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Rhino Times - 2017-09-07
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-09-07 00:00:00
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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 11 state (continued from previous page) when her father asked her to create a new cosmetics line for the company. “It is the best feeling to carry a legacy on,” she said. She also offered some business advice. “There are good times and bad times and, no matter what, you keep going,” she said. She said her family often read Napoleon Hill’s book Think and Grow Rich and took its lessons to heart. “You have to have Plan A, Plan B, Plan C and Plan D, and when that doesn’t work you have to have Plan A1 and A2 …” She said the luncheon was a great event. “This is fabulous to have so many business owners all together in one place,” Oglesby said, and she added that people should take advantage of all that the chamber has to offer. “And finally,” she said, “as consumers, buy local.” Troy Knauss, a partner with Guardant Partners and a well known angel investor with an MBA from Wake Forest, spoke about a new online tool for entrepreneurs from InnovateGSO. “Triad Navigator,” at Triadnavigator. org, is an information and support tool, now in beta testing, for local start-ups. It will go live in November but he said people can go to the site now to help with the testing. “The Innovate Greensboro Council was formed in 2015, one of five North Carolina cities participating in InnovateNC, for intentionally engaging under-connected populations,” he said. Adam Duggins, a managing partner with New Page Capital, told the attendees how his wife became sold on living in Greensboro. “Like many Greensboro kids, I wanted bigger lights and brighter cities and I worked in cities like Atlanta and New York,” Duggins said. His wife was from Maryland and she didn’t want to move to Greensboro, he said. He said that in the past sometimes people sounded like they were ashamed of living in the city and his wife didn’t have a good impression of Greensboro at all. “One of the conversations we actually had, she said, ‘I don’t want to live in your home town,’ and I said, ‘I don’t want to live in your hometown,” Duggins said. He said that, when the couple came back five years ago, his brother showed them around and pointed out all the great things happening in Greensboro. “He showed us what was going on at PTI [Piedmont Triad International Airport], and with the aviation industry that didn’t exist before,” he said. “He showed us the universities with bustling campuses and a downtown that was dramatically different.” Duggins said his brother also showed the couple the city’s new large aquatic center. “My wife is a collegiate swimmer, so she walked in there and she turned to me and said, ‘This is the best swimming facility on the East Coast.’ She saw that a community that could do something like that, could be bold.” “Driving back to Atlanta, she said, ‘Hey, what about Greensboro?’” Duggins said. He said it can be hard to see while it is happening but, with all that’s going on downtown, at the airport and at area universities, “Greensboro right now is going through a renaissance.” But not enough people are talking about it, he said. “Two of the best qualities of the folks here in Greensboro are that we work hard and we’re humble,” he said at the close of his speech. “We’ve got to continue to work hard but we might want to be a little less humble about it.” Derrick Ellington, the Triad Market President of Bank of America, spoke at the luncheon on the way in which “Greensboro has become a city of action that is making great strides.” Ellington said the Chamber of Commerce has a five-year plan to make Greensboro a household name. “No longer will we get confused with Greenville, South Carolina,” he told the crowd. “We will turn the tide and we will become once and for all a force to be reckoned with regionally and globally.” Ellington said that will be done in part by preparing sites for business and leveraging the growth the city has already experienced. At the end of the luncheon, the chamber showed a video of peoplein-the-street interviews where men, women and children talked about why they liked living in Greensboro. Two of the crowd favorites were the man who had a one-word answer, “Golf!” and the one who said he liked city because there were a lot of bars. Also at the State of Our Community luncheon, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation and the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro presented the Hubert B. Humphrey Jr. School Improvement Fund Award to Eastern Guilford High School Principal Lance Sockwell for his accomplishments with that school.

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    12 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Deeds Office Has Your Passport To Fast Service by Scott D. Yost On Tuesday, Sept. 5, the Guilford County Register of Deeds office opened the only no-appointment “walkin” passport application office in the county, which means citizens can show up unannounced and get instant passport service. Guilford County Register of Deeds Jeff Thigpen said he’s very excited about the new service, which he said should dramatically cut down wait times for passport seekers, make things easier on customers and generate new revenue for Guilford County government. “We want to make this process as convenient as possible and become the premier location for passports in Guilford County,” Thigpen said. The service, available from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday, is being provided at the county’s main deeds office in the BB&T building at 201 W. Market St. in downtown Greensboro. With Guilford County Passport Services now the only walkin facility in the county with the ability to process passport applications for the US Department of State, Thigpen said he’s betting his office will draw a lot of customers who are planning to travel out of the country or to live or work outside the US. “Right now, to set up an appointment through another provider, it can mean you wait a couple of weeks to four weeks,” Thigpen said, adding that the other choice is driving to another county where they take walk-ins. “A lot of people are going to choose DENTAL Insurance Physicians Mutual Insurance Company A less expensive way to help get the dental care you deserve If you’re over 50, you can get coverage for about $1 a day* Keep your own dentist! NO networks to worry about No wait for preventive care