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Rhino Times - 2017-09-07
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-09-07 00:00:00
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    Vol. V No. 36 Greensboro, North Carolina www.rhinotimes.com Thursday, September 7, 2017 High Point, Guilford Stadium Skirmish Continues plus Under The Hammer, Uncle Orson Reviews Everything AND MORE

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    TAYLOR'S DISCOUNT TIRE 2 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com The Weekly Hammer THE WEEKLY Hammer Why Labor Day by John Hammer Labor Day is the unofficial end of summer. The official end of summer is Sept. 22. In odd numbered years like this one, it is also the unofficial kickoff of the City Council campaign season. In keeping with that, a lot of political campaign signs went up over the long weekend. Doesn’t Get a Parade It’s appropriate that Labor Day is the kickoff of the campaign season because there cannot be a more political holiday. Following the Pullman Strike of 1894 – where the US Army was called out and killed some strikers – Congress and President Grover Cleveland were looking for a way to make peace with the unions (or to be more accurate were looking for a way to win union votes) and a few days after the strike Labor Day became a national holiday. Until I looked it up, I didn’t know that Labor Day was a day to celebrate unions. I’ve never been a fan of unions, but you have to take holidays when you can get them. It is kind of amazing that Labor Day has survived when so many holidays seem to have fallen by the wayside – at least as far as businesses are concerned. The federal government continues to close down for all kinds of holidays that nobody else has recognized in decades. But the fact that Labor Day should be called Union Day explains why, at least in North Carolina, there is no big celebration. In fact, unlike other holidays, there are virtually no traditional Labor Day events. Other holidays’ traditions include people dressing up in red white and blue and marching around the neighborhood; setting off loud, colorful and dangerous explosive devices; having traditional big family arguments over whether dinner should be served hot or after the football game ends; toting dead trees into the house; requiring late night drinking; running around the yard looking for wildly colored chicken embryos that were reportedly distributed by a large lagomorph; or children going from house to house threatening homeowners with dire consequences if they don’t hand over some candy. Often things that don’t make sense are because of politics, and Labor Day seems to fit the mold. There is no tradition for Labor Day because it was invented for mostly political reasons. It’s not like other holidays where the government recognized a celebration already taking place as worthy of a holiday. In some states school doesn’t start until after Labor Day, which is a mixed (continued on next page) Count on us to keep you on the go with our expert service and the long-lasting value of MICHELIN ® tires. STOP IN TODAY! More miles. With the safety you expect. THE NEW MICHELIN ® DEFENDER ® TIRE. Taylor’s Discount Tire 2100 E. Cone Blvd Fair, honest pricing Family owned and operated TAYLORSDISCOUNTTIRE.COM (336) 375-8883 MON - FRI 7:30 - 5:30, SAT 6:00 - 12:30 NO HIDDEN TIRE INSTALLATION FEES NO HIDDEN TPMS RESET FEES FREE ROTATION AND BALANCE FOR LIFE OF TIRES Life never stops moving. So take on every mile – and be there for every moment – with Michelin’s longest-lasting tire. * * Based on commissioned third-party wear test results in tire size 225/55R17 97H vs. Goodyear® Assurance® TripleTred™ All-Season and Continental® TrueContact™ tires in size 225/55R17 97H, and Pirelli® P4™ Four Seasons+ tire in size 225/55R17 97T, on a 2016 Chevrolet Malibu; and in tire size 205/55R16 91H vs. Bridgestone® Turanza™ Serenity Plus tire in size 205/55R16 91H on a 2015 Honda Civic. Actual on-road results may vary. Copyright © 2017 Michelin North America, Inc. All rights reserved. The Michelin Man is a registered trademark owned by Michelin North America, Inc.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 3 hammer (continued from previous page) table of CONTENTS 2 WEEKLY HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 6 MOST MONEY RAISED SO FAR IS IN DISTRICT CITY COUNCIL RACES BY JOHN HAMMER 8 GUILFORD AND HIGH POINT TAKE SWINGS AT ONE ANOTHER OVER BASEBALL STADIUM BY SCOTT D. YOST 8 HIGH POINT HOLDS STAR-SPANGLED BASEBALL STADIUM RALLY BY SCOTT D. YOST 10 STATE OF COMMUNITY BETTER THAN PEOPLE THINK BY SCOTT D. YOST 12 DEEDS OFFICE HAS YOUR PASSPORT TO FAST SERVICE BY SCOTT D. YOST 13 UNCLE ORSON BY ORSON SCOTT CARD 17 CAROLINA J O U R N A L 37 YOST COLUMN BY SCOTT D. YOST 47 UNDER THE HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 4 RHINO SHORTS 15 REAL ESTATE 16 NYT CROSSWORD 33 PUZZLE ANSWERS 33 CHILDREN’S SCHEDULE 35 SOUND OF THE BEEP 39 SUDOKU 40 NEWS OF THE WEIRD 42 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR blessing for students. They don’t have to go to school in the middle of summer, but they don’t get a day off for Labor Day because they aren’t in school yet. But you probably wouldn’t fi nd too many students who would make that trade – starting school early so they would get a one-day holiday. Growing up, Labor Day was always the day that the pool closed for the summer. I