Topics
Publishers
Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
Flordia Music Director November 2017
Magazines | Arts / Music 2017-10-27 09:51:33
Page 1 of 5
  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 1

    Quality & Suitability: Pillars of Effective Repertoire Selection Addressing Diversity in the Classroom PLUS Prelude to the 2018 Professional Development Conference

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 2

    2 Florida Music Director

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 3

    Executive Director Florida Music Education Association Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632 (kdsanz@FloridaMusicEducation.org) Editor-in-Chief Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD Southeastern University College of Arts & Media 1000 Longfellow Blvd., BVE 114 Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5104 (office) (mabelfast@seu.edu) Editorial Committee Terice Allen (850) 245-8700, Tallahassee (tallen1962@hotmail.com) Judy Arthur, PhD Leon High School, Tallahassee (850) 488-1971 (arthurj@leonperformingarts.org) William Bauer, PhD University of Florida, Gainesville (352) 273-3182; (wbauer@ufl.edu) Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 645-1438; (aadarrow@fsu.edu) Jeanne Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Largo (727) 588-6055; (reynoldsj@pcsb.org) John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College, Fort Pierce (772) 462-7810; (johnsouthall@FloridaMusicEducation.org) Advertising Sales Valeria Anderson (val@FloridaMusicEducation.org) Richard Brown (richard@FloridaMusicEducation.org) 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 Official FMEA and FMD Photographers Bob O’Lary Debby Stubing Art Director & Production Manager Lori Danello Roberts, LDR Design Inc. (ldrdesign@comcast.net) Circulation & Copy Manager Valeria Anderson, (800) 301-3632 Copy Editor Susan Trainor Contents November 2017 • Volume 71 • Number 4 F E AT U R E S Addressing Diversity in the Classroom. ......... 10 FBA President-Elect Candidates. ........... 14-15 Making a Difference Every Day. ............. 16 2017-2018 FMEA & FSMA Officers. .......... 18 Quality & Suitability: Pillars of Effective Repertoire Selection . .................... 20 FMEA Summer Institute ................. 22 . Prelude to the 2018 FMEA Professional Development Conference How Do I Get to the Conference?. ................ 25 Conference Registration . .................... 26 Conference Hotels. ....................... 27 Policies and Procedures. .................... 28 College Night. ......................... 30 FMEA Preconference ..................... 31 All-State Rehearsals . ...................... 32 President’s Message. ......... 5 Advocacy Report. ........... 6 Advertisers’ Index. .......... 7 Share Your Success. ......... 8 Thank You, Donors. ........ 34 Component News. ......... 36 DEPARTMENTS Research Puzzles for Music Teachers............ 40 Committee Reports. ........ 41 Academic Partners. ........ 44 Corporate Partners. ........ 45 Executive Director’s Notes. .. 46 Officers and Directors. ..... 47 November 2017 3

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 4

    4 Florida Music Director

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 5

    President’sMessage Keep on Keeping on Kenneth Williams, PhD President Florida Music Education Association “If you were able to fall a hundred times as a child and rise, you are able to fall a thousand times as a grown up and soar.” – Matshona Dhliwayo I am forever reminded and encouraged by the resilience and generosity of mankind. In the wake of horrendous and sometimes catastrophic circumstances, I see fellow citizens band together and reach out a helping hand to others in need. In the aftermath of our recent hurricanes and the horrific violence in Las Vegas, I have repeatedly observed the goodness of the people with whom I share this earth, often, strangers putting themselves in harm’s way to help and protect others. It is my hope that you and yours are safe and well, and I encourage each of us to make an effort to support and care for those in need. I think it is important to remember that our classrooms and music making might just be a safe haven for our students who may need reassurance and healing. And remember that our classrooms and music making are a safe haven for us as well. “The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.” – William Arthur Ward (Thank you, Andy Dubbert, for sharing this quote when I was most in need. –KW) The 2018 FMEA Professional Development Conference — Artistry: Teaching & Performing will feature Allan McMurray as our keynote speaker at the general session on Thursday, January 11. Professor of conducting emeritus at the University of Colorado, McMurray is internationally acclaimed for his interpretive and expressive artistry, and his insight will, I guarantee, be inspirational. Also at the general session, we will experience exceptional artistry through a performance by the Akropolis Reed Quintet. Founded in 2009 at the University of Michigan, the quintet is the first-ever ensemble of its makeup to win a Fischoff Gold Medal (2014) as well as Grand Prize at the Plowman and MTNA national competitions. The group was hailed by Fanfare Magazine for its “imagination, infallible musicality, and huge vitality.” You must not miss this incredible session. Wednesday’s FMEA Preconference will begin with the keynote: Artistry in Teaching presented by Dr. Clifford Madsen, the Robert O. Lawton distinguished professor of music at the College of Music, Florida State University. The Precon will also include: «« Artistry in Nontraditional Music Settings David Williams, Carlos Silva, Nick Stefanic, Micky Polley «« Prism Performances That Pop! Ernesta Suarez-Chicklowski, Tracy Lisi, Jonathan Casanas, Fiorella Tangherlini «« Should We Work Harder or Teach Differently? Judy Bowers, Robert Clark The Wednesday evening President’s Concert will feature: «« Satellite High School Chamber Orchestra — Christopher Simons, Conductor «« Sebring High School Varsity Choir — Zachary Thompson, Conductor «« Douglas Anderson School of the Arts Wind Symphony — Ted Shistle, Conductor Make plans now to include the Wednesday FMEA Preconference and the President’s Concert in your January conference experience. You will have to see the complete conference schedule to wrap your head around the enormity of possibilities for learning and growth through clinic sessions, performances, industry exhibits and sharing with your colleagues. Last year’s conference hosted 11,000 participants and visitors … you don’t want to miss this valuable experience. By the way, bring your colleagues. I’ll see you in Tampa. Kenneth Williams, PhD, President Florida Music Education Association November 2017 5

