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Business London Magazine | September2017
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    before, but our goal is to have all roads lead to Voices.com. Both the investment and acquisition are important steps to this. My dad’s advice to invest in myself has paid off, although the learning process has been extensive, with hundreds of mentors, incubators, audiobooks, staff members, and of course, my business partner, to thank for the insights, support, and education along the way. If you had told Stephanie and I a decade ago that we’d be servicing talent agencies and many of the world’s biggest, most celebrated brands, it would have been hard to believe. Today it is a reality. For Stephanie and I, something that is very important to us as founders is that we keep Voices.com in London, Ontario, Canada. Our business began when we wrote the idea on a napkin at our kitchen table in the heart of downtown. Being an employer that provides Londoners with exciting careers and meaningful work in a thriving corporate culture is vital. London is home, and Voices.com will continue to hire talented people who are curious, competitive, and coachable. DAVID CICCARELLI CELEBRATING FAMILY BUSINESS IN OUR COMMUNITY! The Family Enterprise of the Year Award (FEYA) recognizes the significant achievements of a Southwestern Ontario family businesses. NOMINATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED FAMILY ENTERPRISE OF THE YEAR AWARD The award will be presented at Family Business Day in the spring of 2018 hosted by FEX, in partnership with the Business Families Centre at Ivey Business School. DEADLINE FOR NOMINATIONS: SEPT. 30 Previous Award Recipients: • Larsen & Shaw • JMR Electric Ltd. • LiquiForce • Moffatt & Powell • McCabe Promotional Advertising Inc. • The Collins Family (Hully Gully/ Ultimate Toy Store) • Hayman Construction • Flanagan Foodservice Inc. • Metropolitan Maintenance • Steelway Building Systems • Sifton Properties Ltd. Family Enterprise Xchange Southwestern Ontario T: 519.642.4349 E: swo@family-enterprise-xchange.com SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 41

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    The Voice . . . of Business OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE — SEPTEMBER 2017 www.londonchamber.com Meet Andrew Schiestel President of the Board of Directors 2017/18 Each year the Chamber’s “Voice” Magazine has the opportunity to sit down with the incoming President of the Board of Directors to ask a series of questions about what the membership can expect at the Chamber under their leadership. What follows is a Q & A interview that was conducted this past July. Andrew Schiestel is a Canadian technology and marketing entrepreneur. He built his first website at 15 years old, and has lived and breathed the Internet ever since. Andrew is the president at tbk Creative, a London-based web design and digital marketing agency. In 2017 and 2016, tbk Creative was named “Top Web Design Provider” in London by Consumer Choice Award, and in 2016 as well, the company was named “Small Business of the Year” at the London Chamber of Commerce Business Achievement Awards. Andrew’s articles on digital marketing and the digital economy have appeared in the Financial Post, the Globe and Mail, and the London Free Press. 42 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017