remember one year when my sister, who was a student at Page had gone swimming across the street at Sherwood Swim and Racquet Club during lunch the first week of school, and got in trouble for going to class with wet hair. The teacher couldn’t really figure out what rule she had violated, but was certain there was some regulation that said you couldn’t go swimming at lunch, or at the very least that students could not come to his class with wet hair. As an adult I do look forward to Labor Day because it is also the end of the summer season at the beach, which means the rental rates go down. The weather is still warm enough to enjoy the ocean (as long as a hurricane is not on its way), the beaches are much less crowded and, at some beaches, it means that my four-legged companion is allowed to romp in the sand. But I also have to admit some personal animosity toward Labor Day because, growing up, Labor Day was always the fi rst Monday in September while Memorial Day, the unofficial beginning of summer, was May 30. I blame the success of Labor Day as a long weekend with the decision to change Memorial Day from the perfectly acceptable May 30 date to the fi nal Monday in May so it could match Labor Day. May 30 happens to be my birthday, and I liked the fact that it was always a holiday. Now it’s a holiday only one out of seven years or so, and I’m sure it’s Labor Day’s fault. If they ever change Independence Day to the fi rst Monday in July, I hope the wh ole country will protest along with me. Cover: Scenes from the 2016 National Folk Festival. Photos by Sandy Groover PUBLISHER Roy Carroll EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John Hammer managing editor ELAINE HAMMER county editor SCOTT D. YOST GENERAL MANAGER Joann Zollo creative director ANTHONY COUNCIL advertising consultant DONNA GOODWIN contributing editor ORSON SCOTT CARD 216 West Market Street, Greensboro NC 27401 P.O. Box 9023, Greensboro NC 27429 | (336) 763-4170 (336) 763-2585 fax | sales@rhinotimes.com | www.rhinotimes.com

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    4 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com RHINOSHORTS by John Hammer The folks who live near the Shops at Friendly who managed to stop a Trader Joe’s from locating on the corner of Hobbs Road and Friendly Avenue might be interested in a report from Business Insider released last month. According to a study of home prices, those living near a Trader Joe’s saw their property values increase 67 percent over the past five years. Living near a Whole Foods, by comparison, resulted in a 52 percent increase and near an Aldi a 51 percent increase. So their property values would have increased and the rest of Greensboro would have had a Trader Joe’s if the protests had not been so vehement as to make Trader Joe’s decide it really didn’t want to do business in Greensboro. to city hall twice. The good news is that when the City Council doesn’t meet it can’t do anything, and if it doesn’t do anything it can’t do anything wrong. So one way to look at it is that by not meeting the Greensboro City Council has made Greensboro a better place. Politico ran a cartoon last week portraying white Houston residents as dumb Southern racist Christian redneck cowboys who love their state and are proud of their heritage. So the cartoonist managed to get in just about every stereotype of white Texans in one cartoon. It was evidently considered appropriate by the Politico editors because everyone at Politico has learned to accept the fact that Southerners are stupid Christian racists who are proud of their heritage. Despite that, the editors say they don’t have anything against Southerners. In fact, some of their best friends are Southerners. Newspapers are rightly accused of writing about an issue and then not following up to tell people what happened. So not to fall into that trap, here is an update on the story about the easements that Rocky Scarfone has through what will be a downtown city parking deck with a Westin Hotel on top of it between East Market Street and across February One Place behind the Elm Street Center. At-large City Councilmember Mike Barber on Wednesday said, “I think we’re close to a solution.” He said, “The goal must be that all of these businesses downtown are compatible.” Barber added, “It’s a lot better to solve it now before the parking deck is built.” The easements reported on last week do exist and reportedly parts of the city parking deck are being redesigned to honor those two easements – one to East Market Street and one to South Davie Street – so that Scarfone will have the access to the back of the Cone Denim Entertainment Center building to which he is entitled. The Greensboro City Council is made up of eight Democrats and one Republican, but it appears the current City Council is taking its lead from our current Republican Congress, which didn’t meet in August and is only meeting for 12 days in September. The Greensboro City Council only met once in July, once in August and is meeting once in September. In the old days, like earlier this year, the City Council met three times a month. It held two formal meetings and a more informal work session. Under the current leadership, the work sessions have been shortened from half-day sessions to maybe an hour, and they are held right before the meeting when everyone is in a hurry to get to the formal meeting. Maybe it’s to save gas so