Topics
Publishers
Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
Rhino Times - 2017-07-13
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-07-13 00:00:00
Page 1 of 4
  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 1

    Vol. V No. 28 Greensboro, North Carolina www.rhinotimes.com Thursday, July 13, 2017 County Kiddie Train Headed to California John Hammer And That’s How a Bill Becomes a Law plus Under The Hammer, Uncle Orson Reviews Everything AND MORE

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 2

    2 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com THE WEEKLY Hammer The Weekly Hammer And That’s How a by John Hammer It appears that Greensboro will be getting a long awaited hotel on South Elm Street, but it wouldn’t be happening if not for the work of state Rep. Jon Hardister and state Sen. Trudy Wade, in the final hours of the legislative session in June. The last days the state legislature is in session are always a little crazy, and June 29 was no different. The bill Hardister and Wade pushed through in the final minutes Bill Becomes a Law of the session is relatively simple. State building codes required a wall between the portions of a planned parking garage built over property owned by the city and over property owned by the hotel. Since it is all to be one large parking garage building, a wall through the middle wouldn’t have worked. The bill gives Greensboro an exception to this particular regulation in the statewide building code, and in the same bill is an exception for airports, so they don’t have to build storm water retention ponds. This is particularly needed by the Piedmont Triad International Airport as it expands. Both items are simple and straight forward and should not have been a problem to pass. The building code issue is a unique situation and there were no protestors rallying in favor of a wall through the middle of a parking deck. Nor was anyone demanding that airports build more ponds to attract more geese to interfere with planes taking off and landing. But those items were placed in a larger regulation reform bill, which is where a whole host of different revisions are placed, and that bill got stalled. City Attorney Tom Carruthers had been to Raleigh to explain to the committee Greensboro’s need for the exception to the state building code and the lobbyists who work for the City of Greensboro had been working on it as well, but the larger bill got stalled because of other provisions. Hardister said that on Thursday, June 29, the day the legislature was scheduled to adjourn, he and Wade realized the regulation reform bill was not going to pass and they needed a bill where they could strip out what was there and replace it with the two items for Greensboro. Hardister said they got help from the city’s lobbyists and found Senate Bill 8, which was no longer needed because the provisions in it had been placed in another bill. It sounds confusing because it is, but in the legislature there can be many different bills introduced on the same issue. In some cases, similar bills are introduced in the House and the Senate but only one is passed by both chambers, leaving the other one to die a natural death or be resurrected and given a new life, which is what Hardister and Wade did for SB8. Hardister said House Finance Chair Rep. Jason Saine had said stripping the bill was fine, but he wanted to add a provision that private schools that received state scholarship funding had to have background checks for their employees. This was reportedly (continued on page 30) City Council Health Insurance Redux by John Hammer Judging from the number of comments we have received about the column “City Council Wants Health Care for Life,” I thought I’d go into more detail about exactly what the resolution the City Council passed at the June 20 meeting asked the North Carolina General Assembly to do. The bill the City Council sent to the legislature, seeking health care benefits from the city for councilmembers, wasn’t passed by the General Assembly, so the issue is on hold, at least for a while. But it will no doubt be something the Greensboro City Council will be pushing for next year, so it’s worth considering. When he introduced the idea at the City Council meeting, Councilmember Mike Barber said that there would be no expense to the city if the proposed bill passed the legislature, but that is not what City Manager Jim Westmoreland said at the meeting, and not what the resolution passed by the City Council states. Barber also said that the passage of the proposed bill would put the City Council on equal footing with the Guilford County commissioners, who, after serving 10 years, are eligible to receive health care paid for by the county when they leave office. The county can choose to pay all or part of that health insurance premium, but so far it has chosen to pay all. The resolution passed by the City Council is far more specific in awarding benefits to former city councilmembers The resolution states that after two terms on the City Council, a former city councilmember would be eligible for the same healthcare benefits as an employee retiring with less than 20 years of service. What this means is that the former city councilmember would be eligible to buy health insurance through the city system but the city wouldn’t pay any portion of the premium. This is what Barber said the City Council was doing for all councilmembers, but that isn’t what the resolution states. It gets a bit confusing because the City Council serves two-year terms, but the City Council election in November will be for four-years terms. The resolution only states “terms,” not years, like the statute for county commissioners. City Attorney Tom Carruthers said the proposal would only apply to city councilmembers leaving the council in the future. So presumably a councilmember’s previous two-year term counts as a term when they leave the City Council. County commissioners, who serve four-year terms, are only eligible after serving 10 years, so they have to be elected three times, instead of two like the City Council. Also, according to the resolution, after serving three terms on the City Council, the city would pay 50 percent of the cost of the health insurance; after four terms the city would pay 75 percent of the cost; and after five terms the city would pay 100 percent of the cost of the former city councilmember’s health insurance until they qualified for Medicare, and then the city would pay the cost of supplemental insurance. So if this passes the state legislature, Councilmember Yvonne Johnson, who has served 11 terms on the City Council and is running for her 12th, would certainly qualify. Mayor Nancy Vaughan would also qualify, having already served six terms on the City Council and running (continued on page 26)

