commission and is vice chair of the Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee. She’s also a member of the Resilient Counties Advisory Board, the Telecommunications and Technology Steering Committee and the Large Urban Counties Caucus Steering Committee. That will presumably allow Guilford County’s voice in those areas to be heard. Foster, a former Guilford County Board of Education member, serves on NACo’s Human Services and Education Steering Committee. Guilford County Commissioner Alan Branson is on NACo’s Transportation Steering Committee and Public Lands Steering Committee. However, Branson had a family conflict and is unable to attend this year’s conference. There’s a full slate of workshops on cutting edge issues on the agenda including cyber security for county governments and the use of big data and artificial intelligence to help meet county goals. Of course, there will be some fun too as always. The kickoff party will be held one block from the Greater Columbus Convention Center at the North Market in Columbus, at which “more than 30 merchants offer a wide variety of fresh, local, authentic food, many of which will be serving specialties for NACo attendees to enjoy,” and where “A local band will add to the festive atmosphere.” Those festivities are followed by “NACo Night at the Ballpark,” featuring a baseball game between the Syracuse Chiefs and the Columbus Clippers. Monday night July 24 – the final night of the conference – is the big blowout party at a venue called “Express Live!” in Columbus, a place where Megadeth performed recently. Megadeth will probably not be the band for the NACo party. During the conference, there will be a tour of downtown revitalization (continued on page 40)

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    Page 15

    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, July 6, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 15 Uncle Orson Reviews Everything UNCLE ORSON Reviews Schmackary’s, by Orson Scott Card It was almost funny. Someone had told me that Schmackary’s in Manhattan made the best cookies in America. The store also did wonderful-weird things like allowing people to go online and order a bunch of cookies to be sent to the cast of any show on Broadway. (Maybe they include off-Broadway shows, too. I didn’t check.) Fragmentary Movies It sounded like great fun, but I wasn’t going to send an order of cookies to anyone else before I sampled some myself. My wife and I plan to go to New York to see Dear Evan Hansen, which has been highly recommended by friends. I take personal recommendations of shows seriously, because going to Broadway and spending the money to see a lousy show is a serious waste of time and money. I have found, ever since walking out of a couple of shows so offensively stupid that I felt it was dangerous to my mental health to remain, that Broadway reviewers are not to be trusted, period. But when a good (and smart, and not stage-struck) friend tells me that Dear Evan Hansen is a terrific show, and his plot summary is encouraging, then yes, it’s worth the trip to Manhattan to see the play. But what if we had gone to see the musical Amelie because we loved the French movie by that name? I ordered the original cast album of Amelie and on our recent road trip we plunked it into our dashboard CD player and oh, what a sad, sad failure it was. Don’t misunderstand – everybody had good Broadway voices. Unfortunately, the famous Broadway voice that provided the inspiration for most of them was Ethel Merman, who was famous for having a foghorn voice that (in the days before individual amplification) could be heard in every corner of the theater. Not to mention that her voice could frighten horses in the street outside. So could these voices. But I don’t blame the actors for giving bombastic vocal performances. They were right in line with the music, which seemed to be inspired by the worst flaws in the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber. That means songs consisting of a lot of random mid-range notes forming no memorable melody, and then a sudden high note or two meant to make you think you’re hearing opera. And maybe it works, for audience members who’ve never heard good opera sung well. Anyway, the CD of Amelie ended up in