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Rhino Times - 2017-05-11
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-05-11 00:00:00
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    Vol. V No. 19 Greensboro, North Carolina www.rhinotimes.com Thursday, May 11, 2017 plus Under The Hammer, Uncle Orson Reviews Everything AND MORE

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    2 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com THE WEEKLY Hammer Council Settles by John Hammer The Greensboro City Council made two major mistakes at its meeting on Tuesday, May 2, which are likely to haunt the city for years. First, the City Council allowed Nelson Johnson and his minions to take over a meeting and run the City Council off the dais and into the back room like scared rabbits. Johnson now knows that he has the power to take over a meeting anytime he on Costing City Money wants. It effectively takes the power to determine the course of meetings out of the hands of the mayor and hands it over to Johnson. The second mistake is going to, in the long run, cost the taxpayers of Greensboro millions of dollars. The City Council, by a 6-to-3 vote, agreed to pay Dejuan Yourse $95,000 for getting caught by the police after it appeared he was trying to break into his mother’s house. Every person who gets arrested by the Greensboro police can now cry foul, and if they can find a flaw in the way the police handled the arrest the City Council is going to give them money. It was an extremely shortsighted decision to settle the case rather than going to court. The argument was that it was cheaper to pay Yourse $95,000 than it was to spend an estimated $300,000 or $400,000 going to court, where the city might not win. But in the long run spending that $300,000 to $400,000 sends a message that someone had better have a really good case before taking on the City of Greensboro. The settlement sends the message that if you file suit against the city, then the city will give you money. The city already has several other cases pending. And although the vote was 6 to 3, only one of those three votes was against the settlement. The other two didn’t like some unusual terms in the settlement but didn’t disagree with paying Yourse. So essentially the vote was 8 to 1 to pay Yourse $95,000. This decision makes it easy. The victim has to hire a lawyer to say they are going to sue for some outrageous amount and then settle for what they can get. Officer Travis Cole in the Yourse incident may have overreacted. But if you go back and look at the video and consider some of the things that have been revealed after the incident, Cole’s instincts were on target. First of all, we now know that Yourse was not going to continue to sit on his mother’s porch after the police checked him out. He was going to jail. He was asked if he had any outstanding warrants or papers and he said “No” the first time he was asked, and “Not that I know of” the second time. He did have outstanding warrants, and as soon as Officer Charlotte Jackson ran his driver’s license through the system she would have found that there were warrants for his arrest and he would be arrested and taken downtown. If you watch the police body- (continued on page 33) Illegal on Tuesday, Legal on Wednesday? by John Hammer The duplicity of the four members of the Greensboro City Council who held a press conference on Wednesday, May 3 to divulge information about the Jose Charles video is disturbing but not shocking. At the City Council meeting on Tuesday evening, May 2, all members of the City Council – with the exception of Councilmember Yvonne Johnson – had watched as much of the body-worn camera videos of the Charles incident as they needed to make a decision. Johnson was the only councilmember who went into closed session on Wednesday to watch more videos. So eight of the nine members of the City Council knew what their decision was on the Charles case at the City Council meeting on May 2. Charles was arrested near Center City Park on July 4, 2016, after a series of fights broke out in the park. He was 15 at the time. Nelson Johnson and others have raised questions about the arrest and accused the police officers involved of police brutality. At the May 2 meeting, the City Council faced 150 people who were intensely interested in the case. The City Council had made its decision, yet with all of the advocates for Charles in the room, the city councilmembers hid behind the court order that prevented them from making a statement about the videos they had watched. The court ordered the City Council not to talk about the videos because Charles was a juvenile when he was arrested. It’s easy to see why the City Council hid behind the court