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 3

    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 3 table of CONTENTS 2 WEEKLY HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 6 COUNTY KIDDIE TRAIN LEAVES NORTHEAST PARK ON ROUND TRIP TO CALIFORNIA BY SCOTT D. YOST 8 HARDISTER AND WADE ADDRESS FOWL ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE AT PTIA BY SCOTT D. YOST 10 CHANCE TO REPLACE JAMAL FOX IN DISTRICT 2 CITY COUNCIL SEAT ATTRACTS FIVE BY JOHN HAMMER 11 FIRST WEEK OF ELECTION FILING INDICATES COUNCIL MAY MOVE LEFT BY JOHN HAMMER 14 COMMISSIONERS TO SAY BOTTOMS UP TO SUNDAY BRUNCH BILL BY SCOTT D. YOST EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John Hammer managing editor ELAINE HAMMER county editor SCOTT D. YOST contributing editor ORSON SCOTT CARD 15 UNCLE ORSON BY ORSON SCOTT CARD 23 YOST COLUMN BY SCOTT D. YOST 35 UNDER THE HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 4 RHINO SHORTS 9 RHINOS AROUND WORLD 10, 31 PUZZLE ANSWERS 17 REAL ESTATE 18 NYT CROSSWORD 19 SUDOKU 19 CHILDREN’S SCHEDULE 21 SOUND OF THE BEEP 28 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 30 Cover: Greensboro City Swim Meet at the Greensboro Aquatic Center. Photo by Sandy Groover. More photos pages 12 and 13 PUBLISHER Roy Carroll GENERAL MANAGER Joann Zollo creative director ANTHONY COUNCIL advertising consultants DONNA GOODWIN 216 West Market Street, Greensboro NC 27401 P.O. Box 9023, Greensboro NC 27429 | (336) 763-4170 (336) 763-2585 fax | sales@rhinotimes.com | www.rhinotimes.com Peripheral Neuropathy WARNING! Greensboro, NC – The most common method your doctor will recommend to treat your neuropathy is with prescription drugs that may temporarily reduce your symptoms. These drugs have names such as Gabapentin, Lyrica, Cymbalta, and Neurontin, and are primarily antidepressant or anti-seizure drugs. These drugs may cause you to feel uncomfortable and have a variety of harmful side effects. Figure 1: Notice the very small blood vessels surrounding each nerve. Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems. This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which causes the nerves to begin to degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow. As you can see in Figure 2, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not get the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms. Figure 2: When these very small blood vessels become diseased they begin to shrivel up and the nerves begin to degenerate. The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here that offers you hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. In order to effectively treat your neuropathy three factors must be determined. 1) What is the underlying cause? 2) How Much Nerve Damage Has Been Sustained. NOTE: Once you have sustained 85% nerve loss, there is likely nothing that we can do for you. 3) How much treatment will your condition require? The treatment that is provided at Advance Wellness has three main goals: 1) Increase blood flow 2) Stimulate small fiber nerves 3) Decrease brain-based pain The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes a specialized low level light therapy using light emitting diode technology. This technology was originally developed by NASA to assist in increasing blood flow. The low level light therapy is like watering a plant. The light therapy will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a plant and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper. Figure 3: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered. To learn more, attend the Peripheral Neuropathy Workshop. Details below. Have You Been Told You Have To “LIVE WITH THE PAIN?” Neuropathy Workshop Sat., July 29 th 9:30 a.m. 515 College Road #11 Greensboro, NC 27410 FREE!! Refreshments provided. Call: (336) 316-0827 Call NOW! Seating is limited. Dr. Joe Draper, III, DC Advance Wellness is located near Guilford College.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 4