and no deductibles – you could get a checkup tomorrow Coverage for over 350 procedures – including cleanings, exams, fillings, crowns…even dentures NO annual or lifetime cap on the cash benefits you can receive FREE Information Kit 1-855-704-9501 www.dental50plus.com/142 *Individual plan. Product not available in MN, MT, NH, RI, VT, WA. Acceptance guaranteed for one insurance policy/certificate of this type. Contact us for complete details about this insurance solicitation. This specific offer is not available in CO, NY; call 1-800-969-4781 or respond for similar offer. Certificate C250A (ID: C250E; PA: C250Q); Insurance Policy P150 (GA: P150GA; NY: P150NY; OK: P150OK; TN: P150TN) 6096C MB16-NM001Cc not to drive to Winston-Salem or to another county,” Thigpen said. “If you want a passport and you don’t want to wait – well, the only walk-in facility is Guilford County.” He said parking can be tight at the BB&T building so his office is encouraging people to use the large parking deck on Greene Street just southeast of the deeds office. The deeds office opened the passport office in November of last year. At that time, the service was provided only by appointment – like other providers in the county offer. Since opening, Thigpen’s office has processed over 2,350 passport applications and generated about $80,000 in revenue for Guilford County government. It is not the first walk-in passport office in the state – but that’s only because another register of deeds snuck in under the wire and stole Thigpen’s thunder. “The Rockingham County Register of Deeds opened last month and declared ‘walk in,” Thigpen said. “That joker jumped out there before we announced. He visited us and we helped him get going.” Still, there doesn’t appear to be any hard feelings. “He’s a good guy and he gave me a shout out, so he gets a knuckle-bump from the Guilford Register of Deeds office,” Thigpen said. Guilford County’s deeds office charges a $25 processing fee and provides passport photos for $10 if needed. The federal government has other set costs on top of that. Thigpen said people can bring in photos but the pictures must be the right size and of quality acceptable to the US government. He said people would generally pay more than $10 for those photos at a private business that offers them. Thigpen added that, if passports are processed at his office, people also have easy access to their birth certificates, which are sometimes needed for acquiring a passport. If customers need certified birth certificates, the deeds office can provide them for $10 if the person was born in Guilford County. If the person was born outside of Guilford County, but in North Carolina after 1971, that fee is $24. Thigpen said he expects a lot of customers for the services, but he’s curious to see exactly how demand turns out. “We don’t know what we’re going to get,” Thigpen said, adding that one concern of his is that the service proves so popular it will overwhelm the current employees handling it. “We believe we will have a lot of people,” Thigpen said. Guilford County was the third Register of Deeds office to open a Passport office in North Carolina, behind Brunswick and Johnston counties. Rockingham County recently became the fourth. If people have questions about acquiring their passports, Guilford County Passport Services has a dedicated phone number, (336) 641- 5322 and email address – passports@ myguilford.com – as well as a website: www.myguilford.com/rod/passports. Since being elected Guilford County Register of Deeds in 2004, Thigpen has provided many new services on top of traditional deeds services. He has put more records online, created a database of old slave ownership records and provided remote iPad birth registration for new parents at area hospitals. He has more projects in the pipeline that he’s not yet ready to reveal. There are rumors that Thigpen may be starting a drive-thru deeds service but the Rhino Times highly doubts that speculation. The Register of Deeds office is holding a special Passport Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 23 to promote the new service. Thigpen said his staff will be there to answer all questions and, since it will be on a Saturday, parking won’t be an issue. Thigpen didn’t say whether cotton candy would be served at his fair.

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    Uncle Orson Reviews Everything UNCLE ORSON Reviews www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 13 Exploding Yogurt, by Orson Scott Card The biggest problem with trivia games – even the wellwritten ones, like Trivial Pursuit – is assembling a group of people to play together. Let’s face it, when playing trivia games many people are at a great disadvantage, at least in certain categories. For years, I’ve had to play Trivial Pursuit with a severe handicap: the Sports & Leisure category. Not only do I know less than nothing about sports (that is, even the things I think I know are mostly wrong), but also it seems as though half the “leisure” questions are about alcoholic beverages, and as a Mormon, I have no idea what liquids are ingredients of various mixed drinks. Otherwise, I do pretty well. So there’s been many a game where my little wheel filled up with cheeses, except for Sports & Leisure, long before anyone else was close. But then I keep dancing around, failing to answer the sports questions, until somebody else fills their wheel and goes to the middle and wins. Even if I get one sports question Two Games, Thorns right, when I get into the middle my opponents only have to keep asking me sports questions and they have plenty of time to catch up and beat me. Then there’s the problem of brainholes, where some fact you’ve known your whole life suddenly falls out. I remember one game with a group of professors from the Watauga College program at App State, where all I needed in order to win was to come up with the capital on the Danube that is named for two cities that combined into one. I have known since fifth grade that the city is Budapest, Hungary, named for the cities of Buda and Pest. But at that moment, in that game, the only city that came to mind was Bucharest, the capital of Romania. I knew that Bucharest was doubly wrong – wrong city, wrong country – and when I found another capital that started with B it was Belgrade, which in those days was in Yugoslavia. I could not pull Budapest into my brain for love or money. So I gave up, missed the point ... and lost the game. “As God as my witness, I thought But hey, Trivial Pursuit is turkeys could