order, because the people in the room wanted the City Council to take action and the majority of the City Council had decided not to take any action and to let the Charles case go forward. Announcing that decision at the meeting would have been highly unpopular, so the City Council punted and claimed that they could not say anything because of the court order. But on Wednesday, in front of a select group of media who were notified or found out about the press conference, Mayor Nancy Vaughan and Councilmembers Marikay Abuzuaiter, Nancy Hoffmann and Justin Outling deemed that the restrictions on speaking about the videos no longer applied and they could make a statement about their decision to uphold the findings and conclusions of the city manager and police chief. The findings of the city manager and police chief have not been officially released, but the city manager and police chief found that no disciplinary action should be taken against the police officers making the arrest. In essence, that no laws or city policies were violated. The judge’s order had not changed. If it was illegal for the mayor and city councilmembers to talk about their decision on Tuesday night, as they said, then it was illegal on Wednesday afternoon. Outling did want to make a statement about the council’s decision to uphold the findings and conclusions of the city manager and the police chief at the Tuesday, May 2 City Council meeting after everyone had been forced to leave the building and the City Council chambers were empty. But the majority of the City Council wanted to adjourn without making a statement, so that is what happened. Outling, who is an attorney, said that in his opinion his statement concerning the City Council’s decision about what action to take after viewing the police body-worn camera videos of the arrest of Charles did not violate the judge’s order not to speak about the video. City Councilmember Mike Barber, who is also an attorney, strongly disagreed. Barber said that the City Council was ordered not to talk about the video and the statements made by Vaughan, Outling, Hoffmann and Abuzuaiter violated that order. The City Council can’t have it both ways. If the court order not to talk about the video outside of closed session means that they can’t talk about the video then four councilmembers should not have held a press conference to talk about the video. If the City Council can in fact talk about the video, the time to do it was when the council chambers were full of people who came to talk about the case, having not had the privilege of viewing the video.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 3

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    4 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com RHINO SHORTS by John Hammer Editor The Rhino Times will hold its Country Club Schmoozefest on Thursday, May 25 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Starmount Forest Country Club at 1 Sam Sneed Drive. Those who sign in and wear a name tag are welcome to enjoy free hors d’oeuvres and beer and wine (while supplies last). City Councilmember Mike Barber is asking for a significant raise for police officers to be included in this year’s budget. According to a list of salaries of North Carolina police officers, Greensboro, at $49,627, is 11th on the list behind Gastonia, Charlotte, High Point, Winston-Salem, Cary, Raleigh, Salisbury, Kannapolis, Asheville and Concord. It makes sense for Greensboro to be losing police officers to nearby cities that pay more and where the city councils are not making constant judgment calls on their behavior. News & Record Editorial Page Editor Allen Johnson complains in his column Sunday, May 7 that the police body-worn camera video of the arrest of Jose Charles was not made available to the public. He conveniently ignores the fact that Jose Charles was a juvenile when he was arrested, and in this state juvenile court records are sealed. The dominant opinion both on the left and the right is that juveniles deserve protection so that misbehavior as a child doesn’t curse them for life. Johnson from his column doesn’t agree and must believe juvenile records should be public just like the criminal records of adults. It’s an opinion that is difficult to understand or to justify. The criminal justice system isn’t perfect, but it does do some things right and one of those is keeping juvenile criminal court records sealed. Looking at the graphic for a story about the French election, I noticed there are 500 euro bills. Right now that would be worth about $543. We no longer have $500 bills, but what it made me wonder is what in the world someone would do with a 500 euro bill in Portugal. The Muse and I visit Portugal every chance we get, and