    4 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com RHINO SHORTS by John Hammer Here’s an idea that won’t cost the city a dime, but would be helpful to its citizens. First, list the Greensboro City Council meetings on the city meetings calendar on the city web page. The City Council meetings may not seem as important to staff as the TaiRoGa workout class, but a lot of people like to know when the governing body for the city meets. Second, in some easy to fi nd location place a readable and printable list of what residents can put in their recycling containers. It appears that even the city is a little unsure on this, so it might force the city to fi nd out exactly what is and isn’t recyclable and then they could tell the rest of us. One of the most frightening maps imaginable for the future of our country can be found in the July 7 edition of the Triad Business Journal. It lists the wealthiest communities in the US and far and away the wealthiest place in the country is Washington, DC. Of course, Washington, DC, isn’t listed but out of the top 25 wealthiest communities eight are in the DC area. Chevy Chase, Maryland, is than industry. Disastrous because the wealthiest; Chevy Chase Village, Maryland, is number 15; next door the government doesn’t create any wealth, it takes money from the people Somerset, Maryland, is 12; and and redistributes it. In this case they Chevy Chase (CDP) is number 20. In Virginia, Wolf Trap is number 4, Great Falls is number 10 and McLean is number 19, while Potomac, Maryland, are taking billions out of the pockets of everyday hardworking Americans and giving it to the extremely wealthy who work for the government. is number 24. There is only one industry in DC and that is the US government. Nearly We learn a lot in News & Record every job is related to the government Editorial Page Editor Allen Johnson’s directly or indirectly. It is disastrous column in the Sunday paper. First, economic news that the government we learn that Johnson is a demanding is creating far more wealthly people (continued on page 7) Photos by John Hammer The talk in our little part of the downtown has been “what is that on the top of the office building at the corner of West Market and John Wesley Way?” Nobody seemed to know, so I stopped in and found out that, while the downstairs will remain a legal office, the upstairs is being transformed into an apartment by Christian Wilson and his wife, Jodee Ruppel, who happens to be vice president of Downtown Greensboro Inc. So that seems appropriate. What they are building on the roof is a large room with windows on three sides and decks off the front and the back. The view is great. BASEMENT WATERPROOFING CRAWL SPACE REPAIR CONTACT US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE FOUNDATION REPAIR 877-222-6502 BasementNeighbors.com WE LIFT CONCRETE! - DON’T REPLACE IT RAISE IT!