fly”? WKRP in competitive and I always like the Cincinnati. people I’m playing with – even Most people of my generation don’t Gregg Keizer, who constantly (and even have to think to answer questions charmingly) murmurs “I know I like that. This makes it so that many know” while you’re struggling to younger people won’t play trivia come up with the answer. The game games with old coots like me anymore. provides the structure, but it’s the Of course, these whippersnappers good company that makes it fun. know the answers to all kinds of It’s less fun, though, when old coots questions dealing with recent (last 30 like me are playing against much years) pop music, especially rap. I younger players – college or high can’t tell one self-named rapper from school students in particular. They’re another, and I certainly can’t name old enough to feel embarrassed about any of their tracks, let alone their missing questions that they realize original names. Especially since the should be common knowledge, names keep changing. (Thanks, especially the history and geography Formerly Alive Artist Named Prince, questions. Yet half of those questions for getting that ball rolling.) are easy for people of my generation So I’m happy to tell you that there’s because we lived through them! a terrific, fast-moving, really fun Kennedy’s secretary of defense? trivia game called Five Second McNamara. Nixon’s first vice Rule that my wife and I have played president? Spiro Agnew. Songwriter successfully with our 9- and 11-yearold granddaughters. of “God Bless America”? Irving Berlin. Singer/songwriter of “You’re We knew they were having a good Having My Baby”? Paul Anka. TV time because we had several other series in which Gordon Jump says, (continued on page 14) Affordable quality you can trust...for over 35 years Looking at Buying a Pre-Owned Car? Ask about our pre-purchase inspections! Synthetic Oil Change...$99 95 Includes up to 7 quarts Castrol Syntec 5w30, fi lter and labor Annual Brake Fluid Change..$99 95 Coolant Change...........$99 95 2629 Randleman Road | www.kormanautoworks.com 336.275.1494

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    14 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com uncle orson (continued from page 13) favorite games on the table, waiting to be played, but they kept insisting that we play yet another quick game of Five Second Rule. There’s a subtitle, too. It’s really Five Second Rule: Just Spit It Out. And that pretty much describes the gameplay. First, there’s a box tightly filled with two-sided question cards. They all follow the same format: “Name three” and then some kind of person or object. Some of them are hard because they require actual knowledge: “Name three Chevrolets.” “Name three vice presidents.” “Name three Civil War battles.” But others ask questions that you can answer just by being alive. “Name three candy bars.” “Name three kinds of cake.” “Name three fast-food franchises.” Easy, right? Oh, no, I must inform you. Every question is hard – yet every question card will advance the game. That’s because you really do have only five seconds to spit out three examples in each category. The timer is my favorite timer in the history of games. Not some sad little hour-glass full of fine white sand, which you have to watch closely in order to see when time runs out. No, what you have is a plastic tube filled with tiny metal balls, with a horn at one end. We play it so the person answering the question holds the timer. The idea is that as soon as you understand the question – you have to pay attention to every word so that your answers actually fit the category – you turn over the timer, the horn toots and the metal balls roll noisily down a spiral ramp. In five seconds, the balls have all reached the bottom, and your turn is over. It sounds like a rain stick, only it’s faster. All it takes is a moment’s hesitation and you’ll find that you’ve said only two – or even one – answer when the time runs out. My friends and I teased one player all night because early on, she had the question, “Name three kitchen implements,” and she sat there tongue-tied and couldn’t get past the first one.” It was the tension that got to her. “I imagined opening the utensil drawer The support you need to find quality SENIOR LIVING SOLUTIONS INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE A Place for Mom has helped over one million families find senior living solutions that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors are trusted, local experts who can help you understand your options. Here’s what’s included with our free service: A dedicated local Advisor Help scheduling tours There’s no cost to you! CALL (855) 698-1910 ! We’re paid by our partner communities Hand-picked list of communities Move in support Full details and pricing and looked at what was in there. But I couldn’t remember the name of any of them.” But the same thing happened to all of us. We only teased her because she was so extravagantly frustrated at not being able to name anything in that drawer. You can sometimes be too clever for your own good. I got “Name three horses,” for instance. By the pattern of the game, the answer would be things like, “Palomino, thoroughbred, Clydesdale,” or “pinto, trotter, mustang,” or “Arabian, carriage horse, plowhorse.” But I had to be clever, so I set out to name three individual horses. “Trigger,” said I, thinking of Roy Rogers’ horse, and then “Flicka,” from the TV show My Friend Flicka. But once I started with fictional horses, I just couldn’t think of a third one fast enough, though the list is pretty long. Black Beauty, National Velvet, Silver (the Lone Ranger’s horse), Rocinante (Don Quixote’s), not to mention the Narnian horse Hwin ... I know way more than three fictional horses. As long as I was naming individual horses, why not famous racehorses? Seabiscuit, Citation, Secretariat, Man o’ War, Seattle Slew, Affirmed. And the most famous horse from antiquity, Bucephalus. Yeah, any of those and I could have aced the question. But I was thinking of screen horses and all I could think of before the five seconds were up was two. I certainly didn’t have time to change mental categories. So ... I outsmarted myself. However, I had fun naming individual horses because everybody else laughed in delight at my decision to game the category. Technically, I was answering the question. It didn’t say “Name three kinds of horse” or “breeds of horse,” it just said “Name three horses.” That’s why even questions this brief can be well- or badly written. This