councilmembers don’t have to drive National Folk Festival Starts Friday by John Hammer The third and final National Folk Festival in Greensboro kicks off on Friday, Sept. 8 at 6 p.m. with the Treme Brass Band on the Wrangler Stage on North Elm Street in front of the Wrangler headquarters. Then there is a parade and, until 10 p.m., music and entertainment. Saturday, Sept. 9, the festival begins at noon and runs until 10 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 10, the final day of the final National Folk Festival in Greensboro, the activities begin at noon and end at 6 p.m. With eight stages scheduled over three days with entertainment from hip hop to classic country, gospel and jazz, it’s impossible to list everything in the space provided. But there is something for everyone and it’s free. All you need to do to be a part of the folk festival is come downtown. But you probably need to get a schedule because you can’t be everywhere at once. Along with the music there are also poets, storytellers, dancers, trick ropers, games for children and, of course, food. A great variety of food will be featured at the folk festival and, while the music and entertainment is free, the food isn’t. So you might want to bring a few dollars, not just to eat but also to make a donation to help pay for all the free entertainment. Along with the entertainment stages there is a North Carolina Folk Life area that features arts and crafts.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 5

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    6 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Big Money Raised in City Council Races by John Hammer Follow the money is always good advice in politics. If you are betting on political races, the safe bet is always on the candidate who raises the most money. There are exceptions – our current president is one – and a challenger usually has to raise considerably more money than the incumbent to unseat them. But all things being equal, the candidate who raises the most money usually wins. The pre-primary campaign financial reports for the Greensboro City Council candidates, which cover all the money raised through August 29, were due on Tuesday, Sept. 5. With the primary on Tuesday, Oct. 10, there is still plenty of time to raise money but this pre-primary report gives a good idea of who is winning the money race. The whole election is strange. Although 38 candidates filed, five have since dropped out, bringing the total number of candidates that are still running down to 33. But because they all dropped out too late to be removed from the ballot, all 38 names will be on the ballot for the Oct. 10 primary. The two biggest fundraisers so far in this election are both running in district races. They have both raised more money than any of the mayoral candidates or anyone running at large. District 4 City Councilmember Nancy Hoffmann is known as a prodigious fundraiser and, as usual, Hoffmann has far outstripped everyone else in fundraising, having raised $61,830 this election cycle, which added to the $11,569 she already had in her campaign account, gave her a total of $73,399. Hoffmann has already spent $28,450, which is more than most of the candidates will raise and spend during the entire election, and she has $44,950 in her campaign account going into the primary. Hoffmann not only raises a lot of money, she has always made good use of her campaign funds, running an efficient and professional campaign. Although there will be two other District 4 candidates on the ballot, Andrew Belford has dropped out meaning her only opponent is Gary Kenton, who has not filed his preprimary report yet, but as of July 27 he had raised $3,025, and $2,000 of that is a loan from Kenton to the campaign. It is not unusual for candidates to loan money to their campaigns. It is often done to give the campaign a little operating capital, until the fundraising kicks in. District 3 Councilmember Justin Outling is number two on the list for the most money raised with $46,600 and he had $1,182 in his campaign account for a total of $47,782 available. Outling has spent $8,666, so he is in pretty good shape going into the primary with $39,117 in his campaign account. His only opponent who is raising money and filing reports is District 3 City Council candidate Craig Martin, who has raised $1,867 and spent $841, so he has $1,026 in his campaign account. District 3 City Council candidate Antuan Marsh filed a “Certificate of Threshold” statement to not raise or spend more than $1,000, so he has no campaign finance reporting to do. Payton McGarry will be on the ballot but has dropped out of the race. Mayor Nancy Vaughan, who is running for reelection, has raised $5,750 and has $28,323 in her campaign account for a total of $34,073. She has spent $11,774 and has $22,299 going forward into the primary. In 2015, Vaughan ran against Sal Leone and Devin King. Vaughan defeated King in the general election, winning 88 percent of the vote, so she didn’t need to spend much. Dianne Moffett, who registered to vote in Greensboro and filed to run for mayor on the same day, has raised a total of $24,752 and spent $11,122, so she has cash on hand of $13,799. Moffett loaned her campaign committee $5,132 and the campaign committee has paid her back $1,500, so the numbers on the campaign finance report are a little difficult to follow. Mayoral candidate John