one of the things I always have to adjust to is the lack of change in the country. We were at a toll booth and, when we tried to pay an 11 euro toll with a 20 euro bill, we were politely asked if we didn’t have anything smaller. The only thing a toll booth does is collect money and give change, and they didn’t want to give us 9 euros in change. Which makes me wonder if I invested in a 500 euro bill if I could eat, drink and drive for free because no one would have enough change. State government is kind of funny. First the governor introduces his budget, which is routinely ignored by everyone. Then either the House or the Senate introduces its budget, which becomes the model for the real budget. The House and Senate alternate producing the budget first. This year it fell to the Senate so the budget introduced this week in the Senate is probably pretty close to what will pass the legislature, be vetoed by Gov. Roy Cooper and then passed again to override the veto. Count on us to keep you on the go with our expert service and the long-lasting value of MICHELIN ® tires. More miles. With the safety you expect. THE NEW MICHELIN ® DEFENDER ® TIRE. Taylor’s Discount Tire 2100 E. Cone Blvd STOP IN TODAY! Fair, honest pricing Family owned and operated TAYLORSDISCOUNTTIRE.COM (336) 375-8883 MON - FRI 7:30 - 5:30, SAT 6:00 - 12:30 NO HIDDEN TIRE INSTALLATION FEES NO HIDDEN TPMS RESET FEES FREE ROTATION AND BALANCE FOR LIFE OF TIRES Life never stops moving. So take on every mile – and be there for every moment – with Michelin’s longest-lasting tire. * * Based on commissioned third-party wear test results in tire size 225/55R17 97H vs. Goodyear® Assurance® TripleTred™ All-Season and Continental® TrueContact™ tires in size 225/55R17 97H, and Pirelli® P4™ Four Seasons+ tire in size 225/55R17 97T, on a 2016 Chevrolet Malibu; and in tire size 205/55R16 91H vs. Bridgestone® Turanza™ Serenity Plus tire in size 205/55R16 91H on a 2015 Honda Civic. Actual on-road results may vary. Copyright © 2017 Michelin North America, Inc. All rights reserved. The Michelin Man is a registered trademark owned by Michelin North America, Inc. TAYLOR'S DISCOUNT TIRE

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 5 table of CONTENTS 2 WEEKLY HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 6 GREENSBORO’S WEALTHIEST 27 ASK CAROLYN BY CAROLYN WOODRUFF 35 UNDER THE HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 17 REAL ESTATE 22 UNCLE ORSON BY ORSON SCOTT CARD 23 SENATE CUTS TAXES, RAISES TEACHER PAY BY JOHN HAMMER 24 SHELTER MIDDLE OF PACK IN EUTHANASIA BY SCOTT D. YOST 25 YOST COLUMN BY SCOTT D. YOST 4 RHINO SHORTS 18 NYT CROSSWORD 19 CHILDREN’S SCHEDULE 21 THE SOUND OF THE BEEP 26 SUDOKU 28 NEWS OF THE WEIRD 29 PUZZLE ANSWERS 30 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR HARDWOOD LAMINATE AREA RUGS CARPET VINYL TILE 336-288-6643 336-288-6643 Cover by Anthony Council Any Size Rooms! PUBLISHER Roy Carroll EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John Hammer managing editor ELAINE HAMMER GENERAL MANAGER Joann Zollo creative director ANTHONY COUNCIL INCLUDES Installation! Pad! Moving Furniture! Take Up & Disposal! county editor SCOTT D. YOST contributing editor ORSON SCOTT CARD advertising consultants DONNA GOODWIN TYE SINGLETON 216 West Market Street, Greensboro NC 27401 P.O. Box 9023, Greensboro NC 27429 | (336) 763-4170 (336) 763-2585 fax | sales@rhinotimes.com | www.rhinotimes.com Mobile Showroom A + This sale can not be combined with any other offers. See store for details. Call Today & We’re On Our Way! 1 Year Interest Free Financing! on approved credit Area’s Largest selection of Pet Friendly flooring 1yr INTEREST FREE financing on approved credit Greensboro • Wilmington • Myrtle Beach 336-288-6643 2837 Battleground Avenue, Greensboro • Mon-Fri 8am-6pm • Sat 10am-4pm

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    6 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Greensboro’s Wealthiest Greensboro went through a transformative period right around the beginning of the 20th century. Railroads were one reason. It was the major method of transporting goods and people, and Greensboro was at a crossroads with rail lines running east and west, north and south. You might say Gov. John Motely Morehead, who lived at Blandwood, brought the railroads and the railroads brought the Cone brothers, Moses and Ceasar – and they brought industry and wealth. At the same time the Cones were establishing Greensboro as a textile manufacturing center, Lunsford Richardson was making home remedies in his drug store on South Elm Street. One of those remedies became Vicks VapoRub, and Vick Chemical Co. became Richardson-Vicks. A few years later, Jefferson Standard Life Insurance moved its