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    News Voice: Andrew your record of achievements in all things internet and in particular the social media space both in our community and across the country is really quite remarkable. What motivated you to step into the lead role of a business organization like the Chamber’s Board of Directors? When starting tbk Creative seven years ago, we had very few business contacts. The London Chamber was the first business group our company joined and it gave us a way to connect to London’s business community. Over time, as I got more acquainted with all the work our Chamber does, it was amazing to learn about the important public policy work it does. Many people don’t realize this, but the Chamber is regularly advocating for our interests on a variety of important matters, such as Ontario’s ever-increasing electricity prices, ensuring federal fiscal responsibility, WSIB reforms, and many more. The Chamber truly is the voice of business. It’s the combination of those two things: the opportunity the Chamber provided my company in its early days, combined with the sheer importance of its public policy work that made it easy – and an honour – to say yes to serving as President of the Board. Voice: As each new president of the Board of Directors assumes their role, there is always going to be a certain amount of curiosity about what leadership style they will apply. Have you given any thought as to what style will work best for you and what the membership can expect? The Chamber already operates with an extremely modern, best-inclass governance structure. Additionally, the Chamber is blessed with seasoned and extremely experienced and professional staff along with a volunteer network of passionate and committed business people. When you’re coming into an environment this well-organized, it certainly makes things easier as President. My focus this year will be rolling up my sleeves and working with the Board to continue the great momentum and success that the Chamber, through Past Presidents like Jeff Macoun and Paul Way, have already achieved for our membership. At the same time I hope I can bring to light some new business priorities that will require our awareness and action. My focus this year will be rolling up my sleeves and working with the Board to continue the great momentum and success that the Chamber, through Past Presidents like Jeff Macoun and Paul Way, have already achieved for our membership.” — Andrew Schiestel, President of the the Board of Directors Voice: In your opening remarks to the new Board of Directors you briefly outlined three goals you hoped to achieve or at least get off the ground during your term. They included enhancing the Chamber’s already exalted reputation as a leading advocacy organization, preparing the Chamber and the wider business community for the next wave of technological advancements and at least starting the conversation about how to attract more women to get engaged in entrepreneurism. Lofty goals all. Can you expand on how you plan to achieve them? I’ll address these in order. First, what a lot of people don’t realize is the amount of government advocacy work the London Chamber does on our businesses’ and economy’s behalf. When you choose a London Chamber membership, it’s not just a place to network; you really are investing into an organization that is fighting to continually create an economic environment in which your business can thrive. Our London Chamber is already recognized as one of the top “Policy” chambers in the country, but I’d like to work with the board and staff to see this message get out more to our member base and local community. Second, is technology. I think the Chamber is uniquely positioned to help connect organizations and strengthen London business opportunities around emerging technologies and innovation. Our federal government is on record stating they wish to keep “Canada at the leading edge of the digital economy”, so we want to make sure London is taking steps to be there along the way. In working with our board, staff, and volunteers, I’d like to see more educational opportunities available to our members about some of these nascent or growing technological opportunities. The last goal involves women and entrepreneurship. Although increasing, according to some studies, less than 30% of companies are majority owned by women. More women getting involved in business can lead to greater innovation and economic breakthroughs for our country. I’d like to get the conversation going around this topic and see where it goes. I had the honour of starting tbk Creative seven years ago with a woman who is our CEO & Chief Creative Officer, so I can say, at least anecdotally, that more women in entrepreneurship and leadership roles will be good for business! Voice: You speak of the next wave of technological advancements or threats. What do you see coming SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 43