a garbage can in a fast food restaurant somewhere between Dayton and Peoria. But we weren’t the only ones to find the score of Amelie tedious, without a single decent song. The show has already closed on Broadway. (continued on page 16) Tom Foolery CLEAN, SECURE, SAFE, INDOOR www.Beesafe.com on NC Highway 68 near I-40 • Loading dock available at the Battleground location Tom Foolery • All interior storage units are fully climate controlled • Sizes from 5’ x 5’ to 10’ x 30’ • Wine storage with temperature and humidity control • Wine storage units from 2’ x 2’ to 3’ x 6’ • Postal service available onsite at the Battleground location 3 GREAT LOCATIONS 1016 Battleground Avenue Greensboro, NC (336) 332-0123 4435 Jessup Grove Road Greensboro, NC (across from Proehlifi c Park) (336) 605-3202 NOW OPEN 704 Sunshine Way, Greensboro on NC Highway 68 near I-40 (336) 279-7100

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    16 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 6, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com uncle orson (continued from page 15) The miracle was that it somehow attracted enough backers and creative personnel to get staged on Broadway in the first place. Is it possible that people loved the French movie Amelie so much that they invested in the musical because a musical of Amelie sounded like a great idea? Here’s the thing: Making a great movie or book into “a musical” is no more a guarantee of a wonderful result than making a great musical or book into “a movie.” Look how many bad-to-mediocre musicals and movies have been made of Little Women. Great book, but completely unadaptable because it has a horrible structure: The book fails in the attempt to switch the male romantic lead in the last 15 minutes, and so do all the adaptations. Some stories can’t be adapted, and some that might be are adapted badly. That’s how it goes. But the thought of ordering Schmackary’s cookies for the cast of a show that stinketh a great stinking just doesn’t seem right. It’s true that the cast probably needs the cookies – I’m betting the cast of Hamilton has cookies every doggone night, while the cast of Amelie might never have received a single schmackary. Come to think of it, though, maybe there are New Yorkers who, taking pity on the cast of a bomb, sent them Speed Bump cookies out of charity. Rather like visiting someone injured in a freak accident, to show solidarity and suggest that maybe they should look more carefully to see if there’s water in the pool before jumping off a hotel roof. It’s the same reason why I think we need a Lilac Heart Award ceremony for good actors who gave valiant performances in movies so badly written that just saying the lines with a straight face deserves some kind of prize. However cool and highly recommended Schmackary’s was, however, they have the most phenomenally bad website I’ve ever seen. The first time I signed on to order cookies, I found that there were four vertical boxes, one of which was for ordering cookies to be shipped somewhere. I happen to live somewhere, so that seemed like the choice I wanted. As I moved my cursor to that box, the box grew at the base, revealing a white rectangle into which I was supposed to type the date I wanted it delivered. But when I moved my cursor down into that space, it disappeared. The box was still there, but the dateselection space was gone. I thought, maybe I should just click on the main box and it will take by Dave Coverly me somewhere else to enter that information. But no, clicking did nothing. I’d click, and then move the cursor to one side and the ship-it-somewhere box grew faint and the box I was now hovering over was highlighted. I couldn’t insert a date in that one, either. Nothing worked. Failure. When all your targets slip away like Lucy’s football whenever Charlie Brown tries to kick it, it becomes frustrating, and I may have muttered some phrases even more discouraged than “Good grief.” Today I tried to order cookies for a second time, and, to my relief, the previous screens didn’t even appear. It’s as if they completely redesigned the site in the past week. Oh good! cried I with joy. Now they’ve solved council (continued from page 7) runs First Tee of the Triad, a nonprofit organization that uses golf to teach life