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Business London Magazine | September2017
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    business LONDON EXCLUSIVE Inside Design House London PLUGGED IN to London’s evolving fitness scene 30 SECONDS with Delta’s Dave Bartlam NEW The Broad Perspective The Wolfe Brothers are shaping how Londoners dine SEPTEMBER 2017 $2.95 PM40064683 businesslondon.ca Creating happiness in the workplace

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    A Daimler Brand Innovation is a beautiful thing. The all-new E-Class Coupe. Masterpiece of Intelligence. The E-Class Coupe combines a sleek, athletic profile with flawless proportions that accommodate four passengers in impeccable comfort. Intelligent technology like PRE-SAFE® and PRE-SAFE® Sound offer advanced protection before, during and after an unavoidable collision. With distinctive styling features and advanced driver systems like these, the E-Class Coupe is a perfect combination of beauty and innovation. © 2017 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. Mercedes-Benz London I 35 Southdale Road East I 866-879-0768 I info@mblondon.com

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    THE GRAYSTONE ADVANTAGE The Ultimate Private Address With Exclusive Detached Condominiums An exclusivecommunity of 44 Many homesfeaturethe ultimate architecturally-designed, luxury privacy of of backing directly onto the the detachedone-floor condominium natural openspace of of Warbler Woods, homes. Located on an elevated while others enjoythe privacy and and ridge,the siteenjoys aprime serenity created by bythelarge spectac- locationbordering thebeautiful ularly landscaped park in inthemiddle and natural environmentofthe of ofthecommunity.Large lots, Warbler Woods permanentopen unmatchedspecs,amazing space,and offering residents an landscaping, prime locations, impressivevistaoverthe west end and agated community! of the city of London. Beautiful! Signature designs craftedbyThe Graystone Team. Call Jean Guest, Sales Manager 519-860-9911 www.theridgeatbyron.ca

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    OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE — SEPTEMBER 2017 www.londonchamber.com Each year the Chamber’s “Voice” Magazine has the opportunity to sit down with the incoming President of the Board of Directors to ask a series of questions about what the membership can expect at the Chamber under their leadership. What follows is a Q & A interview that was conducted this past July. Andrew Schiestel is a Canadian technology and marketing entrepreneur. He built his first website at 15 years old, and has lived and breathed the Internet ever since. Andrew is the president at tbk Creative, a London-based web design and digital marketing agency. In 2017 and 2016, tbk Creative was named “Top Web Design Provider” in London by Consumer Choice Award, and in 2016 as well, the company was named “Small Business of the Year” at the London Chamber of Commerce Business Achievement Awards. Andrew’s articles on digital marketing and the digital economy have appeared in the Financial Post, the Globe and Mail, and the London Free Press. 42 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 INSIDE 18 20 32 Dining with the wolves These indie operators are shaping how Londoners dine COVER STORY Becoming unsinkable Olympic hero Silken Laumann applauds Fanshawe’s focus on wellness The broad perspective Four women talk about assumptions in the workplace September 2017 Volume 18: Issue 11 business LONDON Publisher: Lisa Catania lcatania@postmedia.com 519.667.5480 Managing Editor: Lisa Bucher lbucher@postmedia.com 519.471.2907 x 540281 Sales Manager: Linda Leblanc lleblanc@postmedia.com 519.673.5005 x 516200 Media Sales Consultant: Ilinka Armstrong iarmstrong@postmedia.com 519.673.5005 x 540255 Design/Production Susan Batsford sbatsford@postmedia.com Business London is published monthly at 369 York St., London, ON N6A 4G1 26 The changing face of fitness How attraction and disruption marketing are changing the fitness industry 4 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 34 Matter More Is your strategy driven by what you think about your brand? 35 NEW! Business Events What’s going on this month 36 Building a future How Copp’s maintains a stronghold in a competitive market 39 Lights, cameras, olives! The new host of London Today The Voice . . . of Business Meet Andrew Schiestel President of the Board of Directors 2017/18 42 The Voice of business 168 SUBSCRIBE TODAY. LFPRESS.COM 12,000 copies distributed to businesses in the London/St. Thomas area, including members of the London Chamber of Commerce. Subscriptions: $24 for one year, $37.50 for two, $45 for three (GST included). USA $60 per year (Canadian funds). Reproduction in whole or in part of the editorial or advertising content is forbidden without the written consent of the publisher. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064683 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Business London 369 York St., London, ON N6A 4G1 ISSN 1493-0579 168 Builtontrust.