Brown, according to his campaign finance report, has raised $10,551 and spent $6,240, leaving him a balance of $4,312 going into the primary season. It appears that Brown has put $7,239 in loans and cash into his own campaign. Regardless of how much of his own money Brown has spent, he is well behind the other two candidates in fundraising. Brown formed his campaign committee in August 2016, nearly a year before filing opened for municipal races. Often a candidate will form a campaign committee early to get a head start on raising money, but Brown also filed a threshold statement that he wouldn’t raise or spend more than $1,000. He withdrew his threshold statement on July 25, 2017, RHINO TIMES BUSINESS AND which allowed him to raise and spend campaign funds. However, according to his campaign finance statement, he contributed over $3,500 to his own campaign before withdrawing the threshold statement on July 25. Campaign finance reports can be amended and often are because of some of the arcane rules, and the forms are not the least bit user friendly. The at-large race looks daunting on paper, with 15 candidates filing to run. But as far as campaign finance reports, it’s not too tough. At-large candidates Tijuana Hayes, Sylvine Hill, James Ingram and Andy Nelson all signed threshold statements that they would not raise or spend more than $1,000, which means they don’t have to file financial reports. It also means they have almost no chance of winning. Greensboro is a city of over 280,000 people and there is simply no way to let people know that you are running, much less why you are running, without spending some money. People may feel like they shouldn’t have to raise money to run for office and, of course, they don’t. But they do have to raise money if they expect to win, particularly running in a citywide race with 15 candidates. One of the reasons that incumbents have a huge advantage is simply name recognition, and these candidates that aren’t raising money also have almost no name recognition. Then there are Irving Allen, M.A. Bakie, Dianne Bellamy-Small, Lindy Perry-Garnette and Dan Jackson, who (continued on next page) SERVICE DIRECTORY For information to advertise in our Directory call (336) 763-4170 Reach over 50,000 in our Service Directory. Reserve your space by calling (336) 763-4170 or emailing sales@rhinotimes.com

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 7 money RE-ELECT (continued from previous page) evidently missed the Tuesday deadline for filing their pre-primary campaign fi nance reports, so there is no current information available on how much money they have raised. And that leaves the candidates who are raising money and did fi le their reports. At-large City Councilmember Mike Barber and first-time candidate Michelle Kennedy are running neck and neck in fundraising and are far ahead of anyone else in the race for which information is available. At-large City Councilmember Mike Barber has raised $20,951. But since he had $4,395 in his account, his total is $25,345. Of that he has spent $14,055, so Barber has $11,290 going forward. The total raised includes a $5,000 loan from Barber to his campaign Kennedy has actually raised more in this election cycle, at $21,660, and being a first-time candidate didn’t have any money in her campaign account to add to her total. But she has only spent $2,756, so she has $18,904 available. Although the candidate with most money usually wins, Mayor Pro Tem Yvonne Johnson is one of those candidates who doesn’t fi t the mold. Johnson has never lost an at-large race for City Council despite often not being the best financed candidate. Johnson has raised $6,510 for this election. She started off with $2,044 in her campaign account for a total of $8,554, and has spent $1,926, so she has $6,627 going into the primary season. At-large City Councilmember Marikay Abuzuaiter raised $4,235 and had $1,329 in her campaign account for a total of $5,564. Abuzuaiter has spent $2,791 and has $2,772 in her account. At-large City Council candidate Dave Wils has raised $3,894 so far for this election, and since he is a fi rst-time candidate he didn’t have any leftover money in a campaign account to carry forward. Wils has spent $523, so he has $3,371 at this point in the primary season. Wils is the only candidate in the race who filed his campaign finance reports electronically, which means they are completely legible. Most candidates fi lled their reports out by hand and some people don’t have great penmanship. It would be a great blessing to all those looking at campaign information if more candidates used this electronic feature so there is no question about the numbers or the names. Certainly in the future, as more younger candidates run, the idea of filling a form out by hand will be so foreign to them that they won’t even consider it. They will probably fi ll out their campaign fi nance reports on their phones. Those are all the pre-primary reports fi led by at-large candidates. No doubt more will be coming in as candidates discover they were supposed to fi le a report this week. In District 1, City Councilmember Sharon Hightower, who is running for reelection, has not fi led her pre-primary report. District 1 candidate Devin King hasn’t fi led anything other than fi ling to run. He hasn’t fi led a campaign organizational report, a mid-year report or a pre-primary report. District 1 City Council candidate