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 6

    AdvocacyReport Time to Put on Your Ruby Slippers tool with our Summer Institute participants that I still use to this day. It is called the Personal Innovation Portfolio. It has three sections focused on shaping actions to inspire real, sustainable, transformative change. I propose that we use these steps to shape our advocacy efforts in these uncertain times. “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.” This famous line from the 1939 classic movie The Wizard of Oz comes to mind as I work on advocacy issues in today’s peculiar political environment. Just like Dorothy stepping into the unfamiliar land of Oz, government relations strategies that were once effective seem out of place in this highly polarized and charged political world. Calling or emailing legislators seems almost quaint in the age of political super PACs, fake news and transactional politics. Decision makers have always bargained with one another to get the work done, i.e., if you support bill X, I will support bill Y. This is not new. In the past, however, by the time X and Y passed, these bills would have been through committees and included compromises. The 6 Florida Music Director bills that actually passed might bear little resemblance to the original bills filed. This democratic process is messy and imperfect for sure, but at least the process includes many voices. Winston Churchill said it best, “Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others.” Today it is not uncommon for bills to be much more transactional and to pass strictly along party lines. Bills X and Y often pass as a result of transactions among legislators and the governor, with much less input from stakeholders. Given this unusual political climate, it is tempting to become discouraged and to disengage from advocacy or government relations. That would be a huge mistake. Years ago, my friend and mentor David O’Fallon, president of the Minnesota Humanities, shared an effective planning 2017-2018 ADVOCACY PERSONAL INNOVATION PORTFOLIO Section 1 - Duh (can do it now) Collect stories about the power of music education to transform lives. These stories are very useful and powerful when advocating, regardless of the political climate. «« Every FMEA member is challenged to provide one story in any creative format. Keep in my mind our very rich media world when capturing the story. «« If using video, keep it short (60 to 90 seconds preferably, three minutes maximum). Use pictures with text. «« Our political system is in dire need of a dose of humanity. Music and the arts have transformative power to bring people together. These stories will help. «« You can use these stories locally, and we can use them at the state level. Section 2 - Wow (really exciting; takes some prep) Become engaged in the 2018 Florida legislative elections. «« The term for the House of Representatives is only two years. If we were more engaged in these elections, we could have a powerful impact on the legislative agenda.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 7