skills to economically disadvantaged children. Barber launched his political career winning a four-year term on the Guilford County Board of Commissioners in 2000, serving one year as chairman. He was defeated when he ran for a second term as a commissioner in 2004. In 2005, Barber won a seat on the City Council and served two terms before stepping down in 2009. After leaving the City Council, Barber moved to Spain for a year – talk about getting away from it all, that’s really getting away. When he returned from Spain and got back into the swing of things, Barber ran for an at-large seat on the City Council in 2013 and was reelected in 2015. Barber often doesn’t participate in the sometimes-heated City Council discussions, but when he does speak, he doesn’t mince words. While other city councilmembers seem content to come to meetings and vote on what is put before them, Barber is known for working to put five votes together to get things done. Barber put together the votes to increase the raise for the Police and Fire departments from 5 percent to 7.5 percent. He was also instrumental in getting the water rate increase for city residents reduced from 3.75 percent to 3.25 percent and the rates for those outside the city increased to make up the difference in revenue. Barber, in his previous term on the the problems! But no. The website had not been designed. It had been “Designed.” They’d have a menu that was all run together in a single line, with no spaces between the selections. Then, in the part that listed things you could order, here were the choices: Cookies, Flights, Treats, Merch and Policies. I already have enough policies in my life, so I decided not to order one of those. My puzzlement came from the selection called “Flights.” I could not find, anywhere on the site, an explanation of what they meant by a “Flight.” When I chose that option, it showed me pictures of lots of cookies. So ... maybe a “Flight” is a whole bunch of cookies (continued on page 38) City Council, was one of the forces behind getting the Greensboro Aquatic Center built at the Greensboro Coliseum, something that is now considered a big success. Joining the three incumbents, Johnson, Abuzuaiter and Barber in the at-large race so far are three newcomers, Dave Wils, Michelle Kennedy and Jodi Bennett-Bradshaw. Both Wils and Bennett-Bradshaw are teachers, and Kennedy runs the Interactive Resource Center, the daytime homeless shelter. That’s six who have announced they intend to run, but it would be an unusual year if during the filing period they weren’t joined by at least a couple more. One of the most unusual at-large council candidates in recent years, Jorge Cornell, who ran in 2009 as the leader of the gang the Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation, won’t be running because he’s serving a 28-year sentence in federal prison. But his candidacy did make for some interesting candidate forums. District 2 City Councilmember Jamal Fox has announced he is resigning from the City Council and his replacement will be appointed at the July 18 City Council meeting. According to people who claim to know these things, the appointment will most likely go either to former District 2 City Councilmember Goldie Wells or Tim Vincent, who has announced his intention to run for the District 2 seat. Former District 2 City Councilmember Jim Kee and C.J. Brinson have also said they intend to run for the District 2 seat.

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    Page 17

    RHINO www.rhinotimes.com July 6, 2017 REALESTATE Everything you need to find, finance and buy the house of your dreams Wolfe Home Repairs BY SANDY GROOVER When you own a home, there always seems to be something that needs fixing or updating. The older the house, the greater the probability that something will need to be worked on. Some repairs are unavoidable over time and every homeowner will eventually face them. Many people can do simple repairs themselves, but if you’re not one of them, you’ll need (continued on page 35) S E R V I N G T H E T R I A D F O R O V E R 2 0 Y E A R S Find a Triad home here. view all our listings at cbtriad.com B U R L I N G T O N G R E E N S B O R O K E R N E R S V I L L E H I G H P O I N T W I N S T O N - S A L E M View all of our listings online or directly on your phone. For more photos, information, and directions visit: cbtriad.com 1505 Westover Terrace Greensboro, NC 27408 336-282-4414 2212 Eastchester Drive High Point, NC 27265 336-889-5300 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated

