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Business London Magazine | September2017
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    30 Seconds with Dave Bartlam Q. How have online travel websites influenced the hospitality business? Online travel sites are how we promote our business. They spend a lot of marketing dollars attracting customers, and in return, we receive reservations on a daily basis. However, direct bookings through our Marriott website still prove to be the better option for both the guest and property. Q. What aspect of your business surprises people the most? People are always surprised to learn that Marriott has 31 different brands, 5,700 locations and more than 1.2 million rooms around the world. And one fantastic reward program. MODERN LUXURY OFFICE & MEDICAL SPACE North London’s Premier Office Location Built to Suit / Construction Started Q. What drew you to sales and the hotel industry? The Scatcherd family and the Oakwood Resort initially drew me to the industry. I am a people person, and I enjoy all aspects of the business. Selling people experiences and memories is a fun process. Q. Do you have any advice for travelers contemplating Airbnb instead of a hotel? If you like to look for a key late at night or you enjoy inconsistency. Then Airbnb is for you. With a hotel, there are basic levels of hospitality that you can expect (24-hour staff, dining, housekeeping and security). Q. Do you have any pearls of wisdom for young people interested in sales or the hospitality sector? You must enjoy what you are selling and believe in your product. Equally, you must know your competition. Don’t be shy, ask for the sale! ALREADY 75% LEASED SUITE SIZES FROM 1,000 - 8,000 SQ. FT. 200 VILLAGE WALK BLVD OFF RICHMOND AND SUNNINGDALE MICHAEL MESCIA | 519.870.1335 | DOMUSDEV.COM SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 11

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    Tickets $ 50 Start your morning with Retired Fort McMurray Fire Chief Darby Allen In Support of the Salvation Army The Salvation Army hosts Hope In The City November 15, 2017; 7:30 am – 9:00 am Best Western Lamplighter Inn & Conference Centre DOORS OPEN AT 7:00 am @TSALondon | #HopeInTheCity Thank you to our sponsors HopeInTheCityLondon.ca or call (519) 433-6106 Presenting Sponsor Speaker Sponsor Media Sponsors Host Sponsor

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    20 seconds Fuel Fitness provides private in-home personal training and nutritional counselling tailored to help clients attain their health and fitness goals. We had a quick conversation with the owner, David Ghent-Kyle. www.fuelfit.ca 226-272-1200 info@fuelfit.ca www.facebook.com/ FuelFitnessLondonOntario How many years have you been working in the fitness industry? 10 years. What packages does Fuel Fitness offer? Personal training, Coaching call, Diet overhaul, Kitchen rehab, Grocery store 101, The works What is your favourite cardio? My favourite cardio is playing sports. Hockey, soccer and squash. Avocado - yes or no? Avocados are a definite YES! Remember to have them in moderation as fat is more calorie dense than carbohydrates and protein per gram. Another interesting fact about avocados is that they contain a wide array of phytochemicals that have to ability to search and selectively destroy tumour cells. What is a piece of nutritional information most people don’t know? You need fat to lose fat! A diet lacking in fat will stall weight loss. A diet low in essential fats can lead to lower levels of testosterone and other fast busting hormones. Do you have a favourite weight training tip? Be efficient with your time, short intense tabata style workouts that push you beyond your comfort level are just as effective as longer workouts. One mistake most people make in the kitchen? Cooking with extra virgin olive oil as it oxidizes readily at temperatures over 350F, burning and becoming toxic. Olive oil should mainly be used as a finisher to dishes after the cooking is done for flavour. A good cooking oil substitute is avocado oil. SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 13