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 5

    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 5

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 6

    6 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com County Kiddie Train Leaves Northeast Park on Round Trip to California by Scott D. Yost They say there’s no such thing as a free lunch but apparently there are free kiddie train repairs. In an amazing and unexplainable turn of events in the long-running saga of the dysfunctional Little Train that Couldn’t at Northeast Park, the company that sold the defective train to Guilford County has, out of the blue, agreed to come get the train, truck it back to California, repair it and return it free of charge. That comes two months after the Guilford County Board of Commissioners voted to spend an estimated $63,000 to fix the train and tracks. The board later hired a Burlington company to do the repairs. This new development means the county could save nearly all of that money commissioners approved earlier this year in their last ditch effort to save the train. County officials had long ago given up hopes that the original supplier that sold the train to the county would fix it. Six years ago, Guilford County purchased the C.P. Huntington train from Katiland Trains to serve as a park attraction that would draw kids and their families to Northeast Park, but the train has never run properly and, aside from a short stint a year and a half ago, the ride has never been operational. The county spent nearly $370,000 to purchase the train and tracks – roughly $170,000 for the train, and about $200,000 for the tracks. Now, with attempted repairs, Guilford County has spent about a half million dollars in all on the project. At a Board of Commissioner’s meeting in early April, the board voted 7 to 1 to spend the $63,000 to save the choo-choo that’s been the source of major headaches for more than five years. Fixing the track was estimated to cost about $16,000, while the engine repairs were projected to cost around $47,000. The county had chosen Diesel Engine and Heavy Equipment Repair of Burlington to repair the train. One county official said this week that, at some point Diesel Engine contacted Katiland – which now operates under the name Western Train Co. – and the California-based company offered to come get the train, repair it at no charge and return it to Guilford County in running condition within 90 days. That decision by Western Train has many Guilford County officials scratching their heads, since the county has had an ongoing dispute with the company over the train for years, and, two years ago, Guilford County even had trouble getting an operator’s manual from Katiland that was required for the train to pass a state inspection. Guilford County Commissioner Alan Branson represents much of northeastern Guilford County, where the kiddie train has sat idle for years. Branson said the latest development sounds suspiciously too good to be true, but he added that, at this point, just about anything is worth a shot when it comes to the train. “I hope they will do a total rebuild and it will last forever,” Branson said, adding that, given the history of contention between the county and Katiland, it’s a real puzzle why the company is now offering to repair the train. Chairman of the Guilford County Board of Commissioners Jeff Phillips said that, though he’s still getting up to speed on the situation, if what he’s hearing turns out to be true, it’s good to see the company “stepping up and doing what it should have all along.” “If that’s the case, then I’m all for it,” Phillips said. One county official joked that he hopes this isn’t an elaborate attempt by the company to steal the train back from the county. Phillips didn’t go that far in his skepticism, but he did say, regarding county staff’s decision to accept the offer, “I hope we’re vetting this.” Commissioner Hank Henning said he has one theory why the train maker may now be willing to make the repairs. “I suggested at a public meeting that maybe we should sue them,” Henning said. “Maybe that had something to do with it.” Henning also said the ongoing bad publicity from Guilford County’s train debacle may have played a role in the company’s decision. Henning, like most of the other commissioners, was reluctant earlier this year to spend the $63,000 to try once again to repair the train and, at that April meeting, Henning exclaimed, “What is our breaking point? When do we say, ‘Enough is enough’? For me, this is it. If it’s even $10,000 brought to us next year – then I’m probably done.” At that same meeting, Guilford County Facilities, Parks and Property Management Director Robert McNiece said he would never bring the train before the commissioners again because, he said, rather than do that he would get under the train and repair it himself. Even if Guilford County gets the train back, the county will still end up paying some of the money for track repair. However, about $47,000 of the money the board allocated may be saved. Despite all the aggravation the kiddie train has brought county officials over the years, Guilford County commissioners and county park staff would like to see the ride at the park in operation on a regular basis. Though the attraction has been closed for nearly its entire existence, Northeast Park staff say that people often call and ask when the train will be running; and, recently, when the Rhino Times ran a humor piece that included a joke ad announcing the train’s grand opening, the newspaper got inquires to that effect as well. It was a very popular ride during the train’s brief life when it was up and running in December 2015. When Northeast Park held a Festival of Lights celebration at that time, many kids rode the train and it, along with the Christmas lights, was the central attraction that night.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 7