    Jeanne W. Reynolds, Chairwoman Government Relations Committee «« All state representative offices will be on the ballot in 2018. «« Senate seats in even numbered districts will be on the ballot. «« Learn who is running in your legislative district. « « Do your homework on your current legislators. How did they vote on education issues in the past? Hold legislators accountable for their past votes. «« Ask questions of the candidates, meet with them, go to forums. Just asking a question about arts education puts the topic on their radar. Section 3 - OMG (game changers) Run for office or recruit another music educator or strong arts candidate to run for office. Qualifying deadline is June 22, 2018. «« Music educators have large social networks due to the hundreds and even thousands of lives we touch. This is a built-in voting bloc. «« Music educators bring a unique skill set to this job. We know how to bring a group of diverse human beings together for the common cause of making music. We know about leadership, team building and compromise. These are the skills a successful legislator needs. It is time for us to step up and run. I challenge all FMEA members to commit to the work outlined on this Personal Innovation Portfolio. Don’t be discouraged. We may feel as if we are not in Kansas anymore, but like Dorothy, if we put on our ruby slippers, maybe the music education dreams we dare to dream will come true. Advertisers’ Index The Florida Music Director is made possible by the participation of the following businesses whose advertisements appear in this issue. They make it possible to provide you with a high-quality publication, and we gratefully acknowledge their support of our mission. We hope you will take special notice of these advertisements and consider the products and services offered. It is another important way you can support your professional association and the enhancement of Florida music education. The publisher does not endorse any particular company, product or service. The Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) is not responsible for the content of any advertisement and reserves the right to accept or refuse any advertisement submitted for publication. Information for advertisers (rate card, insertion orders, graphics requirements, etc.) can be found at FloridaMusicEducation.org. ADVERTISERS Florida Atlantic University.......................................................................................... BC Florida Gulf Coast University.......................................................................................4 Stetson University.................................................................................................... 12-13 University of Central Florida.........................................................................................4 University of Florida..................................................................................................IFC Advertisers shown in bold provide additional support to FMEA members through their membership in the Corporate and Academic Partners program. These advertisers deserve your special recognition and attention. SUBSCRIPTIONS: Direct correspondence regarding subscriptions to: Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education, 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL, 32301-2757. Subscription cost included in FMEA membership dues ($9); libraries, educational institutions and all others within the United States: $27 plus 7.5% sales tax. CIRCULATION: 4,500 educators. Published eight times annually by The Florida Music Education Association, Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education: 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757. FMEA reserves the right to approve any application for appearance and to edit all materials proposed for distribution. Permission is granted to all FMEA members to reprint articles from the Florida Music Director for non-commercial, educational purposes. Non-members may request permission from the FMEA office. SUBMISSIONS: Article and art submissions are always considered and should be submitted on or before the 1st of the month, one month prior to the publication issue to: Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD, mabelfast@seu.edu. All articles must be provided in digital format (e.g., Microsoft Word). All applicable fonts and images must be provided. Images must be at least 300 dpi resolution at 100 percent of the size. All submissions must be accompanied by a proof (color, if applicable). Ads may be submitted via email to valanderson@FloridaMusicEducation.org. Florida Music Director reserves the right to refuse any ad not prepared to the correct specifications OR to rework the ad as needed with fees applied. 2017-18 FMEA Membership: You are eligible for membership in The Florida Music Education Association if you are an individual engaged in the teaching, supervision or administration of music in elementary and secondary schools, colleges or universities within the state. Visit FloridaMusicEducation.org to learn more about the benefits of active membership. November 2017 7

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 8

    ShareYourSuccess 2017 All-National Honor Ensembles November 26-29, 2017, Orlando, Florida The students listed below will join the best of the best for the National Association for Music Education’s (NAfME) 2017 All-National Honor Ensembles, November 26-29, at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort at Walt Disney World in Orlando. The Jazz Band and Mixed Choir concerts will take place 7:30 pm to 9 pm on November 28, and the Concert Band and Symphony Orchestra concerts will begin at 10 am on November 29, in the ballrooms at Disney Coronado Springs Resort. The concerts are free and open to the public. Tickets are not required. Concert Band Student Instrument School Teacher Brandon Collins Tenor Saxophone Auburndale High School Hannah Haugen Nathaniel David-Picart Horn Merritt Island High School Benjamin Gerrard Amanda Green* Clarinet Paul J. Hagerty High School Brad Kuperman Andrew Colón* Tuba Pace High School Anthony Denaro Tacy Colón* Clarinet Pace High School Anthony Denaro Joseph Chiet Bassoon American Heritage School (Broward; High School) Kimberly Imerbsin Chris Nelson* Bass Clarinet Ponte Vedra High School Jermaine Reynolds Matthew Strickland Trumpet Lincoln High School Daniel Rosman Amber Lo Clarinet Hillsborough Senior High School Michael Lebrias Casey Marden Trumpet Tavares High School Andrew Dubbert Lance Lunceford Trombone Vero Beach High School Page Howell 8 Florida Music Director