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    Sports means business Theresa Carriere’s leadership skills have strong roots 14 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 GROWING UP WITH six brothers and six sisters in a working class neighbourhood of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, personal fitness trainer and life coach Theresa Carriere learned quickly how to survive within a highly-competitive environment. But the biggest fight of her life would come in April 2007, when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. With loving care from a dedicated team of health professionals and family members, and following a double mastectomy, Carriere, 54, is today not only surviving but thriving as a wife, mother, coach and philanthropist. In 2010, she established ONERUN, an annual fundraiser which has raised more than $800,000 to help in the fight against breast cancer. Using every tool taught to her by her parents, Sam and Jenny Colizza, Carriere has succeeded in every one of her roles, as a wife, mother, basketball star at Western University and Fanshawe College, fitness professional, businessperson and fundraiser. In fact, Carriere said each of the tools she uses to succeed in life can be utilized to survive in any entrepreneurial role. “We were a very competitive family, and we were always outdoors,” Carriere said of her Sault roots. “Dad (who died just before the first ONERUN fundraiser in 2010) put up a basketball hoop in our yard, and built a huge ice rink. We didn’t have much money. You had to earn everything. You had to work hard. And you had to be patient. Nothing was given to you.” Carriere played one year with the Mustangs women’s basketball squad in 1982-83 but said her “heart wasn’t there.” She followed in her sister Maria’s footsteps and joined the Falcons for three seasons, 1983-84 to 1985-86 while studying in Fanshawe’s Applied Fitness and Health Promotion program. Carriere was a team leader and MVP, an Ontario and Canadian college all-star, member of the Falcons hall of fame (as is Maria) and a member of the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association all-millennium team. Theresa married her college sweetheart, Bill, also a Falcons basketball player. The London couple has four children, all basketball standouts: Nicole, 26; Danielle, 24; Katelyn, 22; and Vincent, 19. Both Nicole and Danielle assist their parents in coaching the Falcons women’s basketball team. In addition to her personal training business, Theresa also works as the strength and conditioning coach with London’s Southwest Furfaro Basketball Academy. With such a busy, multi-faceted life, Carriere’s schedule demands professional time management, leadership, disciplinary and team-building skills – all important to surviving any business effort. “There’s such a feeling of accomplishment when you work hard and overcome obstacles. You absolutely must stay focused to accomplish your goals. My parents were very much that way. They always said, ‘Work hard, and trust those around you, surround yourself with good people, share your values and goals with them,’” Carriere explained. When Carriere set out to run the 100-km route from Sarnia to London in one day during the first ONERUN fundraiser, she at first thought it was an impossible goal. “I thought, that’s a long way to run. And I’m not sure I can raise that kind of money. But fortunately for me, I had that 20 seconds of courage to say it out loud. And the ONERUN committee was born,” she said. “ONERUN has hundreds of volunteers. And I think that’s ultimately what makes a great leader is having a team that works as hard as you, and that is as passionate as you are. We’re all capable of doing great things. We want to inspire others and we want to give back. If there’s something you view as unfair, or something you think needs to be changed, that we all have the ability Theresa Carriere Theresa FACEBOOK.COM/ONERUN Carriere FACEBOOK.COM/ONERUN

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    to do that,” Carriere said. A 2015 Pillar Leadership Award winner, Carriere points to her strong upbringing in the Sault, her leadership and team skills learned playing high school, university and college basketball, and her fight against cancer as all reasons for her becoming a role model. She also points to one of her heroes, Mother Teresa, as someone who dedicated an entire life to giving back to others. But no matter what role you play in business, in sports or in life, you always have an important role, Carriere said. “What I’ve learned through growing up in a large family, and through basketball, and through ONERUN, is what I encourage my kids to do every day: recognize that everyone has value. Whether you’re a first-string player or the 12th player, every teammate is important and adds value to the team,” Carriere explained. “Whether you bring intensity to practice, or you’re playing tough defense in a game so the firststringers can score, you are important. Just think of the hundreds of volunteers with ONERUN. They have all played an important role. “I always remember thinking, what makes leaders leaders? Why are they so special that they have this incredible courage? And I discovered in the last few years that we all have it. We just need to dig deep to find it. It only takes a few seconds of courage to step out of your comfort zone and create change,” she said. There are lessons to learn from making mistakes, whether they come in the boardroom or on the basketball court. Carriere said one big lesson she has learned is that you can’t do everything on your own, and at the same time you should not be afraid to ask for help. She’s a student of life-long learning. And, Carriere preaches the importance of humility. “I don’t view myself as one of the great leaders,” she said. “I’m just this ordinary person who has had the opportunity to serve the community. And it’s a neat thing to see that ordinary people can do extraordinary things.” JEFFREY REED COMMIT TO YOU CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER & FITNESS NUTRITIONIST YOUR LOCATION, YOUR TIME, OUR EXPERTISE WEIGHT LOSS, FITNESS GAINS, DIET OVERHAUL BOOK ONLINE INFO@FUELFIT.CA • 1 (226) 272 - 1200 • WWW.FUELFIT.CA WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS! Elgin Audiology is happy to announce our new Audiologists, Shane Moodie and Ioan Curca, and welcome them to our team. Shane and Ioan are both accepting new patients and look forward to seeing you soon. Shane Moodie. H.B.Sc., B.Ed., M.Cl.Sc., AUD(C) Shane comes to us from Western University where he spent many years as a Research Audiologist at the National Centre of Audiology and as a UWO Clinical Instructor in Audiology. He has educated generations of Audiologists and provided countless hours of Audiology services to clients from far and wide at Western. We are grateful to have him continue his patient care work with Elgin Audiology. Ioan Curca, Ph.D., M.CI.Sc., AUD(C) Ioan brings a bounty of knowledge in assessing and treating clients experiencing problems with dizziness, vertigo and unsteadiness. He also currently conducts research at Western University and is welcoming new patients with all types of hearing and dizziness difficulties. Call Elgin Audiology to arrange an assessment at one of our clinics near you. 1- 888-815-2306 Aylmer • West Lorne • St. Thomas Stratford • Blenheim • Lambeth • London www.elginaudiology.com SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 15