Paula Ritter-Lipscomb fi led a threshold statement that she wouldn’t raise or spend over $1,000 so she didn’t have to fi le a report. District 2 City Councilmember Goldie Wells, who was appointed in July to serve out the term of former City Councilmember Jamal Fox, has the advantage of being the incumbent and also having apparently raised the most money in her race. Wells has raised $2,645, plus she had $125 in her account when this election cycle started. She has spent $1,835 and has $935 in her campaign account. C.J. Brinson has raised $730, spent $468 and has $262 in his campaign account. Former City Councilmember and current candidate Jim Kee did not have a pre-primary report on fi le. There is more big money being raised in the District 5 City Council race, where a challenger, Tami Thurm, has raised more money than the incumbent City Councilmember Tony Wilkins, who happens to be the lone Republican on the council. Thurm has raised $27,100, which at one time was considered a lot of money for a district council race. Thurm has spent $13,527 and has $13,573 in her campaign account. Wilkins is not far behind. He had $15,499 in his campaign account when this election cycle started and has raised $10,775 so far this year, for a total of $26,274. Wilkins has spent $4,641 and has $21,633 in his campaign account. There are two other candidates in the ra ce, Tanner Lucas and Sal Leone. Both have fi led threshold statements that they wouldn’t raise or spend more than $1,000, which pretty much eliminates any chance they have of being successful candidates in this race. Leone is a perennial candidate and one thing you can say about him is that he never gives up. DISTRICT 5 City Council You are invited to a fundraising reception for TONY WILKINS Greensboro City Council District 5 Darryl’s 3300 Gate City Blvd. Tuesday, Sept. 26th • 6:00 to 8:00 PM $50 donation per ticket Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, beverages, and a chance to win the CASH Grand Prize! RSVP to tony@tonywilkins.com or call (336) 339-0296 or donate online at tonywilkins.com/support.html Paid for by the Committee to Elect Tony Wilkins

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    8 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Guilford and High Point Take Swings At One Another Over Funding Baseball Stadium by Scott D. Yost High Point officials call Guilford County’s coming decision whether or not to participate in a new downtown baseball stadium project a “no brainer,” but, in the days leading up to the Board of Commissioners Thursday, Sept. 7 meeting, the commissioners have been wrangling over whether they should evean hold a public hearing on the matter. The contentious $45 million project calls for a $30 million stadium with additional land acquisition and other costs totaling $15 million, financed by the city through a bank loan. One criticism leveled against the project has been that the High Point leaders didn’t seek voter approval from city residents through a bond referendum to finance the cost instead. There’s been plenty of heated rhetoric from both sides in recent weeks and the project has polarized advocates and opponents. The discussions, both private and public, have become very tense at times. High Point plans to build the downtown stadium with expectations that private sector developers will follow with multiple projects, but some commissioners question whether that development will come. If it doesn’t, they say, the project will be a $45 million albatross around the necks of High Point citizens. High Point has asked Guilford County to enter into an interlocal revenue sharing agreement that, over the next 20 years, would direct about $11.1 million in future tax revenue from Guilford County toward repayment of the $45 million loan. High Point wants to use that county funding – along with other revenue streams such as parking surcharges, stadium naming rights and High Point’s added property tax revenue from the anticipated growth – to pay back the loan. High Point leaders point out every chance they get that, since Guilford County would only dedicate money from future growth in a 650-acre “stadium influence area,” the county won’t be out a dime if the project is a flop. One concern Guilford County commissioners have is that the area – a little more than one square mile – is a large slice of downtown High Point on which the county would be giving up revenue from future growth for perhaps two decades. If High Point had a nickel for every argument, debate and conversation about the downtown stadium proposal in the last three weeks, the city would likely have plenty of money to fund the whole thing out of pocket. However, as it is, city leaders say they need Guilford County’s help to make the financial ends meet. The project has at least one strong advocate on the Board of Commissioners: District 1 Commissioner Carlvena Foster, who represents much of High Point. Foster said the project has been all consuming in recent weeks. “I’ve been in conversation with everybody in High Point every day, all day – it’s really been consuming my life here,” she said. “So I’d really like to get past this.” To give one illustration of the heated and intense activity surrounding the project, on Tuesday, August 29, there was a conference call between High Point staff and Guilford County staff early in the morning, followed by a meeting of four commissioners and Guilford