    RHINOSHORTS (continued from page 4) www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 7 restaurant customer. According to his column he is the kind of person who goes to a restaurant just before closing, complains about the water, about being checked on too many times during the meal, the staff getting ready to close and not having someone to come pick up his check as soon as puts it down. From all this complaining he gets two free meals and a free desert and then complains that he was discriminated against because he is black. Those who are so in favor of using electricity from solar and wind production might want to take a look at the recent power outage in South Australia that blacked out an entire state. Because tornados took down some power lines, a large number of windmills shut down at once. About half of the electrical production for South Australia comes from wind, and wind generators cannot be cranked up like gas, oil or coal to produce more power, so there was no way to increase the production to make up for the loss and the entire system went down. With fossil fuel generating facilities, if one facility has to reduce power, the others are increased to make up the difference; but with wind power that isn’t possible. Investigators said the reason this had not happened previously was because more of the electricity was produced by oil, gas and coal. hit call but it doesn’t come and you immediately start complaining about the horrible officiating and have the influence to get that official fired, which you do based on this one body-worn camera video that you watch over and over. But what you can’t see is that the player who slammed into the quarterback late only did so because he was hit by an offensive player who knocked him into the quarterback, in other words it wasn’t his fault and the referee made the right call. But since you don’t have access to a view of the whole game, but only this one bodyworn camera video, you are secure in your belief that you are right. I was reading about some economic incentives controversy, which brought to mind one of the main reasons for economic incentives – and it isn’t to attract industry. There are many reasons to give economic incentives but one reason they have become so popular is because it gives elected officials the opportunity to claim credit for attracting industry and jobs. Here’s a way to look at police body-worn camera footage. Imagine watching a football game from the body worn camera of any one player. Would you even know who won the game? So your only view of the game is from this one body-worn camera video and on one play when your camera wearer is clearly on the ground, you see the quarterback throw the ball and then get slammed late by a defensive player. So you’re hollering for a late Photo by John Hammer Friday, July 7, Greensboro attorney Nicholas Ackerman wore his birthday suit to court. It’s not what you may think of when you hear “birthday suit,” but it’s still shocking.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 8