was a really good one because it left room for creativity and surprise. Of course there were categories in which the 9- and 11-year-olds couldn’t think of a single entry. But guess what? There were categories that they could ace, but in which my wife and I couldn’t think of a single example, not in time, anyway. The 9-year-old was supposed to ask a question of her older sister, and she started weeding the cards: “She won’t know this one,” “she won’t know this one.” I stopped her, because, “If she doesn’t know it, then the card goes to the next person, and the next person. And if nobody can do it, your sister will get the card after all.” When one person misses, the next person gets a chance – but they can’t use any of the answers that were already given when the timer was running. If somebody says more answers after the timer stops, then the next person can use them. About a fifth of the cards were awarded to the original recipient by default. But even the questions on which everyone fails are fun to try to answer. This game sounds easy, and it would be, if the name were Ten Second Rule. But getting three answers in five seconds is hard. If you had to name three novels, you’d be wise not to choose long titles, because most people can’t come up with and actually say “Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers and The Return of the King” in five seconds. And heaven help you if all three of your choices begin “Harry Potter and the....” That timer will run out before you finish the second title. Fortunately, there are no really mean questions, like “Name three George Eliot novels,” or “Name three people lying dead on the stage at the end of Hamlet.” Even though the box is chock full of cards, when you play a dozen games in a row (no more than 45 minutes), you start running out of cards. No problem. When you play the same card a second time, it isn’t any easier because no matter how long a mental list of category entries you have in your brain, getting them into and out of your mouth in five seconds is still hard and the game stays fun. There’s also a Five Second Rule Jr. game, so maybe it can be played by kids even younger than the ones we tried it with. But since we’ve played it with all-adult groups, and groups of different generations, I can say with confidence that anybody can have fun playing Five Second Rule. .... It happens that for my birthday, my youngest daughter got me a game that is much more challenging to play, but still really fun. Where Five Second Rule is fast-moving, the game of Concept requires some serious thinking. The game functions rather like Charades. From a card, you pick one from a list of nine things, divided into three easy, three medium and three hard ones. They’re all hard. Because instead of acting out the word or phrase, or drawing something to get the other players to say it as in Pictionary, you have to choose from a playing board filled with various icons – little pictures, each of which can suggest many different concepts. At first you might think that it’s like trying to tell a story with emojis, but (continued on page 36)

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    Page 15

    www.rhinotimes.com September 7, 2017 RHINO REALESTATE Everything you need to find, finance and buy the house of your dreams STAGING A HOUSE TO SELL BY SANDY GROOVER All the world’s a stage, and that includes your home – especially when it’s time to sell. And staging might just be the key to helping a house sell more quickly. (continued on page 16) LOCAL REALTOR DIRECTORY www.realestate.rhinotimes.com Wayne Young 336.253.4472 wayne.young@allentate.com www.allentate.com/wayneyoung Successfully selling homes for 30 years Betty Howard 336.337.7535 betty@bettyhoward.com Chidi Akwari 336.337.1927 Chidi@Akwari.com OPEN HOUSES • SEPTEMBER 10, 2017 • 2-4PM 3109 Wynnfield Drive High Point, NC 27265 3BR 2.5BA (844796) MooMoo Councill 336-457-0701 $250,000 3634 Sunset Hollow Drive High Point, NC 27265 3BR 3BA (839073) Alan Palmer 336-848-2600 $164,500 107 Arlington Drive Jamestown, NC 27282 5BR 3.5BA (831757) Ed Stafford 336-669-5106 $385,000 813 Ruskin Drive High Point, NC 27265 4BR 3.5BA (845059) Randall Allred 336-382-5135 $181,900 2502 N Tuckers Farm Court Colfax, NC 27235 3BR 4.5BA (844826) Kim Delahanty 612-644-2766 $325,000

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    16 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com REAL ESTATE The New York Times crossword puzzle No. 0827 ACROSS 1 Way around London, with “the” 5 E.R. V.I.P.s 8 Haunted house sound 13 Backflow preventer in a drain 18 Brief, as a visit 20 Sub 21 Oscar role for Vivien Leigh 22 Astonishing March Madness success, e.g. 24 He denied Christ three times 25 Device with a Retina display 26 The opposition 27 “Madame X” painter John Singer ____ 29 23-Across, literally? 33 Cozy 35 Actor ____ Buchholz of “The Magnificent Seven” 36 Epitome of simplicity 37 Sour 39 Spicy fare? 41 “Where America’s Day Begins” 43 Made an impression? 45 Iron: Fr. 46 Get ready to be dubbed 50 Machine-gun while flying low 52 Stereotypical oil tycoon Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION BY JEFF CHEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 54 Remains unused 56 Sweets 58 Take both sides? 60 Word on a jar 61 Muskmelon variety 65 Bombs developed in the 1950s 66 Some airport figures, for short 67 Eminently draft-worthy 68 Pitch 71 Wiped out 72 Middling 73 Plenty sore, with “off” 74 Heat 76 Antiparticle first observed in 1929 78 Noon, in Nantes 79 Disaster film? 82 Singer Simone 83 Doomed 85 N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Thomas 87 Ladies’ shoe fastener 91 Staff openings? 92 By way of 94 Wine bar order 96 Elusive 97 ____ Lenoir, inventor of the internalcombustion engine 100 Location of Waimea Valley 101 What one will never be, in golf 102 Tended, with “for” 104 Comedian’s stock in trade 106 118-Across, literally? 110 Africa’s oldest republic 112 Result of some plotting 114 Bingo square 115 Old Russian ruler known as “Moneybag” 116 Detective in a lab 122 Frisbees and such 123 Like spoiled kids 124 Metallic element that’s No. 21 on the periodic table 125 Like many concept cars 126 Gregor ____, protagonist in Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” 127 Snack food brand 128 Latin years DOWN 1 Sign of nervousness 2 Sea urchin, at a sushi bar 3 Declare verboten 4 Break off a romance 5 Takeaway, of a sort 6 When a baby is expected 7 1904 world’s fair city: Abbr. 8 Utilities, insurance, advertising, etc. 9 Loosely woven fabric with a rough texture 10 Try to find oneself? 