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    News down the pipe that we should be concerned about? In economic terms, the nice thing about a threat is it’s like one side of a coin with the other side being opportunity. These are some initial topics that come to mind: First, businesses and the government are grappling more with cyber security; the Canadian Chamber of Commerce released a report earlier this year that cited that 32% of respondents have now experienced some form of cybercrime. There will be opportunities now, and in the future, for businesses to help companies and the government navigate this very technical savannah. There’s going to be tremendous opportunity in technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things, autonomous technologies, and so forth. The federal government is already spending money in AI, clean tech, and other technologies, to help the private sector be more competitive – the question is, can London businesses contribute more to conversations around innovation? Of course we can! But education has to come first and the Chamber can assist with this. The last thing I’ll mention is that we need to have balanced and progressive policy in this area. Policy creation is completely in our country’s control – it does not come from some outside, disruptive force. A key to a vibrant digital economy is making sure our elected officials create balanced policy that protects citizens, while still allowing an environment that businesses can thrive in. As an example, Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) is one such policy that went too far in trying to achieve its objectives. It was created with good intention but needs to be improved upon to be easier for our Canadian companies to comply with. It’s in everyone’s interest that we do what we can to work with our elected officials and bureaucrats so that sound policy decisions get created that ultimately make Canada successful in the digital economy. Voice: You also asked the new Board to start thinking about how as an organization the Chamber could foster more support for women getting into business. This has always been a tricky and somewhat delicate subject to tackle. How do you plan to approach it? There are many people in London who are already passionate about this topic so I think it’s an easy conversation to have. The London Chamber’s board for example, is already quite diversified but, I have also seen how the Chamber and most other organizations in London struggle to populate their Boards and Committees with women entrepreneurs. Through my own business experience as well as from being a member of the Chamber, I have met many outstanding female entrepreneurs but we still need more. And I believe that starts with a dialogue about barriers and opportunities specific to women entrepreneurs. Only then can we start compiling the necessary resources to support and engage women in the business community. Voice: Andrew, each successive President of the Board has the ability to look back at the end of their term and recount what has been accomplished. Using your best crystal ball can you cast your mind forward to June 2018, and see there what success might look like for you? The Chamber had an outstanding year under Jeff Macoun’s leadership. We have a strong membership base, a great board, experienced staff and some of the most passionate volunteers a community can find. We’ve also had an extremely successful financial year that will be hard to beat. For me success will be our ability to maintain that momentum. And of course, in achieving the goals that I outlined. Voice: Any final thoughts? Just this. I am extremely privileged and honoured to be in this position and I take it very seriously On behalf of your London Chamber Board of Directors, we wish everyone’s businesses continued success, and look forward to connecting with you at an upcoming event! Last month’s Business After Five was hosted by Chop Steakhouse & Bar. Members enjoyed networking with a relaxed atmosphere while sampling some delicious food. Many thanks to Mike Nezny, Owner; Mike Keyte, General Manager, Jeremy Zillman, Head Chef and all the wonderful staff at Chop 44 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 Steakhouse & Bar. Thanks also to Business After Five sponsor Libro Credit Union as well as to Checker Limousine Service and Music Central and all the Membership Services Committee volunteers. This month, Business After Five will be hosted by Innovation Works.

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    on the BOOKS RETIREMENT HELL BYPRODUCT OF A MIDDLE CLASS UNDER SIEGE Don Pollock IT’S 4:30 A.M. Dawn is hovering on the horizon; a doe dashes through the forest, a fawn in tow. Don Pollock watches the scene unfold from his kitchen, thoughts racing through his head, a cup of steaming coffee in hand. It’s his favourite time of day when inspiration hits and words tumble freely onto the page. “I don’t have a process when I write, but I do get up every day at 4:30 a.m. I exercise, and then I go at it for a couple of hours. But for sure there are certain days when I am more in the mood for writing than others,” says the first time author. Pollock recently launched his first book – Retirement Hell — Byproduct of a Middle Class Under Siege. The book takes a long and hard look at the pitfalls of retirement. It took him close to six months to write the book, but the ideas have been percolating for a long time. Pollock, who turned 66 this year, is a retired accountant with a degree from the Ivey Business School. He was just 25 when he began a 30-year career in income tax and pensions at 3M Company. Certainly, he enjoyed the job, but it also served a greater purpose, one that would become more apparent as the years rolled on - it provided him with the inspiration and the financial stability to eventually pursue his dream of becoming an author. That dream was also fueled by handson experience in the publishing industry – he’d owned his own publishing company for 30 years and had penned and distributed two high profile financial newsletters to a well-heeled list of over 3,000 CEO’s, tax professionals and accountants. But he notes that writing a book is an entirely different endeavour. To help him through the process, he joined the London Writers’ Society, an organization of local writers who meet once a month to discuss strategies, techniques and ideas. “Publishing is three separate tasks – the first is creating the product, the second is deciding on distribution and the third is marketing,” says Pollock. When the book was finished, Pollock sifted through the publishing options, choosing to self-publish rather than pursue the traditional route of finding an agent and then a publishing house. “I’m retired and I’m not in this for the money. But I do have a message that I want to get out there, so if I make $5,000 or I make nothing, it doesn’t matter,” he says, adding that if you want to earn money from writing the best route to follow is the traditional publishing format. He uses the online publishing and distribution site CreateSpace and distributes through both Amazon and Kindle. To assist him with the book design and layout, he commandeered the services of Western University’s book design department. “I said here is my book, please design it, I am an accountant, I don’t have the skills,” recalls Pollock. They charged him $500 for two covers and the layout of the first book (he is soon to roll out his second book – Retirement Hell – Survival Guide for Families and Our Country). He launched the book in April, holding a celebration at London’s Bernie’s Bar & Grill and since then has been avidly marketing his book through speaking engagements, book signings and lunch and learns. “I think so far I’ve distributed about 450 books and probably given away about half of those,” he says with a laugh, noting that when you self-publish you have to do all of the marketing and “that can be hard work.” His advice to other writers involves a sprinkle of reality and a dash of financial wisdom. “The first thing you need to consider is that writing is not a great way to make a living. It’s a hobby, a passion. So you have to ask yourself: do I want to make money or do I have a story to tell?” ANDREA COX SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 45