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 9

    Photos at left from the 2016 All-National Honor Ensembles at Gaylord Texan Resort, Grapevine, Texas Symphony Orchestra Student Instrument School Teacher Benjamin Gibson Trumpet Douglas Anderson School of the Arts Ted Shistle Sophia Bracken Clarinet Jensen Beach High School Thomas Dougherty Soyoun Choi* Viola Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy Lorie Wacaster Yoosang Park Violin West Shore Junior/Senior High School Maureen Fallon Zaria Graves* Viola Coral Reef Senior High School Lee Stone Jakob Schoenfeld* Percussion/Timpani Paul J. Hagerty High School Brad Kuperman Bing Gu Bassoon Seminole High School Andrea Newhouse Odessa Deng Violin Lawton Chiles High School Christopher Miller Julia Jin Violin Lawton Chiles High School Christopher Miller Erin Kim Violin Lawton Chiles High School Christopher Miller Gregory Harvey* French Horn Paul R. Wharton High School Justin Swaim Brenton Zhang Cello Winter Park High School Laurie Bitters Jazz Ensemble Student Instrument School Teacher Summer Camargo Trumpet Dillard High School Christopher Dorsey Miles Lennox Piano Dillard High School Christopher Dorsey Mick Pepper Trombone Tavares High School Andrew Dubbert Mixed Choir Student Part School Teacher Rena Cohen* Soprano 2 Eastside High School Diana Rollo Shreya Pathak Soprano 2 Eastside High School Diana Rollo Savannah Schleich Soprano 2 East Bay High School Brian Nesmith Jayden Browne Bass 1 Douglas Anderson School of the Arts Jeffrey Clayton Marialaura Pellegrino Alto 1 Osceola County School for the Arts Lisa Testa Sebastian Rojas* Tenor 2 New World School of the Arts Leslie Denning Justus Evans Bass 2 Lake Minneola High School Terri Jo Fox Madalyn Tomkins* Soprano 2 Olympia High School Janet Le Nathaniel Rich Tenor 2 Gulliver Preparatory School Ron Castonguay Dylan Olster Bass 2 American Heritage School Nina Vanderhoof Noah KeYes* Bass 1 Keswick Christian School Chanda Mangiaracina Sarah DeNavarra* Alto 1 Keswick Christian School Chanda Mangiaracina Benjamin Graham* Tenor 1 Berkeley Preparatory School Carrie Dietsch Nicholas Hinson Bass 1 Howard W. Blake High School Joseph Galezcka Noah Zaidspiner* Tenor 2 Wellington High School Bradford Chase * Member of the Tri-M Music Honor Society November 2017 9

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 10

    Addressing Diversity in the Classroom A Preview of 2018 Conference Sessions My goal as an educator is that my students will one day contribute positively to our pluralistic society. As music educators, they likely will teach students who represent the broad diversity found in many of our Florida communities. The term diversity has a wide array of definitions. These definitions can affect the ways teachers understand and employ the term, as well as the ways in which they approach sociocultural differences in their classrooms (Silverman, 2010). Affirming diversity means that we recognize and accept all its forms: LGBT, disability, race, ethnicity, immigration status, age, gender and class. The 2018 FMEA Professional Development Conference will include a number of sessions devoted to teaching for diversity and tolerance in the music classroom. Topics included in these sessions will be teaching students who are homeless or transgender, and teaching students with profound disabilities or hearing loss. These topics were chosen based on recent demographic trends in our schools. Students Who Are Homeless A recent article (Santich, 2017) in the Orlando Sentinel stated that “nearly onefifth of all homeless public-school students across the state now live in central Florida—Orange, Osceola or Seminole counties—a fact some blame on the combination of cheap, rent-by-the-week motels and high turnover at low-paying tourism-industry jobs.” With only one-tenth of the state’s total population, the tri-county area identified more than 13,700 homeless students last year, including families doubled up with relatives, living in motels, staying in shelters, sleeping in cars or camping in the woods. The actual number may be twice as high as parents are sometimes wary of revealing their living situation. Mark Waltrip, who is behind an effort to employ homeless parents and get their children into permanent housing, said no student in the tri-county region can escape the issue. “If your child goes to a public school anywhere in Central Florida, the odds are almost guaranteed that one of their classmates is homeless,” he said. Christina Savino, the homeless education program specialist in Orange County, said that students experiencing homelessness have dramatically increased absenteeism, lower test scores and, often, months of “academic recovery time” whenever they change schools. Their chances of earning a diploma also plummet. When we were music students, many of us thought of the band, orchestra or chorus room as our home away from home. The music classroom was a community of learners who seemed more like family. Brandon Boyd, assistant professor at the University of Missouri, will discuss the impact of homelessness and ways to use music to build community and support for students who are experiencing homelessness. Transgender Students Transgender is a general term used to describe students (and others) whose gender identity differs from the sex they were assigned at birth. It is our responsibility as teachers to make the music classroom a safe learning environment for all students. Teachers’ attitudes toward diversity are often reflected in their teaching and may be transparent to students. Effective teachers acknowledge students’ differences, identify these differences positively and provide support to students in the classroom. Unfortunately, most teachers have had no training in how best to support transgender students. Teachers’ attitudes toward transgender students likely affect their interactions with these students. Silveira and Goff (2016) conducted a study to measure music teachers’ attitudes toward transgender individuals and toward school practices that support transgender students. Their results indicated that music educators had fairly positive attitudes toward transgender students. Analyses also revealed that music educators’ gender and political views on social issues significantly predicted their attitudes toward transgender individuals and toward supportive school practices. Female music educators had more positive attitudes than did males, and educators identifying as more socially liberal had more positive attitudes than did 10 Florida Music Director

Page 1 of 5

Please wait