11 ____ quotes 12 What a designated driver takes 13 Candy that fizzes in the mouth 14 New Hampshire 15 Gives stars to 16 Have no existence 17 Line usually on the left or right side 19 Tonto player of 2013 20 ____ characters (Chinese writing) 23 Murderer of Hamlet 28 Tuna, at a sushi bar 29 Doesn’t keep up 30 Go up against 31 Facial feature of the Bond villain Ernst Blofeld 32 Jargon 34 Runs for a long pass, say 38 One component of a data plan 40 What the prefix “tera- ” means 42 Contributed to the world 43 56-Down, literally? 44 “Don’t you ____!” 47 Line judge? 48 Home to the National Border Patrol Museum 49 Teacher’s unit 51 Funny Tina 53 Bubkes 55 60-Down, literally? 57 Stay 59 Setting eschewed by Hawaii: Abbr. 61 Capturer of some embarrassing gaffes 62 “The Iceman Cometh” playwright 63 Hospital sticker 64 Handling well 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 69 Winner of four 1990s-2000s golf majors 70 1953 Leslie Caron film 75 Other: Abbr. 77 Networking assets 80 “Ta-ta!” 81 Former world capital called “City of Lights” 84 Shift+8 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 86 “Everybody’s a comedian” 88 Certain cheap car, informally 89 Mathematician Turing 90 Apt rhyme for “fire” 93 Asked for a desk, say 95 That the sum of the numbers on a roulette wheel is 666, e.g. 98 Uganda’s Amin 99 Marsh birds 102 Showing politesse 103 Lower 105 International package deliverer 107 Desi of Desilu Productions 108 Show a bias 109 Nintendo game princess 110 Lens caps? 111 Where fighter jets are found: Abbr. 113 “Gangnam Style” hitmaker 117 ____ pro nobis (pray for us) 118 Sch. in Fort Collins 119 The dark side 120 Symbol on the flag of Argentina or Uruguay 121 “Eww, stop!” OPEN HOUSES • 2-4PM staging 615 Rotary Drive High Point, NC 27262 3BR 2BA (848312) Elizabeth Sheffi eld 336-259-7944 $144,500 CANCELLED 5110 Mountain Ash Court Greensboro, NC 27410 4BR 2.5BA (846642) Jennifer Moore 336-455-0023 $184,900 (continued from page 19) Staging, said Greensboro Realtor Angie Wilkie of Allen Tate Realtors, “entails decluttering, taking down personnel decor, neutralizing paint colors and rearranging furniture.” What Wilkie tries to achieve with the staging process is to help buyers to appreciate the standout qualities of the seller’s house – like crown molding, unique fl ooring and attractive windows – rather than getting hung up on the seller’s personal possessions. “You have to eliminate the distractions that prevent potential buyers from seeing the house itself,” says Wilkie. (continued on page 33)

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    Page 17

    STATE GOVERNMENT BUSINESS CRIME AND SAFETY Without governor’s signature, bill protecting free speech is law Global TransPark boondoggle is 25 Pair on a mission to teach self defense PAGE 5 PAGE 6 PAGE 8 A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF NEWS, ANALYSIS AND OPINION FROM THE JOHN LOCKE FOUNDATION CAROLINAJOURNAL.COM VOL. 26 • NO. 9 • SEPTEMBER 2017 • TRIAD EDITION Donor Privacy Should a light shine on your contributions to nonprofits? U.S. senators take aim at JLF BY KARI TRAVIS KARI TRAVIS ASSOCIATE EDITOR Paul Gessing wanted to pop the top on Santa Fe’s soda tax. That was all. The president of the libertarian Rio Grande Foundation never planned to file a lawsuit against the city. But when Santa Fe lawmakers accused him of violating a campaign finance ordinance and demanded to see his donor list, he thought he had no choice. The trouble began in March, when Santa Fe Mayor Javier Gonzales proposed a 2-cent-per-ounce tax on sugary beverages including soda, energy drinks, sports drinks, juice boxes, and even sweetened coffee. The revenue would fund a Pre-K program for the city, Gessing told Carolina Journal. a 501(c)(3) nonprofit The tax was bad news, RGF policy analysts said. Beverage prices would explode. The cost of a soda 12- pack would nearly double. Low-income families would suffer. On April 6, RGF released a website and video voicing their concerns. The goal was to tell voters what would happen if they greenlighted the plan. The same day RGF released the video, Gessing got a letter from the city’s attorneys. “They said, ‘If you go ahead with this, you’re going to have to disclose your donors.’ And that’s when I kind of freaked out a little bit.” RGF had done nothing illegal by IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit standards, Gessing said. They weren’t campaigning on behalf of a candidate. They weren’t engaged in inappropriate advocacy. “It was news to me. I was running around with my hair on fire for the next few days trying to figure out what to do going forward because it was totally unexpected.” RGF violated a city law, passed in 2015, that forces nonprofits to disclose donor information if they campaign on ballot initiatives, city attorneys said. Gessing appeared before the city ethics board, where he was forced to disclose the nonprofit that produced the website and video, as well as the name of the donor who funded the project. RGF decided to keep the continued PAGE 10 In July 2016, the John Locke Foundation, along with 47 other free-market public policy think tanks, came under fire from nine Democratic U.S. senators, who accused the organizations of forming a “web of denial” about the role of human activity in climate change. Lawmakers debated the issue for two days in the Senate and threatened to go after JLF using laws meant to crack down on organized crime. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in other circumstances, that such tactics violate the First Amendment. Representatives of the free-market groups sent the senators a letter, dated July 12, saying the “enemies list” was a threat. “There is a heavy and inconvenient cost to disagreeing with you. Calls for debate will be met with political retribution. That’s called tyranny. And we reject it,” the letter stated. continued PAGE 11 GET MORE CAROLINA JOURNAL SUBSCRIBE TODAY! CarolinaJournal.com 919-828-3876 This version of Carolina Journal, inserted into your local weekly, consists of just 16 pages of the full 24-page CJ statewide edition. Interview with Mark Johnson Superintendent of Public Instruction talks about lawsuit with State Board of Education. PAGE 14 CAROLINA JOURNAL 200 W. MORGAN STREET, #200 RALEIGH, NC 27601 CJ ONLINE jlf.carolina.journal @carolinajournal www.carolinajournal.com editor@carolinajournal.com