headquarters to Greensboro and went through a period of explosive growth for the normally staid insurance industry. It then merged with Pilot Life and was eventually sold to Lincoln Financial. The vast fortunes associated with these companies and the founding families – such as the Richardsons, the Cones and the Prices – have passed through subsequent generations and, though not lost, have become diluted and are not in the hands of one person. Some of these fortunes today are divided over numerous heirs. For example, the Richardson family is reported to have over $1 billion in assets, but that wealth is spread out over more than 200 heirs and, of course, many of the heirs no longer live in Greensboro. So for our exercise of the wealthiest people in Greensboro, we tried to focus on only the wealth held by an individual or couple. If the heirs in the next generation control enough wealth, we have noted them as well. Financial wealth has various definitions. Look at the wide variations in the estimated wealth of our current president, for instance. For this list we tried to limit it to individuals or couples who control wealth of over $100 million. Our exercise is not precise. Many of these individuals do not hold their wealth in publicly traded and, therefore, verifiable securities. The list was developed after speaking to various individuals with knowledge of the wealth of their fellow Greensboro residents and more or less gaining some consensus of who controls the wealth in our community. There are people who are, through an oversight, not on the list. There are also most likely people on the list who do not belong. Some on the list may be upset that they are included because they do not want the notoriety. There will also be people who, because of our oversight are not listed that will also be upset. So in general the list is going to upset some folks. The purpose of listing the most financially successful people in our community is not to make those listed or not listed upset, it is to shed light on the men and women who create jobs and pay vast sums in local, state and federal taxes. These are also the people that give to charities, and as you will read, care enough about the community to donate to a host of causes. The following would have definitely qualified for the list but have moved their official residence out of the area. However, they continue to have a major infl uence on our community with industry and charitable giving: Mike Barry, Ray Berry, Mike Haley, Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Norman Samet, Steven Tanger and Mike Weaver. STEVEN BELL Steven Bell is the founder and chairman of Bell Partners, one of the largest real estate investment and management firms in the country. In 2016, his son Jon took over as CEO, and his son Durant is an executive vice president with the company. Bell Partners has over 60,000 homes in 16 states, 2,750 employees and nine offi ces. The company has grown considerably since Steven Bell, after STEVEN BELL a successful career as a mortgage banker and real estate broker, decided to launch Steven D. Bell & Company in 1976. He started with fewer than 20 employees, eight properties and 258 apartments. The company was renamed in 2009 and became more focused on apartments and less on commercial developments. Bell, originally from Washington, North Carolina, graduated from UNC- Chapel Hill in 1967. He joined the Raleigh office of Cameron Brown Co., a mortgage-banking subsidiary of First Union Bank, and was transferred to Greensboro. He then moved to Richardson Corp., where he worked as a real estate broker specializing in investment property. Bell has been a supporter of UNC, Greensboro College, Guilford College and the Greensboro Day School, where he served on the board of trustees.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 7 GREENSBORO’S WEALTHIEST BOB BRUGGEWORTH Bob Bruggeworth is president and CEO of Qorvo, the company that was formed when Greensboro based RF Micro Devices (RFMD) – an electronics parts manufacturer that got its start in Greensboro – merged with Oregonbased TriQuint Semiconductor in 2015. RF Micro Devices’ largest customer was Samsung, the world’s largest manufacturer of cell phones, and TriQuint’s largest customer was Apple, so from that aspect the merger made a lot of sense. Also, the two companies made complimentary products rather than competing products and the BOB BRUGGEWORTH merger was projected to save about $150 million in costs. Bruggeworth had been president and CEO of RFMD for nearly 12 years when the two companies merged, and he was selected to lead Qorvo. Bruggeworth graduated from Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, with a degree in electrical engineering. While he