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    18 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 6, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com REAL ESTATE The New York Times crossword puzzle No. 0625 RELEASE DATE: 7/2/2017 ACROSS 1 Weary 6 Flaky stuff 10 Deal watcher, informally 14 Like most grapes 19 ____ bear 20 “Because Freedom Can’t Protect Itself” sloganeer, briefly 21 Finished 22 British politician Farage 23 Rummage (through) 24 Rummage (through) 25 Southern bread 26 Crept furtively 27 Tree-damaging pest accidentally introduced to the U.S. in 1996 31 Ache 32 One likely to have lots of perks 33 Neither good nor bad 34 “Casablanca” woman 35 “Olé! Olé! Olé!,” for one 37 Eddie with the No. 1 country hit “Every Which Way but Loose” 40 The “doll” in Ibsen’s “A Doll’s House” 44 Southwest tourist destination 48 Having a variegated, changing pattern 50 Lost Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). CROPPED BY JACOB STULBERG / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 51 Tech company founder Michael 53 Tie up 54 Matey’s cry 55 Sword go-with 57 Residence of the Japanese imperial family for more than 1,000 years 59 Baseball no-nos 60 Life is a bad one 61 Request 63 Outdoor game for the very young 67 Yearbook sect. 68 Constitution holder 70 Some notebooks, in brief 73 Second-largest city in Vermont 74 Give 75 Give a damn 76 Rehab procedure 80 Singer Rimes 81 High 83 Ham-handed 84 Swiss river to the Rhine 87 Skirt option 89 Hold forth 90 MCAT subject 93 “Seinfeld” character 95 Don 96 Salve 98 Dieter’s salad order request 99 Church area 101 Pair on a slope 103 Kitty 104 Gatekeeping org.? 107 Canful in a cupboard … or a hint to parts of six answers in this puzzle 112 ____ friends 114 Three-time N.H.L. All-Star Kovalchuk 115 Rice-based drink 116 Actor Quinn 117 Big name in organized crime, once 118 Come together 119 “You said it!” 120 Alarm 121 Like those who really have guts? 122 Latin 101 verb 123 Titian’s “Venus of Urbino,” e.g. 124 Cheerleaders’ practice DOWN 1 Sunscreen option 2 Good quality in a model 3 Puckish 4 Lion in “The Lion King” 5 Spy’s attire, stereotypically 6 Like Robinson Crusoe 7 Desktop sight 8 Hard shoes to run in 9 Often-doubled cry at a play 10 “Sure thing!,” jocularly 11 Shakespeare’s stream 12 Former Haitian president Préval 13 Loan shark, for one 14 Starts 15 The Wildcats of the Big East Conference 16 Feverish fit 17 Base ____ 18 Animal on Michigan’s flag 28 Be apprised (of) 29 Where Sanyo and Panasonic are headquartered 30 Slugs 35 Beat handily 36 Many a character on “The Big Bang Theory” 38 Science class, informally 39 Personal commitment? 41 Birthstone after sapphire 42 Game played on a map 43 Does something 44 Observes Ramadan 45 Else 46 Manual’s audience 47 Cunning sort 49 Lift things? 52 Minnesota’s state bird 56 Tennis great Tommy 58 Bricklaying or pipefitting 62 GPS display: Abbr. 63 ____ acid (wine component) 64 Brenda’s twin on “Beverly Hills 90210” 65 German digit 66 Video-game count 68 Adjoining 69 Fertile soil 70 ____ Games 71 Island south of the Cyclades 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 72 Commemorative meal with wine 75 Round up 76 Frisbee, e.g. 77 Singer heard in the first “Lord of the Rings” movie 78 Work day by day, say 79 Bush and Gore, in 2000 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 80 Do House work 82 Relaxed 84 Formerly 85 Vodka or gin: Abbr. 86 Codswallop 88 Petroleum byproduct used to make synthetic rubber 91 Violet shade 92 Join together 94 Like some points 97 Leaf producer 100 Texas A&M athlete 102 Former SeaWorld performer 104 ____ wave 105 Traffic headache 106 Dancer de Mille 107 November imperative 108 They can be brown or blond 109 Ta-tas 110 Gave one’s blessing to 111 “Well done!” 112 Give it ____ 113 Surround, as fans might an idol BASEMENT WATERPROOFING CRAWL SPACE REPAIR CONTACT US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE FOUNDATION REPAIR 877-222-6502 BasementNeighbors.com WE LIFT CONCRETE! - DON’T REPLACE IT RAISE IT!