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    CJ 2 CAROLINA JOURNAL // SEPTEMBER 2017 QUICK TAKES ‘Brunch bill’ a big hit across state EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rick Henderson @deregulator MANAGING EDITOR John Trump @jtrump21 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Don Carrington dcarrington@carolinajournal.com ASSOCIATE EDITORS Mitch Kokai @mitchkokai Lindsay Marchello @LynnMarch007 Kari Travis @karilynntravis Dan Way @danway_carolina DESIGNER Greg de Deugd gdedeugd@johnlocke.org PUBLISHED BY The John Locke Foundation 200 W. Morgan St., # 200 Raleigh, N.C. 27601 (919) 828-3876 • Fax: 821-5117 www.JohnLocke.org Kory Swanson President & Publisher John Hood Chairman Bill Graham, John M. Hood Ted Hicks, Christine Mele Brad Muller, Paul Slobodian David Stover, J.M Bryan Taylor Edwin Thomas Board of Directors Carolina Journal is a monthly journal of news, analysis, and commentary on state and local government and public policy issues in North Carolina. ©2017 by The John Locke Foundation Inc. All opinions expressed in bylined articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors of CJ or the staff and board of the John Locke Foundation. Material published herein may be reprinted as long as appropriate credit is given. Submissions and letters are welcome and should be directed to the editor. To subscribe, call 919-828-3876. Readers also can request Carolina Journal Weekly Report, delivered each weekend by e-mail, or visit CarolinaJournal.com for news, links, and exclusive content updated each weekday. Those interested in education, economics, higher education, health care or local government also can ask to receive weekly e-letters covering these issues. Residents of municipalities and counties throughout North Carolina from Wilmington to Asheville and in more than 100 localities in between can start their Sundays with a cocktail. All of North Carolina’s larger cities, including Raleigh, Charlotte, Greensboro, and, lately, Durham and Fayetteville, have embraced earlier Sunday alcohol sales. A provision allowing restaurants to begin selling liquor at 10 a.m. Sunday — as opposed to noon — was a big part of Senate Bill 155. Alternately known as the “brunch bill,” Gov. Roy Cooper signed it into law June 30. The bill also allows craft distillers to sell five bottles to customers each year and allows the distillers to offer tastings at festivals and other events. The tastings are contingent on local approval, as are the Sunday brunch sales. The North Carolina Restaurant and Lodging Association lobbied hard for the bill throughout the legislative process. “North Carolina offers 18,000 restaurants and SENATE BILL 155. A provision allowing restaurants to begin selling liquor at 10 a.m. Sunday — as opposed to noon — was a big part of Senate Bill 155. THE STATE BOARD of Education approved teacher pay pilot programs in six school districts to start in the 2017-18 school year. Currently, teacher pay is tied to the number of years a teacher spends in the classroom. Sometimes local school districts supplement teacher salaries. Terry Stoops, vice president of research and director of education studies at the John Locke Foundation, argued against this model, saying it can drive quality teachers away from schools. “Paying them based on experience and credentials is really a disincentive for our top-performing teachers to stay in the system,” Stoops said. Essentially, a teacher who has been performing adequately for 10 years can be paid substantially more than an excellent teacher with only three years under her belt. “If I’m a great teacher and I’m only three years in the profession, then I start to ask myself, ‘Why am I staying here, and what incentive do I have to drive my students to do better and drive myself to be a better teacher if I’m simply paid for how long I stay here?’” Stoops asked. 1,800 hotels,” NCRLA President and CEO Lynn Minges said in a statement. “As communities across the state give consideration to this issue, we want to do all we can to assist the governmental process, in turn, better serving those visiting our great state.” Backing that up, the association prepared a “Brunch Bill Ordinance Toolkit,” which includes talking points on why the bill should be adopted on a local level and on how to communicate about the bill with local officials, the group’s website says. “Before passage of S.B. 155,” says one point, “North Carolina was one of only three states with no on-premise Sunday morning alcohol sales. Twenty-one other states permit earlier Sunday sales uniformly through state law. The remaining 26 either regulate Sunday morning alcohol sales entirely at the local level or allow local A change was needed, so in 2015 the General Assembly called for the state board to implement pilot programs in local districts to see whether an alternative teacher pay governments to opt in or opt out of a state law allowing for the earlier sales.” Says another, “More than 55 million people travel to North Carolina annually, many of which are from countries and states that do not have laws restricting alcohol service on Sundays. This leaves guests confused when our members have to refuse service until noon.” Some North Carolina lawmakers argued vehemently against the bill, saying people would leave church early and head to the bar, and drunkards would disrupt Sunday services. Beer and wine, some said, well, they’re here, and we must live with it. But not whiskey and the like. Fayetteville opted for the brunch ordinance Aug. 14. New Bern, which held out originally, also recently signed on. “We’re really excited,” Ricky Biggs, senior manager of a Fayetteville Bonefish Grill told The Fayetteville Observer. “We have been waiting for this for a long time. It’s going to boost business for us.” — From staff reports State Board of Education approves teacher pay pilot programs for six school districts NEW TEACHER PAY PROGRAM COMING. Currently, teacher pay is tied to the number of years a teacher spends in the classroom. model could keep quality teachers in schools and improve student performance. Lawmakers approved $10.2 million over the next three years for the plan. Twelve districts applied for the program, but only six were chosen. Chapel Hill-Carrboro, Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Pitt, Edgecombe, Vance, and Washington school districts all got the green light to roll out their programs. Each pilot program is different, but they all include linking teacher pay to professional growth and performance, with some plans including bonuses for improving student test scores. “Localities often have better ideas,” Stoops argued. “They have a greater understanding of their teaching staff and what the needs are, so giving them the ability of broad experimentation is a better approach.” Representatives of the State Board of Education could not be reached for comment. — From staff reports