was in school he did an internship with AMP Inc., which turned into a job once he had his degree. He was with AMP from 1983 to 1999, rapidly moving up the corporate ladder. When he left AMP in 1999, he was president of the global computer and consumer electronics division based in Hong Kong. You can’t move much further for a job than from Hong Kong to Greensboro, in more ways than just geography. Bruggeworth has served on the board of trustees of Wilkes University and Guilford Technical Community College. He has also served on the board of LightPath Technologies. When RFMD and TriQuint merged, there was uncertainty about where the new corporate headquarters would be. The corporate headquarters for Qorvo is in Greensboro. WILLIE BULLOCK WILLIE BULLOCK Willie Bullock is the executive vice president of Greensboro-based Environmental Air Systems Inc. (EAS) – a company his father founded in 1953. Willie’s brother, James Bullock, heads up the business, which began as a heating, air-conditioning (HVAC) and plumbing company and is now well known for its custom-built HVAC equipment. In January 2016, Comfort Systems USA, a nationwide “workplace comfort” company, announced it was completing an acquisition of EAS that began in 2011. EAS was Comfort System’s most profitable subsidiary in 2015. Bullock graduated from North Carolina State University in 1974 with a bachelor of science degree in engineering operations before joining the family business. NC State, like many other institutions and charities, has been a beneficiary of the generosity of Bullock and his wife, Lisa, over the years. They have been sponsors of the Greensboro Oyster Roast and have donated to the Gateway Gardens, the United Way of Greater Greensboro, Family Service of the Piedmont, ArtsGreensboro, Center City Park and the Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts – as well as many other community causes. Bullock has served as a trustee for Greensboro College and, from 2009 to 2012, he was director of the Greensboro College Foundation. Bullock has also served on the Sedgefield Country Club board. EAS continues to make news and expand. In 2015, the company announced the addition of 60 jobs to its High Point facility, a plant it built to meet growing customer demand. The company now has a duct and pipe fabrication facility in Greensboro, the off-site construction manufacturing plant and structural steel fabrication plant in High Point and a branch office in Raleigh. EAS clients include pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, educational facilities and “mission critical” data clients. In 2016, Bullock was presented with the “Golden Award” on behalf of EAS for “cost reduction by applying the module method for pipe rack,” which could conceivably be confusing to those outside of the industry. RHINO TIMES BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY For information to advertise in our Directory call (336) 763-4170

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    8 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com GREENSBORO’S WEALTHIEST ROY CARROLL In 1984, Roy Carroll made one of those life-changing decisions, he left college to start building houses with his father. When he returned to college years later, it was to be on the board of trustees at Greensboro College, not to take classes. Carroll currently has over $2.2 billion in real estate assets that he owns or has under development, including over 15,000 apartments throughout the Southeast and as far west as Texas. Although apartments make up the bulk of Carroll’s real estate portfolio, he has been branching out and is currently constructing two hotels – a Hyatt Place as part of the $70 million Carroll at Bellemeade project in downtown Greensboro, which includes 300 apartments, and a Westin Hotel ROY CARROLL as part of The Avenue in Wilmington, another mixed-use development. Carroll has also expanded into the high-end self-storage business in a big way with Bee Safe Storage. Currently there are four Bee Safes open and 30 in some stage of development. Carroll is a native of Greensboro and has taken on several special projects in his hometown. The most well known was buying and repurposing the old Wachovia building on North Elm Street, which had been empty for 15 years, into Center Pointe, a mixed-use condominium building across from Center City Park. Carroll has traditionally built and then managed apartment developments, but in 2016 he bought apartment communities in Greensboro and High Point. Carroll also got into the newspaper publishing business with Snap Publications, which owns the Rhino Times, and he made a public offer to buy the News & Record from Warren Buffett. As part of their commitment to downtown Greensboro, Roy and