County’s legal, finance and management There’s pulling out all the stops and then there’s pulling out all the stops. That second one – the one with italics – is exactly what master showman and High Point University President Nido Qubein did on Wednesday evening, Sept. 6 at the Hayworth Fine Arts Center on his school’s campus. The presentation – meant to support a proposed downtown stadium and related economic development in High Point’s downtown – started with a university choral group singing the Star-Spangled Banner in front of a giant image of an American flag and the event grew in momentum from there. It included a host of speakers in rapid succession, such as former Greensboro Mayor Jim Melvin – a driving force behind Greensboro’s minor league stadium – and Bob Maricich, the chairman and CEO of International Market Centers, who flew in from Las team, where the group talked about the matter extensively for the remainder of the morning. (More commissioners wanted to attend that meeting but they were told their attendance would make it (continued on next page) High Point Holds Star-Spangled Baseball Stadium Rally by Scott D. Yost Photo by Scott D. Yost Vegas to tell the crowd how a revitalized downtown could keep furniture market attendees coming back to High Point’s well known market. Qubein used the impressive event to demonstrate his commitment to the proposed new $30 million stadium in downtown High Point, as well as to give the 900 people in the packed house a progress report on the economic development projects that will be centered around the proposed ballpark. City leaders hope the project will bring in $100 million in investment to a section of downtown High Point that’s been largely desolate for the past decade. At the event, Qubein, an internationally known motivational speaker, attempted to address all of the concerns critics have leveled against the project. He made announcements, one after another, filled with new revelations that drew applause from the (continued on next page)

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    Page 9

    swings (continued from previous page) an illegal meeting.) That afternoon, four county commissioners met with High Point University President Nido Qubein, a major backer of the stadium, and then, well into Tuesday night, there were a host of commissioner conversations held by phone and by text. Foster said she thinks this project will be a terrific success in her city and that she may have a deeper understanding of it than some of the commissioners who oppose the county’s participation. She said that might come from having been in more meetings on it since she represents High Point. She said that rally (continued from previous page) crowd filled with High Point leaders, High Point University officials and others from that city. The crowd also had a large number of high profile citizens from outside High Point, such as former Greensboro Mayor Robbie Perkins, former Guilford County Commissioner Linda Shaw and Downtown Greensboro Inc. President Zack Matheny. Qubein announced that the naming rights of the stadium had been sold to BB&T Bank and he also revealed the baseball team that’s moving to High Point to start play in 2019, subject to the stadium being built. Earlier this year Qubein had pledged to raise $38 million in private money to go toward downtown economic development related to the project, including a proposed children’s museum. Qubein announced at the Sept. 6 event, to loud applause, that he had in fact exceeded that goal: He reported that $50 million had been raised. One developer spoke of his company’s intentions to build an apartment complex of at least 200 units, and a representative of Carroll Companies, which owns the Rhino Times, spoke on that company’s intentions to build a hotel as part of the development. Qubein said all that news should allay fears of people who question whether this project is a good idea. “Somebody said, ‘We’ll never bring economic development like, maybe, a hotel’ – so now we got one – and somebody said, ‘Well gosh, we gotta have some apartments, and we got at least 200 of them – and it appears we have a team,” Qubein said. Though the Fine Arts Center was could be one reason she’s so prostadium while others aren’t. “I don’t want to say I’m getting different information, but I think I’m getting more information,” she said. Foster also said the opposition that some commissioners have been hearing from High Point citizens is louder than it is widespread. “There are probably 10 people I’ve heard from who are against the stadium concept,” Foster said, adding that the majority of constituents she’s talked to are proponents. “The leaders in High Point, of course, are for it,” she added. filled with about 900 people, in some respects the entire presentation was directed at nine people: the Guilford County commissioners. City of High Point officials have asked Guilford County to enter into a revenue sharing plan that will use most of the additional tax revenue – expected from increase in property values around the stadium – to help pay off the debt from the stadium. That would mean Guilford County would pay about $11.1 million over the next two decades toward the cost of that stadium. The commissioners have expressed concerns about the project – many of which Qubein attempted to address. Qubein said that the county’s part of the financing is a crucial component