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    CAROLINA JOURNAL // SEPTEMBER 2017 QUICK TAKES Governor’s Teacher Advisory Committee snubs charter schools OF THE 25 MEMBERS on Gov. Roy Cooper’s Teacher Advisory Committee, not one teaches at a charter school — even though enrollment at charters has surpassed the six-figure mark. The governor in August issued Executive Order 16, which established the Teacher Advisory Committee. Comprising teachers and support personnel picked by Cooper, the committee will act as education ambassadors on behalf of the governor at designated events. But the omission of charter school teachers is likely not a mistake. It’s also noteworthy because one pick for the committee is Mark Jewell, president of the state’s Public charter school leaders should be outraged that Cooper and his staff intentionally excluded charter teachers from the Teacher Advisory Committee. main teachers’ association, the North Carolina Association of Educators. While Cooper’s office failed to respond to questions asking why charter school teachers were excluded, he has established a record of favoring traditional public schools over school-choice alternatives including public charter schools and scholarships for low-income and disabled students. In his proposed budget, the governor did not include any funding for Opportunity Scholarships, a program which helps low-income families send their children to a nonpublic school. When the General Assembly presented Cooper with its version of the budget, Cooper accused lawmakers of draining funding from public schools to pay for private school vouchers. The governor also claimed in a lawsuit the legislature’s budget was unconstitutional because it set aside a decade’s worth of funding for Opportunity Scholarships. Terry Stoops, vice president of research and director of education studies at the John Locke Foundation, also criticized the governor’s decision to exclude charter school teachers. “Public charter school leaders should be outraged that Cooper and his staff intentionally excluded charter teachers from the Teacher Advisory Committee,” Stoops argued. “Their contempt for charter schools, which will likely employ around 6,000 teachers and educate over 100,000 students this school year, is comically misguided.” — From staff reports Federal Right to Try bill could bypass FDA bottleneck Right to Try is gaining momentum across the country, yet states worry a cumbersome federal approval process will continue to inhibit patients’ access to experimental drugs. The Food and Drug Administration allows health care providers access to experimental drugs and procedures, but the process can take months, which frustrates terminally ill patients searching for a cure. Right to Try advocates are hopeful Congress will continue advancing federal legislation backed by the Trump administration. In North Carolina, House Bill 652 opened the door in 2015 for terminally ill patients to try experimental drugs or procedures, but only after exhausting all other options. The patient’s doctor must also provide a recommendation for the treatment, and patients are required to give “informed consent” before going forward. The bill passed unanimously in the House and Senate. Former Gov. Pat McCrory signed H.B. 652 into law in July 2015. “There is tons of bipartisan support for this issue,” Starlee Coleman, a senior policy adviser at the Goldwater Institute, said. “Red states, blue states, purple states all support this. It is passing unanimously and is signed by Democratic governors and Republican governors. It is truly nonpartisan and is something that has an overwhelming groundswell of grass-roots support.” The expanded access program, sometimes called the compassionate use waiver, is a formal way for terminally ill patients to ask permission from the FDA to use experimental treatments. Going through the process is time-consuming. The FDA has a month to determine whether to grant or deny the request, and any questions restart the entire review process. Finally the Institutional Review Board must decide whether to approve the patient’s application. Thirty-seven states have Right to Try laws, and the other 13 have introduced legislation toward that end. The Goldwater Institute, a free-market public policy think tank, has championed Right to Try legislation across the country. Right to Try laws, such as North Carolina’s, bypass the FDA waiver program and shorten the process to receive treatment. Advocates for Right to Try laws continue to push for a federal law that would prevent the FDA from superseding the state. When state law and federal law conflict with each other, it is the federal government that usually wins through the supremacy clause in the U.S. Constitution. Prospect of compensation could lead to more matches With bone marrow donors in short supply, thousands of cancer patients die every year waiting for a match. A life-saving means of encouraging more donors may soon be at hand. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has withdrawn a controversial proposed regulation barring bone marrow donors from receiving payment for their donation. Under the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, donating an organ for payment is a crime with punishment ranging from a fine of $50,000 or up to five years in jail. In 2013, the Obama administration proposed a rule expanding the definition of human organs to include bone marrow, which made receiving payment for bone marrow donations illegal under NOTA. The Institute for Justice, a nonprofit libertarian public-interest law firm, has long argued to allow bone marrow donors to get compensation. It even filed a lawsuit in 2009 against U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. In 2012, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in Flynn v. Holder that the most common method for donating bone marrow called apheresis did not fall under NOTA restrictions. Michele Goodwin, the chancellor’s professor of law at the University of California-Irvine and the director of the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy, says public opinion toward donor compensation is changing, but CJ 3 the federal government has yet to catch up to the trend. She suggested a fear of exploitation might explain the resistance to allow donor