his wife, Vanessa, donated $1 million for the Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts. They also contribute to Greensboro College, UNC-Greensboro – where Vanessa is on the board of trustees – and Wake Forest University. The Carrolls contribute to Samaritan’s Purse and are major donors to the JDRF diabetes foundation. In addition, Roy Carroll created the Building an End to Diabetes program, which resulted in over $600,000 being contributed to JDRF. ALAN CONE Perhaps, more than any other name in Greensboro, the name “Cone” is synonymous with success, wealth and philanthropy – and Alan Cone has certainly carried on those family traditions. The Cone family built its first denim manufacturing plant in Greensboro in 1895 – Proximity Cotton Mills – along with the company’s headquarters, and, ever since Ceasar and Moses Cone famously opened shop here, the family, its business and its charitable contributions have had a wide-ranging effect on Greensboro and Guilford County. After attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and serving in the Navy, Alan Cone ALAN CONE began working for Cone Mills. Later, however, he struck out on his own. He purchased and took the reigns of Blue Gem – a denim company that was begun in the Depression by former Blue Bell employees. Cone owned that company until the mid- ’90s. Alan and his wife, Sally, have been generous toward Greensboro’s charities and causes over the years. Their contributions are too widespread to list. However, one incident in particular helps illustrate the couple’s dedication to the community. The Cone’s housekeeper, Ruby Jones, became a big advocate and fundraiser for Triad Health Project’s annual Winter Walk for AIDS after a friend of hers contracted the disease. Jones died in a car accident in 2002, which greatly saddened the Cones. Knowing Jones’ affinity for that cause and her dedicated efforts for it, Alan and Sally took over those fundraising efforts after Jones’ death. Alan Cone has served on the board for Moses Cone Hospital and has been active in the Boy Scouts of America program. He and Sally are recipients of the Brotherhood/ Sisterhood Citation Award from the National Conference for Community and Justice. The two are frequent contributors to ArtsGreensboro and Urban Ministry and have given money to the Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 9 GREENSBORO’S WEALTHIEST DAVID COUCH David Couch is the CEO of Blue Ridge Companies based in High Point, which has developed over $600 million worth of projects and built over $800 million in residential units. But Couch’s career could have taken a very different turn. After playing baseball for Asheboro High School, Couch was drafted in 1980 by the Oakland A’s. However, instead of going to Oakland to play baseball, Couch chose to go to Winston-Salem where he played baseball and football for Wake Forest University. Couch has long been an active supporter of Wake Forest athletics and recently donated $4 million to the university – about $3 million of which was used to renovate the old Ernie Shore Field, and it was renamed the David F. Couch Ballpark. Along with staying busy in the real estate development business, Couch DAVID COUCH has also turned what he bought as land for hunting into a farm-to-table business. Summerfield Farms is a growing concern that currently is best known for its grass-fed beef, freerange chickens and eggs. But Summerfield Farms will have to go a long way to become as famous as Couch’s ranch in Montana. Camp Warren Oates is about 500 acres of land that Couch bought from actor Dennis Quaid; but much of it was previously owned by Warren Oates and his neighbor Sam Peckinpah. Couch has developed and owns property all over the Southeast, including Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi. Before founding Blue Ridge Companies, Couch got his start in real estate as the co-owner of Easter & Eisenman, a commercial real estate firm in High Point. He built his first apartments with former St. Louis and Phoenix Cardinals football player and former Guilford County Commissioner Joe Bostic. Couch started out building apartments with Blue Ridge General Contractors but then started managing the developments he built with Blue Ridge Property Management and added Blue Ridge Development Services to the Blue Ridge Companies portfolio. Couch has served on the Guilford County Planning and Development Committee, and he found time to coach baseball at Westchester Country Day School. Along with being a major donor to Wake athletics, Couch serves on the Deacon Club board of directors, Wake Will Athletic Campaign Committee, the Football Executive Committee and the Baseball Steering Committee. By the way, Couch batted .246 his senior year at Wake.