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    A& LEO LARIZZA General Manager, Highland Country Club The responsibilities attached to running a private golf club are enormous, but for one week at London’s Highland Country Club, those responsibilities increase exponentially for general manager Leo Larizza. The Mackenzie Tour-PGA Tour, Canada’s season-ending championship, and the Freedom 55 Financial Championship, put a worldwide spotlight on the golf course, its hospitality offerings, and its management and members. Larizza, 51, has filled the GM role for almost 17 years. He spoke with Business London about his myriad of roles. BY JEFFREY REED Q. For one week, September 11-17, the members of Highland Country Club give up their golf course to the elite of the Mackenzie Tour-PGA Tour Canada – golfers just two steps away from the PGA Tour. There’s a lot of responsibility involved when you are hosting a championship of this magnitude. How do you prepare to showcase your club to the world? There’s a lot of work that goes into the planning of the tournament, and a ton of work that goes on behind the scenes even during tournament week. There are financial responsibilities, recruiting and overseeing volunteers, marketing and promotions, securing corporate sponsors and making sure that guests enjoy their visit to Highland. It is a year-long endeavor. It’s up to us to put on a good 16 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 show for one week. But every week of the year, there is another challenge during preparation. Q. This year, the third year Highland hosts the Freedom 55 Financial Championship, Golf Canada – the game’s governing body in our country – has handed over many of the tournament operations to you, the host club. How has that transition progressed, and what challenges did it bring? We went from simply being the host venue and organizing volunteers, to then being responsible for sponsorships, the pro-am tournament and every other aspect of running this golf tournament, other than the responsibilities of the Mackenzie Tour, which involve play on the golf course. It has been a lot more work than we ever imagined. But it all comes down to teamwork – having a strong team in place who have a common goal, and that is to stage a great tournament. Q. Before arriving at Highland in January 2001, you had worked for seven years in management at the private West Haven Golf and Country Club in London. How did you rely on that previous experience to help shape your new post, and concurrently better the membership experience at Highland? I arrived at Highland already versed in the golf course industry, and in how to deal with the politics and business operation of the golf course industry.

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    So there were no big surprises. But what did grab my attention was how much potential there was at Highland, despite its long history of being a premiere club in Southwestern Ontario since 1922. For example, the facilities needed some TLC, so we made some improvements, and that, in turn, helped bring more members to the club. Q. Highland is unique to the London area, because of its menu of offerings – a championship golf course now attracting some of the world’s best golfers, plus a first-rate curling facility. But you came on board as the new sheriff in town: no time for compromising. You must have ruffled some feathers? The potential was huge, but was not being taken advantage of, so when I came to Highland, I told the club that unless they were going to make some changes, then they had the wrong person for the job. And to credit the club, we did make some significant changes. For example, the members’ lounge was on the curling side and didn’t even offer a view of the golf course. That was not good for the members, the golfers nor anyone having a special function, including weddings. So we moved the members’ lounge, and turned the former lounge into a banquet room. Q. At this point in your career in what is essentially a career in the hospitality industry, one would assume you are on automatic pilot. Yet within that industry, every day brings a new challenge. What gets you excited to come to work each day? The biggest thing that motivates me is the challenge not to get complacent. We’re always trying to improve here at Highland. You can never sit back and rest on your past successes and accomplishments. Whether it’s the clubhouse, the golf course or the people, the challenge rests in pleasing the members, growing the membership and keeping everything current. Q. There are more golf courses in London and area per capita than anywhere else in North America. When you look at the Highland membership of 2001 versus today’s membership, at a club now hosting the Mackenzie Tour’s flagship event, how have the members evolved? A lot of golf courses have opened in London since Highland formed in 1922, and the industry has changed even over the past 16 years. It’s a challenge maintaining and growing a membership because there is too much product out there, and not enough people joining private clubs. It’s important for us, and for any private club, to attract a family membership. There are a number of people who join our club because they want their kids to get into the game of golf. They like the environment. They don’t want their kids locked up in their bedrooms playing video games. Q. The Freedom 55 Financial Championship will again benefit Thames Valley Children’s Centre. Most people are not aware of your charity work. In 1985, you founded Teresina Larizza Charities (TLC) Foundation, named after your late mother. Throughout the year, TLC Foundation raises thousands of dollars, and grants wishes to children who are underprivileged, living with severe disabilities or, in many cases, who are terminally ill. My mother taught me to give to less fortunate people. I try to cheer up the kids, bring them hope, offer them a little happiness in their lives. For many of them, their world is very sad. Throughout the year, there are a lot of hospital visits. I help Ronald McDonald House, Childcan and other groups, building relationships – not just delivering gifts. I help them get through the tough times. But most of the time, I am at their funerals. It’s very, very tough, very sad. But there are a lot of Londoners with big hearts. Like the members of Highland, we’re all like family. Making your world brighter since 1985 livinglighting.com Richmond St. at Fanshawe I 519.667.3022 londonnorth@livinglighting.com SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 17