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    ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT Terra Ceia community fights huge solar farm STATE GOVERNMENT Our analysis of the $23 Billion House and Senate budget compromise TAXATION Roy Cooper’s numbers skew the tax break story PAGE 8 PAGE 4 PAGE 13 A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF NEWS, ANALYSIS AND OPINION FROM THE JOHN LOCKE FOUNDATION CAROLINAJOURNAL.COM VOL. 26 • NO. 7 • JULY 2017 • TRIAD EDITION Trafficking in flesh A human tragedy in need of a solution Trafficking in the Triangle BY KARI TRAVIS KARI TRAVIS ASSOCIATE EDITOR It happened so quickly. Joy Anderson was first deceived. Then, she was lured into a prostitution ring. Anderson, one of four adopted children, had a good home life. But she felt like an outsider, a perception she attributes to her dark skin and unique personality. She met her traffickers at age 19, and, as odd as it now sounds, Anderson found a place to belong. “[I was at a nightclub], and this girl came up to me and pulled out $2,000 or $3,000,” Anderson said. “She told me that I could get that much. She told me that it was easy, so I met her whole team. At the time I met the person that I thought was her boyfriend. But it was her pimp.” “At the time, they took care of me, and gave me continued PAGE 10 Joy Anderson was trafficked for seven years in Charlotte, unable to escape her captors and fearing for her life. Her story represents a growing problem in North Carolina. CJ PHOTO BY KARI TRAVIS Of the 1,000 victims identified in Raleigh, Cary, and Durham in recent years, most are young women between the ages of 16 and 25. Close to 70 percent suffer from heroin and opioid addictions. Business men between the ages of 25 and 45 — with no criminal history — are the top solicitors of prostitutes in the Research Triangle. Most pay for sex during lunch hour. Hotels are trafficking hot spots. The Triangle Rapid Response Team would like to see a “John Project,” designed to penalize consumers and decrease demand for sex trafficking, said Major Rick Hoffman of the Raleigh Police Department. Information courtesy of the North Carolina Human Trafficking Commission, the Triangle Rapid Response Team, and the Raleigh Police Department. Does Pat McCrory want a rematch? CAROLINA JOURNAL 200 W. MORGAN STREET, #200 RALEIGH, NC 27601 CJ ONLINE NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID DURHAM, NC PERMIT NO. 302 Former governor suggests he’ll seek rematch against Cooper. PAGE 7 jlf.carolina.journal @carolinajournal www.carolinajournal.com editor@carolinajournal.com

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    CJ 2 CAROLINA JOURNAL // JULY 2017 QUICK TAKES SUPREME COURT High court overturns North Carolina law that kept sex offenders off social media EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rick Henderson @deregulator MANAGING EDITOR John Trump @jtrump21 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Don Carrington dcarrington@carolinajournal.com ASSOCIATE EDITORS Mitch Kokai @mitchkokai Lindsay Marchello @LynnMarch007 Kari Travis @karilynntravis Dan Way @danway_carolina DESIGNER Greg de Deugd gdedeugd@johnlocke.org PUBLISHED BY The John Locke Foundation 200 W. Morgan St., # 200 Raleigh, N.C. 27601 (919) 828-3876 • Fax: 821-5117 www.JohnLocke.org Kory Swanson President & Publisher John Hood Chairman Bill Graham, John M. Hood Ted Hicks, Christine Mele Brad Muller, Paul Slobodian David Stover, J.M Bryan Taylor Edwin Thomas Board of Directors Carolina Journal is a monthly journal of news, analysis, and commentary on state and local government and public policy issues in North Carolina. ©2017 by The John Locke Foundation Inc. All opinions expressed in bylined articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors of CJ or the staff and board of the John Locke Foundation. Material published herein may be reprinted as long as appropriate credit is given. Submissions and letters are welcome and should be directed to the editor. To subscribe, call 919-828-3876. Readers also can request Carolina Journal Weekly Report, delivered each weekend by e-mail, or visit CarolinaJournal.com for news, links, and exclusive content updated each weekday. Those interested in education, economics, higher education, health care or local government also can ask to receive weekly e-letters covering these issues. THE CONVENTION OF STATES PROJECT — calling for the General Assembly to support a constitutional convention to rein in federal power — came to the legislative complex June 27. Backers of the project brought a llama, decked in patriotic garb, to Halifax Mall behind the Legislative Building. Several legislative staffers and interns took pictures with the llama, which also sported a button supporting the convention. FROM STAFF REPORTS FIRST AMENDMENT rights just got the “green light” on two University of North Carolina campuses. New findings from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a nonpartisan research and litigation organization, show a positive shift in speech protections at UNC-Charlotte and East Carolina University. FIRE divides public and private universities into three rankings: red light, yellow light, and green light. Red-light schools are the worst offenders of free speech. Green-light schools are the best at upholding First Amendment rights. Now, six universities have achieved FIRE’s high- PHOTO PROVIDED BY EMMA CATHERINE HARRISON More UNC campuses giving free speech its due, FIRE reports est honor: UNC-Charlotte, East