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    UNIQUE AS YOU UNIQUE AS YOU #SweetSiftonSuites #SweetSiftonSuites STRUT YOUR STYLE… To the open studio. To the glass boardroom. To your favourite falafel joint around the corner. Wherever you go, STRUT YOUR STYLE… To the open studio. To the glass boardroom. you defy the conventional. Let your personal brand take on a life To your favourite falafel joint around the corner. Wherever you go, of its own, in a home of its own. Now that’s suite. you defy the conventional. Let your personal brand take on a life of its own, in a home of its own. Now that’s suite. Custom Suites I Exposed Concrete Finishes I Experienced Partner Custom Suites I Exposed Concrete Finishes I Experienced Partner Downtown Locations Cafés & Restaurants Retail Stores Underground Parking Downtown Locations Cafés & Restaurants 519.434.1000 519.434.1000 Retail Stores Underground Parking Sifton.com Sifton.com RES. IM 200 Queens Ave RES. IM 200 Queens Ave

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    business LONDON Lisa Bucher Managing Editor, Business London I have a great appreciation for the past. Or maybe the way I remember it. I like the idea of receiving a letter by post. Letters can be aesthetically pleasing and can be tucked away to serve as a reminder. I like the idea of camera film and the element of surprise when getting it developed. I like the idea of a life before smartphones because it was simple, less invasive and less demanding of my time. I use running to escape from the stressors of everyday life and in that I know I am not alone. I leave all of my technology, my career, and my personal life behind. I like that I can focus purely on my breath and movement and give an empty mind my undivided attention. In modern day life, that silence is priceless. Last year I hired a personal trainer. The reason was to increase my muscle mass to improve my running stamina. However, I soon saw the benefits to the social side of fitness. I had someone to pick me up if I fell off the fitness wagon. I had someone to add variety to my routine so that I wouldn’t get bored. She was efficient with my time for optimal results and kept me motivated. I began to look forward to our time together With a personal trainer, my connection was face-to-face. However, I was able to imagine some of the benefits to being connected to mobile fitness apps and other types of social fitness enhancing technologies, such as Fitbit or MYZONE MZ-3. That being said, I still disconnect. Much like social technology to the fitness industry, the purpose of Business London magazine to the business community is to inform, to entertain and to inspire. I have always loved the look and feel of a printed magazine. I love its simplicity. I can take it to the beach. I can rip out a page and stick it to my wall. I can make notes on the pages. I lose it. It gets wet. No big deal. Although I appreciate the past, I am still very much a modern woman. I rely heavily on my GPS and social media for personal and professional interaction. So I also see the benefit to telling stories digitally, to ensure content will reach more people, faster, and to add a variety of media to storytelling. As we publish the second issue of our rebranded product, I am mindful of the magazine’s past success, but remain confident that refreshing it with new content and taking advantage of the many new technologies is essential. I’ve been working in magazines for a while and dreamt of working for them almost as long. As managing editor of Business London, I will continue to shape the magazine into the kind of publication that businesses will enjoy reading. As the magazine continues to evolve, you will continue to see changes to the pages, as well as an increased online presence. I plan for the magazine to look and feel more like a consumer product with B2B content. As our valued readership, I encourage you to contact us with feedback and ideas for content. Watch for us on Rogers TV mid-September and follow us on Facebook. We will be starting some Facebook Live. LBUCHER@POSTMEDIA.COM 6 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017

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    our biggest season ever ONCE a christmas carol silence blind date a thousand splendid suns chariots offire ronnie burkett’s the daisy theatre what a young wife ought to know the glass menagerie Join us! Season packages for as little as $99 2017/18

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    Marilyn Sinclair GETTING STARTED The ups and downs of getting going in business Happiness in the workplace Why your culture might be worth more than the best business plan CULTURE HAS BEEN long celebrated, but is a misunderstood term in business. In recent years, what was previously considered ‘job perks’ have become expectations in emerging companies. While every company should have its unique expression of culture, there’s a lot more to it than open concept office spaces, flex work, corporate yoga, nap pods, standing desks, catered lunches, self-care allowances, office pets, foosball tournaments, innovation, or ‘20%’ time. Culture begins at the top. Whether intentional or not, it’s often a founder’s entrepreneurial values that trickle down and directly influence a company’s culture, setting what can be a longstanding, though possibly less strategic, standard within the organization. Whether collaborative, competitive, conservative, risk-averse or riskembracing, every business has its unique mix of drivers and values, that defines the people they hire. It will also prescribe the goals they set and how they manage to them. When an employee loves what they do and wants to go to work every morning, it will show in their results. This common piece of wisdom is deceivingly simple. American research and consulting leader, Gallup, has found that a staggering 87 per cent of employees worldwide are not engaged in their workplace environment. This is because culture is not merely about what feels right, but what is needed to grow. When employees understand why you exist and buy-in to your mission, vision, and values, they will be more satisfied, more motivated, and better able to deliver on your brand promise. Intentional cultural development is what allows some companies to easily outperform their peers, at a rate of 147 per cent in earnings per share according to Gallup. Online retailer Zappos is one example of a company that understands this. With a first interview dedicated entirely to cultural fit, and carrying half the weight in an actual job offer, it’s safe to say the company takes its culture seriously. All new hires, no matter what their job description is, spend their first couple weeks in the call centre learning about the Zappos customer and the essence of the brand. After they’ve logged their call centre hours, Zappos offers each trainee $2,000 to leave the company if they don’t feel that Zappos is the right fit for them. Zappos recognizes that their employees are their greatest ambassadors and want a team that is committed to the goals, culture, and values of the organization, right from the beginning. This approach has paid off. With annual revenues more than $2 billion and 75 per cent of sales from repeat customers, it appears that Zappos employees work, live, and breathe the company’s core values. Satisfied employees, who are brought in and coached to attain the knowledge, goals and tools to create an exceptional customer experience, are worth as much as the best business plan. To achieve these goals an intentional focus on culture has to begin at the beginning and not you’re your company has matured. This includes a direct link from your strategy to your culture to your hiring practices, and to your performance management systems. Marilyn Sinclair is president & CEO of TechAlliance, the regional innovation centre for London and Southwestern Ontario. 8 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017