compensation. “The concern is that vulnerable people would sign up for this and vulnerable people would be exploited,” Goodwin explained. “Here’s where the theory has not matched the problem. Bone marrow can save a life. Bone marrow is also regenerative, so it’s not as if when someone donates bone marrow that they have now depleted it all for themselves.” With 11,000 Americans in desperate need of bone marrow transplants, finding donors is a challenge. According to IJ, only 30 percent of patients who need a bone marrow transplant have a matching donor in their family. The remaining 70 percent must find a match on the national registry, but it takes time to find a matching donor, something patients have in short supply. By withdrawing the proposed rule, HHS opens the door for organizations to provide financial incentives to encourage more people to become bone marrow donors. Organizations don’t have to offer direct cash payment either, as Goodwin points to other ways in which donors can be compensated such as mortgage subsidies, tax write-offs, or help with college tuition. MoreMarrowDonors, a California based nonprofit, plans to compensate donors with a $3,000 scholarship, housing allowance, or a charitable donation of the donor’s choice if they donate bone marrow. With the rule gone, MoreMarrow- Donors and others like it can move forward with plans to ease the donor shortage. — From staff reports

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    CJ 4 CAROLINA JOURNAL // SEPTEMBER 2017 STATE GOVERNMENT Bill could shine light on criminal penalties issued by licensing boards BY LINDSAY MARCHELLO Lawmakers seem to realize the problem with overcriminalization, or at least with the organization of criminal statutes. It’s entirely possible for people to commit a crime in North Carolina without even realizing it. A bill to recodify the criminal code may help some people stay on the right side of the law, but countless others have mistakenly committed crimes. They’re not burglars or con artists, but rather just people who are trying to make a living. Each of their stories has one thing in common: occupational licensing. Buried in hundreds of pages of criminal statutes are regulation and licensing offenses. Unlike traditional crimes, the offenses don’t require that a person know their actions are wrong to be found guilty. In December 2011, the N.C. Board of Dietetics/Nutrition told health blogger Steve Cooksey he was committing a crime. The offense? Cooksey added an advice column to his Paleolithic diet blog and answered readers’ questions on health and diet. He wasn’t a licensed nutritionist, but he argued the advice he provided was protected by the First Amendment. He joined with the Institute for Justice in a lawsuit against the board and won. Earlier that year, Steven Pruner was found guilty of selling hot dogs near Duke University Medical Center without a permit and was sentenced to a 45-day jail term. His sentence was suspended, but he was placed on 12 months’ unsupervised probation — all for selling unlicensed hot dogs. In a much larger case, the U.S. Supreme Court got involved in a licensing dispute in 2014 over the N.C. Board of Dental Examiners’ ban on nondentists providing services to whiten teeth. The court ruled against the dental examiners board, arguing the ban violated antitrust laws under the Federal Trade Commission. Lawmakers seem to realize the problem with overcriminalization, or at least with the organization of criminal statutes. Senate Bill 114, or the Annual Reports, Property Tax, and Recodification Commission, may help North Carolina’s criminal codes become more accessible and easier for people to understand. The bill would create the Criminal Code Recodification Commission under Section 10 of S.B. 114. The commission, with Chief Justice Mark Martin’s supervision, would be responsible for drafting a streamlined criminal code for lawmakers to review. Part of Section 10 requires all agencies, boards, and commissions with the ability to create criminal offenses to provide the Criminal Code Recodification Commission a list of all criminal penalties. The licensing agencies have until Dec. 1 of each year to submit their reports. Sen. Andy Wells, R-Catawba, one of the primary sponsors of S.B. 114, said Rep. Dennis Riddell, R-Alamance, introduced Section 10 to the bill while it was in the House. Riddell could not be reached for comment. “It is entirely possible to commit a crime without knowing it,” Wells said. “There are 55 licensing boards in North Carolina, and some deal with multiple licenses.” The bill is in the Committee on Rules and Operations in the Senate. While occupational licensing isn’t the primary focus of S.B. 114, the bill opens the door for increased scrutiny over how licensing boards operate in North Carolina. “One of the many virtues of this recodification proposal is that it will give the legislature a chance to review the crimes that have been created by these agencies and boards and decide which, if any, of them should be a part of North Carolina’s criminal code,” Jon Guze, director of legal studies at the John Locke Foundation, said. Another aspect of S.B. 114 looks to see whether administrative agencies should even have the authority to criminalize behavior. “Under the separation of powers guaranteed by the North Carolina Constitution, crimes should only be created by the General Assembly, not by administrative agencies appointed by the executive branch, and certainly not by self-interested private licensing boards,” Guze explained. North Carolina isn’t alone in looking into occupational licensing. U.S. Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, in July introduced a bill aimed at reining in licensing boards at the federal level while also protecting them from antitrust litigation. Eric Boehm, a reporter for Reason, noted that Lee’s bill would give states two ways to gain immunity: “The first by bringing state licensing boards under direct supervision by the legislative and executive branches. The second by requiring states to show why a certain licensing requirement is necessary to protect public health and safety.” FIRST IN FREEDOM Transforming Ideas into Consequences for North Carolina In First in Freedom the John Locke Foundation’s president and research staff apply the timeless ideas of 20th-century conservative thinkers to such 21st-century challenges as economic stagnation, tax and regulatory burdens, and educational mediocrity. Available at: JohnLockeStore.com

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