of the plan, and he said that, without a stadium, there would be “no central destination point” for the development to materialize around. He said High Point, Guilford County and other partners need to work together to make the stadium a reality. “Commissioners, I say this lovingly ,” he said. “I know you have a very tough job – if you don’t vote for this project, we can’t do it” and he added that, if they didn’t back it, that would result in “$100 million flushed down the commode.” The half dozen commissioners who were at the event seemed impressed, though several commissioners who had questions and concerns still said they had questions and concerns afterward. High Point Mayor Bill Bencini called the event “phenomenal” and said that, in his mind, after that presentation, there wasn’t much left for critics of the project to object to. www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 9 Other commissioners are solidly in the middle. Guilford County Commissioner Skip Alston said he isn’t ready to vote for or against county funding for the stadium yet because he’s still gathering facts and he wants to hear more public input. At the Board of Commissioners Sept. 7 meeting, the commissioners will discuss, and then vote, whether or not to hold a public hearing on the project. If they decide to hear from the public, the hearing is likely to be scheduled for the board’s next meeting on Thursday, Sept. 21. Alston said he’s trying to find reasons to support the project. “I told Nido Qubein and [High Point Mayor] Bill Bencini that I’m 50/50,” he said. “I want to get there, but I can’t get there because of the public outcry and because I need more information.” Alston also said recently that the discussion has been rushed and tense and that High Point leaders need to “give us some time and exhale a little bit.” Alston said he understands the city officials’ desire to move forward quickly, but it’s not a good idea to demand that commissioners make up their minds before they have the information they need. “Be careful what you ask for,” Alston told Foster recently when she was asking fellow commissioners in a meeting to go ahead and put the funding request on the agenda for the commissioners’ Sept. 7 meeting. Alston added that he would prefer it if the High Point City Council was making the request to Guilford County – rather than Bencini making the request with no vote by the council. The High Point City Council voted in favor of the baseball project earlier this year but hasn’t held a specific vote to request the future funding from the county. Alston said that, though the issue has been very contentious in recent days, he certainly hopes the commissioners will at least approve a public hearing to get a better understanding of the facts and a sense of public opinion. “What harm would it be to hear from the public?” Alston said. Other commissioners argue that, if it turns out that the Board of Commissioners is solidly against using county tax dollars to fund the project, it would be a waste of everyone’s time to hold a hearing. Regardless, High Point officials want more than a public hearing – they want to see (continued on page 39) SAVVY SOCIAL SECURITY PLANNING What You Need to Know to Help Maximize Retirement Income Don’t Miss This VALUABLE WORKSHOP Presented by Jack Dubel, CFP ® , AIF ® Financial Advisor/Investment Managament Consultant YOU • When should I apply for Social Security? WANT • How much can I expect to receive? TO KNOW • How can I maximize my benefits? The decisions you make today can have a tremendous impact on the total amount of benefi ts you stand to receive over your lifetime. YOU CAN LEARN... • 5 factors to consider when applying for benefits • When it makes sense to delay benefits - and when it does not • 2 innovative strategies for coordinating benefits with your spouse • How to take advantage of survivor benefits, divorce spouse benefi ts and even divorce-spouse survivor benefits • What you MUST consider before remarrying SEPT 27 | 11:30AM - 1:00PM (Lunch Included) Choose one of the following dates SEPT 28 | 5:45PM - 7:15PM (Light Refreshments Included) Greensboro Public Library 219 N. Church St., Greensboro, NC 27401, Tannenbaum Sternberger, Room A RSVP:jack.dubel@raymondjames.com RAYMOND JAMES FINANCIAL SERVICES INC. 108 State Street, Suite 110, Greensboro, NC 27408 | T: 336.907.2600 www.dubelwealthdesign.com Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services Inc. member FINRA/SIPC. ©2017 Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. member FINRA/SIPC. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certificate marks CFP ® . 