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    Gregg and Justin Wolfe PHOTO: MARK SPOWART Dining with the Wolfes These indie operators are shaping how Londoners dine It’s no secret that making it in the restaurant industry can be tough, especially in a mid-size city like London. But the big, bad Wolfe brothers managed to build a Forest City food empire one epic restaurant at a time. Their latest eatery, a modern Mexican joint called Los Lobos, opened downtown London on Talbot Street in August. It’s the third restaurant Gregg, 38, and Justin Wolfe, 36, have launched in the city over the past five years. Los Lobos, which fittingly means ‘the wolves’ in Spanish, features everything foodies have come to expect from the rock and roll loving restaurateurs – vibrant décor, hip music, stellar cocktails and authentic food that looks as good as it tastes. “It’s about the whole package,” says Justin. “We pay a lot of attention to the atmosphere because that’s the first thing you see when you walk in. People start 18 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 having conversations right off the bat. And if your service, your food and your cocktails deliver you have that winning recipe.” It’s a formula that’s gained the Wolfe brothers more than just a taste of success. Just down the street from Los Lobos, you’ll find The Early Bird. Beloved by students and businesspeople alike for its colourful décor and scrumptious brunch menu, it’s been a downtown staple since it began serving up late night eats in 2012. The diner gained national attention in 2013 when featured on The Food Network’s “You Gotta Eat Here”. The core eatery has become such a favourite among locals and tourists alike that it’s expanded twice in just five years. Then there’s Wolfe of Wortley, the Old South restaurant that proudly bears the family name. The buzz hasn’t stopped since doors opened in June 2016. Wolfe of Wortley was named one of ‘Canada’s Best New Restaurants’ in 2017 by Air Canada’s En Route magazine, the only London kitchen to ever make the list. The 800 sq. ft., ‘big city style eatery’ is shaped as a slice of pizza and in the heart of Wortley Village, only a few blocks from where Gregg and Justin went to high school at London South Collegiate Institute. With a menu that changes week to week and a cocktail list that would impress even the most seasoned mixologist, including a Manhattan, served in a cinnamon smoked filled glass, it has quickly become one of London’s unique dining experiences. “We opened The Wolfe for us,” says Justin. “We’re pushing people and giving them a new experience. It’s our happy place. That’s why our names are on the outside.” Janette MacDonald, CEO of Downtown London, an umbrella group supporting downtown merchants, says