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    AD{TS5400543} LEGAL MOMENT Do youhavetopay childsupport forachild attendinguniversity? 1. If thechild is living at home,you normallywill be required to continue paying childsupportatthe same levelyou have been. 2. If thechild is notlivingathome, childsupportwillbe reviewed andanew amount will likely be determined, taking into accountareasonablecontributionfrom thechild. 3. Thereare anumberofwaysthatchild supportcan be calculated forachild living away from home and it is best to consultwithalawyer to review the availableoptions. 4. This applies notonlytouniversitybut to most forms of post-secondary education. ABOUTKEN •BorninBramptonand attended Western University •VolunteerswithYouth Opportunities Unlimited, helping troubled teensand homelessyouths •Married andhas twochildren •Loves cheering forthe Blue Jays •Enjoys floorhockey, baseball andgolf KenFraser Kenpractisesexclusively in family lawincluding theareas of custody,supportpaymentsand division of property. London Kitchener Sarnia Chatham 519-672-9330 226-476-4444 519-344-2020 226-494-1034 www.CohenHighley.com

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    Meet Dave Bartlam The new director of sales and marketing at the Delta London Armouries 10 | businesslondon.ca | SEPTEMBER 2017 DAVE BARTLAM, the new director of sales and marketing at the Delta London Armouries, wants to meet you. He wants to know how your business ticks, your hospitality needs, and your plans for the future. Meeting you and shaking your hand has never been more important, he believes, especially in the noisy and often distracting world of the modern sales and marketing industry. “It’s the people that make this business great. I encourage my team every day to make it personal, to know our customers, their needs, to add the personal touch.” Bartlam’s personal touches are subtle and effective. He stops our interview at one point to help a customer operate a finicky espresso maker. Moments later, he offers condolences to a woman who had just lost her father, insisting that she ask him or a staff member if there’s something she needs. In the elevator going down to the Armouries’ iconic lobby, Bartlam mentions the importance of meeting guests and learning why they’re visiting. It’s about building loyalty and trust. “It’s not always business trips and weddings,” he says, referring to the grieving daughter. He mentions that some guests stay 100 plus nights a year while on business, away from their family. He encourages his sales team of five, along with the entire hotel staff, to get to know the customer – their favourite wines, foods and habits. It’s an effort, says Bartlam, to “deliver without the guest having to ask.” As the hospitality and hotel industry adapts to the increase in competition from Airbnb, along with the customer review-driven world of online travel agencies such as Trivago and Hotels. com, the human touches are what keeps the traditional hotel a viable and thriving business. Bartlam insists that the key to the future success of the hotel industry is to know the value of the services only a hotel can provide. “Online travel agencies are part of our business now. We work closely with them, they’re convenient, and the demographic that they attract (millennials and budget-conscious travelers) will only help grow our business. When it comes to Airbnb, it’s all about knowing what we deliver. We’ll park your car, make your bed. The water will be hot and your room comfortable. We offer total comfort. That’s our business. You can take your chances with an Airbnb.” Bartlam’s new tenure at the Armouries is a return, of sorts. Having grown up in London, he left after high school, riding a full tennis scholarship to the University of Alabama in Huntsville, where he studied business and marketing. There, he met his wife, Lara. The couple has three daughters, Caity, Anna and Lilly. After university in 1995, he became the director of sales at the Oakwood Resort in Grand Bend, where he stayed until the opportunity at Delta presented itself. PATRICK MORLEY

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