Carolina University, UNC Greensboro, N.C. Central University, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke University. North Carolina has the most green-light universities in the country. North Carolina has 10 schools still in the yellow category and three in the red. Yellow-light policies, while not inherently restrictive, contain arbitrary wording that could be used to stifle free speech. It’s heartening to see public universities voluntarily change bad policies, said Azhar Majeed, vice president of policy reform at FIRE. N.C. Central overhauled eight restrictions, including residential life and sexual harassment codes, he said. FROM STAFF REPORTS The U.S. Supreme Court on June 26 overturned a ruling by the N.C. Supreme Court that prevented sex offenders from using social media. In Packingham v. North Carolina, a convicted sex offender was arrested for using Facebook. The man, Lester Packingham, claimed a violation of his First Amendment rights. In the court’s opinion, social media websites are an essential forum in the digital world, and a law preventing access for criminals excluded them from a principal means of communication. “By prohibiting sex offenders from using those websites, North Carolina with one broad stroke bars access to what for many are the principal sources for knowing current events, checking ads for employment, speaking and listening in the modern public square, and otherwise exploring the vast realms of human thought and knowledge,” wrote Justice Anthony Kennedy in the 5-3 decision. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan supported Kennedy. New findings show a positive shift in speech protections at UNC-Charlotte and East Carolina University. The university reached out to FIRE last year, asking staffers for input. UNC-Greensboro also was proactive. The school revised its sexual harassment policy, the only redlight code on its books, then asked FIRE to review it. After a UNC-Charlotte student requested her university reform its speech codes in accordance with FIRE’s requirements, the school answered the call and revised three of its policies. Justice Samuel Alito wrote a concurring opinion that agreed with the more liberal justices on their judgment, but not on their reasoning. Conservative-leaning justices John Roberts and Clarence Thomas sided with Alito. Justice Neil Gorsuch did not participate in the case. The court pressed that limitations on a sex offender’s navigation of the internet had to prevent unlawful activity, such as contact with a minor, but that reasoning could not prevent its lawful use. “It is unsettling to suggest that only a limited set of websites can be used even by persons who have completed their sentences,” the opinion stated. “Even convicted criminals — and in some instances especially convicted criminals — might receive legitimate benefits from those means for access to the world of ideas, in particular if they seek to reform and to pursue lawful and rewarding lives.” The state court previously held that the law was a “limitation on conduct,” rather than a free-speech violation, and claimed the government had an interest in “forestalling the illicit lurking and contact” of registered sex offenders and potential victims. The opinion compared the North Carolina law to one overturned in a previous case involving a wide-ranging restriction on speech at Los Angeles International Airport. Both restrictions were considered overbroad and “an impermissible burden” under the First Amendment. In his concurring opinion, Alito took issue with the court’s equivalence of social media and public streets and parks. “Cyberspace is different from the physical world, and if it is true, as the Court believes, that ‘we cannot appreciate yet’ the ‘full dimensions and vast potential’ of ‘the Cyber Age,’ we should proceed circumspectly, taking one step at a time,” Alito cautioned. Packingham was convicted of indecent liberties with a minor in 2002, when he was a 21-year-old college student. Authorities were alerted to him in 2010 after he made a Facebook post thanking God for the dismissal of a parking ticket. The court’s opinion notes that more than 1,000 people have been prosecuted under the North Carolina law. A professor at ECU asked the university to change its speech codes and got four policies revised to meet FIRE’s green-light standards. All of those universities passed FIRE’s test with flying colors. Every university should take similar action, Majeed said. But often, that’s not reality. “Unfortunately, it’s common for us to be ignored, or to find that the university is unresponsive when we point out those types of policy issues,” he said. Of the 100 schools FIRE contacted last year, roughly 30 asked the organization to help make their speech codes constitutional, a positive thing, Majeed said. There are only 33 greenlight universities, both public and private, in the United States. Schools such as N.C. Central and UNC-Greensboro should be lauded for their efforts, said Samantha Harris, FIRE’s vice president of policy research. “We want every school to be a green-light, and to work with every school administration as much as possible, but it’s not as common as we would hope,” she said. “So when a school like a UNC-Greensboro reaches out to us and says ‘we want to do this,’ it’s something we’re really excited and happy about.” UNC-Wilmington, still a yellow-light school, is working with FIRE to move into the green category, Majeed told CJ.

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