    8 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Hardister and Wade Address Fowl Attractive Nuisance at PTIA by Scott D. Yost “It’s dangerous for the airplanes and it’s dangerous for the birds too,” North Carolina Rep. Jon Hardister said of water retention ponds near airports. And, thanks to brand new state legislation that Hardister and State Sen. Trudy Wade helped push through in the fi nal hours of state budget negotiations, Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA) and other airports in the state won’t have to worry about that hazard. The new law is a big help to PTIA, especially where there’s major development underway – including a new taxiway bridge across I-73 that will allow runway access to a roughly 800-acre aviation megasite just across the interstate from the airport. These days, PTIA is laying down a lot of concrete, and usually projects of this sort require the construction of corresponding retention ponds to manage storm water runoff. That’s a fi ne plan for most projects – it helps protect the water supply – however, retention ponds near airports are a big problem since they attract geese and other fowl, which notoriously don’t mix well with aircraft. The new law pushed through by Hardister and Wade provides some relief from those watershed regulations, and PTIA Executive Director Kevin Baker said this week that this change will help cut the red tape as the airport moves forward with its new projects. Since 2012, airports outside of watershed critical areas have had some exemptions from the retention pond requirements of the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCEQ), but airports haven’t necessarily been exempted from storm water controls in local water supply watersheds until now. In June, PTIA airport announced that the long awaited taxiway bridge across I-73 was complete and the airport is now ready to build the taxiway on the bridge as its next major undertaking. Baker said of the new legislation, “It clarifies the storm water design requirements for airfi eld projects at our airport and clears the way for us to begin the design and construction of a very important taxiway on the western side of the airport that will provide access to economic development sites.” He added, “With all the projects we have underway, this certainly would have been an issue.” Baker said that, as one can imagine, PTIA – which is surrounded in large part by natural areas – already has enough problems with animals of all types and it doesn’t need any additional issues from fl ocks of birds being drawn to inviting retention ponds. According to Baker, PTIA contracts with the Wildlife Services branch of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to manage the threats of everything from birds potentially disrupting air traffi c to deer on the runways that pilots may have to dodge on landing or takeoff. “We have on ongoing contract with the USDA to control not only geese and birds, but also deer and any other wildlife that interfere with operations,” Baker said. Baker added that the USDA currently uses interesting methods of various sorts to let the animals know they are by no means welcome on or near airport grounds – or in the airspace above PTIA. “One of the fi rst things they do is harassment,” Baker said of the federal wildlife workers. He said that, for instance, they use a loud noisemaker that explodes blank ammo to mimic the sound of a shotgun – a sound that understandably makes geese and other birds uneasy. Nationally and internationally, there have been a number of incidents over the years with birds being sucked into aircraft engines or slamming into propellers – in some cases leading to crashes or emergency landings. In January 2009, in the Miracle on the Hudson incident, an Airbus A320 struck a fl ock of geese north of the George Washington Bridge in New York and that caused an engine failure that forced Capt. Sully Sullenberger to land the plane on the Hudson River. Area authorities want to control the geese and other fowl around PTIA so planes aren’t forced to attempt anything similar on Buffalo Creek. Wade said she was happy to spearhead, in the state Senate, what she called a “commonsense” change, and she commended Hardister for his work in the House with regard to the legislation. Hardister said the previous watershed regulations would have had a negative impact on projects now planned at PTIA. He said this type of legislation often goes unnoticed but it’s important for things like passenger safety and economic development. Hardister said this legislation was added to a related bill late at night as lawmakers were wrapping up their recent session. “Trudy Wade and I had to do our best to get this resolved and it was literally done at the 11th hour,” he said. Hardister said things wrapped up about 1:30 a.m. in a late-night lawmaking session when the changes were fi nally adopted. The NCEQ has signed off on the changes in the new legislation. Baker said that, when it comes to environmental concerns, runways are in less need of water retention ponds than other projects are. “They have huge, big, fl at expansions of grass on the sides, and water runs off and has a chance to be absorbed back into the ground,” Baker said. Guilford County Chief Plans Engineer Frank Parks said that water retention ponds are just one strategy for addressing storm water issues for developments. “Any time you build a building and parking lot with concrete where you are developing more than 24 percent of the total area, storm water control devices are put in,” Parks said. He said that’s done largely to protect the drinking water. Some of the water from the airport area, for instance, ends up in Lake Higgins. He said his department checks retention ponds regularly to make sure proper water levels are maintained and see that the ponds are serving the intended purpose. Though county inspectors handle compliance issues in unincorporated Guilford County and in some of the county’s towns, state inspectors check the airport for compliance. Parks said that exceptions to the state regulations are rare, though he added that some sites were grandfathered in before the current legislation that applies to county construction came about. The State of North Carolina, in its information on storm water issues, lists several types of control devices to help address storm water runoff, erosion and pollution issues created by land development. Those include fi ltration basins, dry detention basins and swales – a shallow channel with dense vegetation around that helps purify and redirect storm water. In one example of an alternative method, there’s a large water retention holding tank under the Greensboro Coliseum’s parking lot. As the projects at the air port are designed and implemented, it will be determined what types of storm water mitigation strategies are used there.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 9

    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 9 Reva Ingram Fortune celebrated her 100th birthday in April with Alan Marshall (kneeling) Ed Turner and Julee Fortune Marshall at Muir’s Chapel Methodist Church. Although they forgot their Rhino Times, we figure you only turn a hundred once and made an exception. Richard Sumner in North Myrtle Beach Send your Rhinos Around the World to letters@rhinotimes.com, and don’t forget your paper.