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    10 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, May 11, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com GREENSBORO’S WEALTHIEST LOUIS DEJOY When the Rhino Times did an article on the most expensive homes in Greensboro last year, the house that came in at number one in value was the one owned by Louis DeJoy and his wife, Aldona Wos, at 806 Country Club Dr. (though it’s more visible from Nottingham Road). That house is often the site of charity events and political fundraisers and it’s not unusual to see catering vans or even Secret Service agents outside the DeJoy’s home on a weekend evening. DeJoy made a name for himself when it came to transforming the trucking company his father, Dominick DeJoy Sr., started in 1968 – New Breed. Louis began his career as a CPA. However, when the trucking company was struggling, he stepped in. Over the years, New Breed went from a small trucking company to a giant LOUIS DEJOY warehousing, supply chain and logistics business. The company moved from New York to High Point and was able to secure huge contracts with companies like Verizon and Boeing. Louis was CEO from 1983 to 2014, when New Breed was purchased by XPO Logistics for $615 million. DeJoy later started a new real estate and private equity company, LDJ Global Strategies. Though he’s still active in politics and charitable causes, he told the Triad Business Journal that he subscribed to The Wall Street Journal for three decades but it was only after selling the business that he actually got a chance to read it. In 2012, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory appointed DeJoy’s wife as secretary of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. Wos, a physician, had earlier served as the United States ambassador to Estonia. Much of the couple’s charitable work is done through the Louis DeJoy and Aldona Z. Wos Family Foundation, which has been a sponsor of a Wyndham Championship pro-am in recent years. The two have been major contributors to United Way of Greater Greensboro, United Way of Greater High Point, the JDRF diabetes foundation, Hospice and Palliative Care of Greensboro, Triad Stage, the Greensboro Ballet and the fight against multiple sclerosis. The couple has also contributed heavily to St. Pius X Catholic Church. Last September, St. Pius X Catholic School dedicated a new $3.6 million building as the DeJoy Primary Education Center in honor of that generosity. ARTHUR DICK People in Greensboro with radios – and many others within the broadcast range of the city – know the Dick family name through Dick Broadcasting, a started in 1953 in Knoxville, Tennessee, by James Dick Sr. – the father of Allen and Arthur Dick. Allen is the president and CEO, while Arthur worked in the family’s radio business before starting a cleaning business of his own. Over the years, Dick Broadcasting grew into a major radio presence in the Southeast, and, in 2000, Arthur and Allen Dick sold 12 of 14 radio stations owned by Dick Broadcasting for $300 million. However, they hung on to two popular stations that broadcast from Lewis Street in downtown Greensboro. The stations sold were in Alabama ARTHUR AND ALLEN DICK and Tennessee, and, at that time, the employees of Greensboro’s WKRR-FM – better known as Rock 92 – and 107.5 WKZL felt certain those two stations would be sold as part of the deal, but were pleasantly surprised to discover the Dicks wanted to hold onto the two hometown stations. Rock 92 is well known for the often bawdy Two Guys Named Chris morning show and WKZL is the station where the Murphy in the Morning Show was a ratings giant for years. As radio stations have been engaged in merger mania since the ’90s, it’s more and more rare to find locally owned stations, and these have been a benefit to the community. Both stations frequently sponsor charity functions, and support area causes and events. Allen Dick once said in a newspaper interview that being local gives the stations “more freedom and flexibility,” and helped them “react to market conditions quickly.” Arthur Dick worked for Dick Broadcasting for about four years in the late ’80s before he became president of Arthur Construction Company – a position he held for two decades. Arthur is now the president and CEO of AvantaClean of the Piedmont, an environmental services business that provides mold and moisture control, air duct cleaning, water control services and related services. Arthur, along with his wife, Desiree, donate to Family Services of the Piedmont, the Greensboro Day School and the Future Fund among others.

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