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    10 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, September 7, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com State of Community Better Than People Think by Scott D. Yost Clearly the Greensboro community has some image problems right now – and, for once, the 2017 State of Our Community Luncheon acknowledged those issues, and the presenters and audience members alike were able to laugh about the city’s somewhat blah reputation. Thanks to that tack, the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce’s annual State of Our Community Luncheon, held on Wednesday, August 30 in the Koury Convention Center at the Sheraton Greensboro Hotel at Four Seasons, was a lot more upbeat, enjoyable and at times even downright funny, than many of the stuffy and stodgy affairs of past years. The Greensboro Chamber of Commerce, previously known as the Greensboro Partnership, and its economic development partners hold the event each August as a sort of pep rally for the business community. About 850 people – business leaders, political leaders and other area movers and shakers – attended the event as they do each year in August. Over the years, the format of the luncheon has changed many times. Sometimes, for instance, the audience hears from political leaders making a measured, cautious speech that includes nothing controversial, or from other speakers who give out facts and numbers like he or she is giving an internal corporate project proposal. However, the 2017 instantiation of the event was very upbeat and entertaining and it benefited tremendously from the speakers’ acknowledgment that Greensboro does have some big image problems. The first step to solving a problem is acknowledging that the problem exists. Also, of course, the lunch was a chance for community leaders to talk about what’s going right with Greensboro and Guilford County. Guilford County Chamber of Commerce President Brent Christensen was in rare form when he addressed, head on, some of the negativism that’s sometimes found in Greensboro and in Guilford County. He said Greensboro needed to get its mojo back and “Spread the swagger.” “Now, here is not how to spread the swagger,” Christensen said. He said his son came home the other day and said, “Dad, I found this great shirt in downtown Greensboro. It’s great. It’s really funny.’” “The shop will remain nameless, so that the guilty are not punished,” Christensen said as he held up the T-shirt. “It says, ‘Greensboro – Not so bad after all,’” he read. “That’s what we’re selling in downtown Greensboro!” he added. He noted that the vendor was a chamber member no less. “That’s not swagger. No. So I bought ‘em all.” That last comment line received loud applause. Christensen said his teenage son’s reaction to the “Spread the Swagger,” theme was, “Oh jeez, Dad, come on …” However, the receptive and easy crowd at the State of Our Community seemed to enjoy the message a lot. “We need to find the swagger and spread the swagger,” he said. In that same vein, Christensen recognized Jake Keys, the City of Greensboro’s communications manager who won instant national fame in March after Jim Boeheim – who Christensen called “that jerky coach from Syracuse” – said in a press conference that there was no reason for the ACC Tournament to be played in Greensboro. (“There’s no value in playing in Greensboro – none,” Boeheim had said, along with several other mean remarks about the city.) In response, Keys tweeted, “We kindly disagree. But I guess you can lose in the 1st round anywhere. At least it’s a quick ride home.” That tweet didn’t sit will with the Orangemen basketball team, which had gone home from the ACC Tournament in the first round in backto-back years, but the tweet did garner Greensboro some great publicity. Christensen called Keys “the defender of swagger.” He said Boeheim had taken a shot a Greensboro and Keys had “rocked the twittersphere” with “the greatest snarky comment I’ve ever seen.” He added, “It made headlines; it made T-shirts – it made for a great opportunity for Greensboro to talk about all we have to offer.” According to Christensen, that kind of defense of the community was something Greensboro needs more of. “Show ‘em with a T-shirt; show ‘em with a tweet,” Christensen said. “Show ‘em with a YouTube video.” He said that, when area citizens meet with someone from out of town, or attend a conference in another part of the country, they should talk up Greensboro; they should “Make Greensboro proud.” Other presenters at the luncheon often had the same message: Greensboro has a lot going for it, but it has some image problems as well. One spoke of how his spouse was reluctant to move to Greensboro and another pointed out that the city is often confused with Greenville, South Carolina. The 2017 State of Our Community accomplished something that perhaps no previous State of Our Community has done – it ended on time. The schedule called for the event to wrap up at 1:30 p.m., which is exactly when it did end. In recent years especially the luncheon has often gone way over and speakers have given their talks while audience members were streaming in droves out of the large ballroom. But this year everyone stayed to the end – both because the event didn’t run long and because the speakers were entertaining. At the luncheon, Action Greensboro Executive Director Cecelia Thompson spoke on the importance of “attracting and retaining the next generation of leadership.” Thompson, who moved to this area to attend Elon, said she was the product of a great internship program and those programs should be encouraged at area schools and businesses. “We need all of you in the room to really think about mentorship,” Thompson said. “Have you connected to a young person recently, whether it’s through your office, or your neighborhood or your place of worship?” One of the liveliest presentations was from Ursula Dudley Oglesby, the president of Dudley Beauty Corp. – a successful company that her parents began. Oglesby, who grew up in Greensboro, is a Harvard Law School graduate who returned to this area (continued on next page)

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