  • Add to bookmarks Add to subscriptions Share
    Page 10

    10 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, July 13, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Opportunity to Replace Jamal Fox in District 2 City Council Seat Attracts Five by John Hammer Five people filed before the deadline on Monday, July 10 to fill the District 2 seat on the City Council, which will be appointed by the City Council at its Tuesday, July 18 meeting to replace City Councilmember Jamal Fox, who announced in June he would be resigning. Fox is getting married next month and is reportedly moving to Portland, Oregon, where his soon-to-be wife lives. Those who have filed to be appointed to the District 2 council seat to serve until the current term ends in December are C.J. Brinson, Tim Vincent, Mebane Ham, Goldie Wells and Sherry Walker. Vincent and Brinson have both also filed to run for election to the District 2 seat in November, along with Felicia Angus, who did not apply for the appointment. Former District 2 City Councilmember Jim Kee has announced his intention to run for the District 2 seat, but Kee also did not apply for the appointment to the City Council. By far the best known of the five is Wells, who served as the District 2 councilmember from 2005 to 2009. Wells stepped down in 2009 and Kee was elected to represent District 2. Kee was defeated by Fox in 2013 and Fox won reelection in 2015. Fox has been an active and popular councilmember and, until he announced he was resigning, it appeared he had a good chance of being reelected. Since stepping down from the council in 2009, Wells has remained active in the community and is currently chair of the Citizens for Economic and Environmental Justice and the Interactive Resource Center. She is co-chair of the North Carolina Freedom Monument Park and a member of the Building Stronger Neighborhoods Grants Review Committee, Preservation North Carolina and the Greensboro Bias Based Police Committee as well as other committees. She is a member of the board of trustees of Wells Memorial Church of God in Christ and many other church related organizations. Wells is a retired educator who has degrees from Hampton University and North Carolina A&T State University and a doctorate from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Vincent is a lifelong resident of Greensboro who graduated from Dudley High School and Guilford College. He is currently the chief operations officer of Ready 4 Change, a business development associate with Vantage Consulting Associates and a program director with the Non- Profit Development Institute. Earlier in his career he sold cars and was a finance manager at Green Ford. Vincent has served as the chairman of the Greensboro Minimum Standard Housing Commission, an advisor to the NC Legacy Foundation and participated in the Greensboro City Academy. Brinson was one of seven members of Operation Transparency who were arrested and charged with trespassing at city hall in January after demanding the records of the investigation of the arrest of Dejuan Yourse. Brinson is currently a youth pastor at Faith Community Church and a volunteer coordinator with Greensboro Participatory Budgeting. He has served as a youth organizer for the Beloved Community Center and and an organizing assistant with Democracy North Carolina. He has also worked as a testing coordinator and substitute teacher for Guilford County Schools. Brinson is a graduate of NC A&T State University and Hood Theological Seminary. Since 1990, Ham has run Hambone and Associates, a public relations and marketing firm. Her clients have included ArtQuest, Greensboro Beautiful, Greensboro Bicentennial Celebration, and the Mental Health Association in Greensboro. Ham has been a member of numerous civic boards and associations and is a past board president of the the Women’s Resource Center, a past president of the Women’s Professional Forum and has participated in Leadership Greensboro. She is a graduate of Page High School and UNC Chapel Hill and has lived in District 2 for over 25 years. Walker sent a short email to the city clerk’s office and included no letter or resume, but she evidently wants to be appointed to the City Council. She is a registered Democrat in District 2 and according to Guilford County Board of Elections records she has never voted in Guilford County. If either Vincent or Brinson is appointed, it will give them an advantage in the City Council election, since they will be an incumbent. Both District 5 Councilmember Tony Wilkins and District 3 Councilmember Justin Outling were first appointed to their positions before being elected to serve full terms. Crossword Solution From last week’s issue S P E N T M I C A N A R C O V A T E P O L A R A C L U O V E R N I G E L R I F L E R O O T P O N E S L U N K A S I A N L O N G H O R N E D BE ET L E Y E N C E O S O S O I L S A C H A N T R A B B I T T N O R A F O U R CO RN E R S KA LE I D O S C O P I C A T S E A D E L L M O O R A V A S T S H E A T H K Y O T O B A L K S T E R M A S K F O R T B A L L S R S N A T I O N A L A R CH IV ES P C S E S S E X D O N A T E C A R E D E T O X L E A N N S T O N E D I N E P T A A R E M I D I O R A T E S Y M P TO MA TO L O G Y C O S M OK RA M E R C A P O U N C T I O N N O O I L N A V E S K I S P O T T S A V E G E T A B L E S H O R T E N I N G A M O N G I L Y A S A K E A I D A N G O T T I M E E T A M E N S C A R E O B E S E E S S E N U D E Y E L L S

Page 1 of 4

Please wait