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    This time we will run it like we always wanted too, as a bourbon focused proper cocktail bar, no cheap beers, no pitchers, no bottom of the barrel prices, a cozy dark comfy crafted cocktail bar.” — Gregg Wolfe, discussing plans to re-hatch Nite Owl the city’s lucky to have cutting-edge entrepreneurs like the Wolfe’s. “They are exceptionally innovative,” says MacDonald. “They’re constantly changing their offerings to keep it fresh, giving people a reason to visit and over and over again.” The Wolfe brothers may be seasoned entrepreneurs, but they owe their restaurant roots to rock and roll. They opened their first business, Nite Owl, together on Talbot Street in 2009. The dark and whimsical rock bar became a cult favourite among London’s art scene. “It was a big city hole in the wall bar, maybe a little ahead of its time in 2009,” says Justin. When space opened up next door, they launched Early Bird diner to feed the late-night crowd. Eventually, they transitioned to brunch. Business boomed, so the brothers expanded Early Bird and closed the rock bar. “It became more of a hassle dealing with bar crowds as our Early Bird was exploding,” he adds. “Early Bird during the first two years was the hardest thing I have ever done.” “Nite Owl was more of a get your feet wet business,” says Justin. It was meant to be a small cocktail/bourbon bar, he says, “back then we were new to the business and let the city scene shape the bar into a direction we didn’t plan on going.” Years later the Wolfe’s have plans to re-hatch Nite Owl above the restaurant. It will be an after-hours style rock and roll bar that will be open on Friday and Saturday nights from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. “This time we will run it like we always wanted too, as a bourbon focused proper cocktail bar, no cheap beers, no pitchers, no bottom of the barrel prices, a cozy dark comfy crafted cocktail bar,” says Gregg. The secret back alley entrance gives Nite Owl a unique touch, “almost like a speakeasy.” “This one will be entirely word of mouth,” says Gregg. “We want good people to tell good people, so the vibe stays good. It’ll be the bar we always wanted Nite Owl to be.” In fact, the Wolfe’s credit much of their success to word-of-mouth marketing. They don’t advertise. Instead, they let their creativity and ability deliver a stellar dining experience that speaks for itself. Everything the Wolfe’s create is highly visual. Their meals are colourful and beautifully plated. Their décor is vibrant, unique and Instagram worthy. It’s no wonder in an era full of smart phones and social media hashtags that the buzz surrounding the Wolfe brothers’ eateries keeps building. “People come in, and the cameras come out,” says Gregg. “We want the food to look as good as it tastes.” The other secret weapon behind the Wolfe brother’s evolving success is their growing Wolfe pack. Both Gregg and Justin met their wives, Olivia and Jennifer, through Nite Owl. Jennifer has taken the lead, managing the front of house operations at all three restaurants and has Olivia to manage the day-to-day operations. As the business has grown so have their families. Gregg and Olivia now have a one-yearold and a three-year-old, and Justin and Jennifer are parents to a nine-month-old baby boy. The Wolfe brothers consider their staff a part of their Wolfe pack. They have 75 employees between their three establishments, many of whom are kick-starting their culinary careers in the Wolfe’s various kitchens. “When you get good people you want to hang onto them,” says Justin. He admits that without the support of Wolfe of Wortley’s head chef, Kyle Rose and sous chef, Josh Ward, Gregg and he never would’ve been able to open Los Lobos. “Our lives have completely changed,” says Justin. “We’re all dreaming big together now.” ALEX WEBER BUSINESS SPECIALISTS Bringing Computer Expertise to Our Business Community Serving Businesses in the London &St. Thomas Areas Planning and Consulting for Business Systems Disaster Planning and Recovery Systems Planning and Implementation Database Development and Programming Systems Security Network and Systems Implementation and Support IT Services Outsourcing Training and Instruction Equipment Sales and Service We offer many more value-added services 519-913-3143 info@markit-techsolutions.com www.markit-techsolutions.com “We Do IT Right the First Time” SALES & SERVICE SEPTEMBER 2017 | businesslondon.ca | 19

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    Becoming unsinkable Jodi Anderson-Carson Olympic hero Silken Laumann applauds Fanshawe’s focus on wellness AS FANSHAWE CELEBRATES its 50th anniversary this September, many exciting plans are unfolding. Continuing its motivating RED Talks lecture series, the college welcomes Olympic Rower Silken Laumann to share her inspirational story of triumph over adversity, while swinging open its doors to a state-of-theart Student Wellness Centre offering a comprehensive suite of wellness services. Laumann, who is best-known as a world champion who fought back from a devastating rowing accident to win a bronze medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics, is heartened by Fanshawe’s focus on wellness. Today, as a mental health advocate, she appreciates life balance and shares her personal experience so others can benefit, “I want to help people live better lives, to see their potential and understand that a magical life is possible for each of us.” In her presentation entitled ‘Becoming 20 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 Silken Laumann PHOTO COURTESY OF BETH HAYHURST Unsinkable’, Laumann shines a spotlight on many obstacles she encountered and overcame - both in her athletic life and throughout intense personal challenges. And, she applauds Fanshawe’s proactive new wellness programming for the thousands of students launching a new school year. “We all experience fear and doubt, yet with support, courage, perseverance and a sense of humour - the human spirit prevails, and this centre will serve students well.” Fanshawe wellness director Jodi Anderson-Carson concurs and notes the new centre’s strategic direction delivers supportive options for well-being on four fronts – physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual. “As a wellness hub, ours is a safe, welcoming environment for someone to take a break, reduce stress, get mentally prepared, find friends and make positive lifestyle changes. Beyond a fabulous physical fitness space, our expanded programming meets much broader human needs.” As a unique and innovative campus resource, the remarkable threefloor wellness centre is made possible through a funding partnership with the Fanshawe Student Union and incorporates all campus athletics programming and significant space for a spectrum of health services. In addition to flexible fitness areas for strength training, cardio, group exercise rooms and a climbing wall, the building houses quiet rooms, massage therapy, yoga, meditation and other wellness services to help

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