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    driving BUSINESS originally the car had a 283 cubic inch V8 small-block engine with a two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission. The previous owner changed that to a 350 cubic inch smallblock engine and a TH350 3 speed automatic transmission. i updated the stereo system with a fully integrated Bluetooth in-dash stereo radio headunit, which allows me to talk on the phone hands-free as well as use my phone’s navigation system. There are multiple amplifiers and aftermarket speakers throughout the vehicle. the year alone makes it a relatively rare car. More commonly found are the ‘64 and ‘65 models, but most are convertibles. my first ride in the car was in January of 1997. My dad and I frequented the local car shows, and I had always dreamed of a loud chrome covered car. my dad sold the car in 2001. My older brother moved out west, and my parents moved to Philadelphia, so the car wasn’t driven at that point. It was on consignment at a used car lot, and within a few days, it sold. I never realized how important this car would be later on in my life. 46 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 Adam Brock President Food Safety Alliance 1966 Pontiac Parisienne 2-door hardtop flash forward to Aug.6. 2016. I was cutting my lawn and decided to stop halfway through to go to the store. I got to the stop sign at the end of my street, and the Parisienne was going through the intersection. I followed them through Byron until finally pulling into a crowded parking lot at Boler Mountain. I saw the owner of the Parisienne pay his $10 to park and continue in. I drove up to the teenager collecting the money for parking and told him I was not parking. I was going to buy that car! I told the owner that my dad had passed away suddenly and completely unexpectedly just one year prior and if he ever wanted to sell it to please contact me. He explained he was going to place the car for sale online the following day. I purchased the car officially on Aug. 10, 2016. i do not believe in coincidence; there is no doubt in my mind this car was a present sent from my dad, and the deal was orchestrated from above. My plate is MENT2BMB. My dad’s name was Mike Brock, but everyone knew him as Brocky or MB.

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    Law In Balance Harrison Pensa is proud to welcome three new Associates to our firm. An insurance defence litigator, who strives to make a difference, Arifa Serter strikes a balance between serving her clients and serving her community. Whether working with nonprofit organizations to address important social issues or helping her clients see their day in court, Arifa bends over backwards to achieve the best outcomes. Joining the Business and Financial Services Law Group, Matthew Bota brings intense focus and clarity to his work in corporate/commercial, real estate and tax litigation. Matt’s success is deeply rooted through his work in client services, secured transactions and small business law. Lauren Haberer also joins the Business and Financial Services Law Group. Her background encompasses international law studies, time spent abroad and community leadership including Board of Director involvement. With her global outlook, Lauren has the flexibility to advise individuals, small businesses, and private corporations with a variety of business opportunities and challenges. We welcome our new associates and know they look forward to bringing you peace of mind in your legal affairs, whatever they may be. Namaste. 450 Talbot Street, London, Ontario N6A 5J6 Tel: 519 679 9660 Fax: 519 667 3362 www.harrisonpensa.com

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