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Business London Magazine | August 2017
Magazines | 2017-07-27 09:50:12
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    New look, New content business London Minimum wage increase: Is $15 too much? Could you have founder’s syndrome? brew’s on! Meet London’s craftiest beer makers august 2017 $2.95 PM40064683 businesslondon.ca Kombucha beer is on its way! Psst.... there’s a new brewery coming to town

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    A Daimler Brand The coupe that’s also an SUV. The SUV that’s also a coupe. The new GLC Coupe. Make the best of every ground. This is what happens when ability meets style. A fastback inspired roofline dives into a sculpted tail section that is as captivating as it is capable, featuring the largest storage volume in its class. mercedes-benz.ca/glc-coupe © 2017 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. Mercedes-Benz London I 35 Southdale Road East I 866-879-0768 I info@mblondon.com

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    Find a place where the grass is greener. Wake up to pristine green fairways that colour the view from your bedroom windows. Tee off early, grab a bite with new friends, and do it all again tomorrow. Welcome to the RiverBend life. Award-winning one floor homes from the mid $300s. • Private Gated Community • 18 hole Championship Golf Course • Active Clubhouse Purchase one of the first 20 inside lots and ENJOY $5,000 in FREE upgrades plus ONE YEAR FREE land lease! 519.657.4333 RiverBendGolf.com

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    OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE — AUGUST 2017 www.londonchamber.com This year Canadians across the country celebrated Canada’s sesquicentennial. But 2017 is important for another reason to the London Chamber of Commerce. It is the year we are celebrating our 160th anniversary. On April 22, 1857, 44 of London’s London Board of Trade changed its name 6 served in their turn as Mayor of the prominent business, civic and political to the London Chamber of Commerce. Municipality leaders gathered at the old Mechanic’s It is significant to note that many of 17 served as municipal councilors Institute to establish the London Board the early Chamber presidents were 4 become members of parliament of Trade (LBOT). community icons and that many of our 5 were anointed members of the Notable London business men including John Kinder Labatt, Lionel Ridout names. This underscores their contribu- 2 were made Privy Councilors streets and buildings now carry their Canadian senate and Sir John Carling. With a membership fee of one pound, the LBOT set a marks their place in London’s ongoing 2 served as Members of Dominion tion to the economy of London and 2 were knighted mandate to avoid government funding history. Cabinets and rely on financial and moral support 1 of these 2 served in five Canadian from its members. Of the 44 founders: Cabinets In 1918, following World War I, the 4 were school trustees One hundred and sixty years after its founding, the London Chamber of Commerce remains as relevant as ever. It is the premier networking organization for business in London, holding monthly Business After Five meetings which typically have 100-300 attendees, not to mention its signature events including the State of the City Address and London Business Achievement Awards, both drawing in attendances of more than 1200. As part of a network of over 450 chambers of commerce and boards of trade, we are committed to ensuring business can compete and win in domestic and global markets. Included in our recent advocacy work is: • The advocacy efforts of the chamber network will help small businesses benefit from $2.7 billion in tax savings through 2020 due to the small business 42 | businesslondon.ca | august 2017 tax rate being reduced to 9% from 11% would limit investment opportunities for • The London Chamber of Commerce the majority of Ontarians. along with the Ontario Chamber of • In 2016, the federal government was Commerce is part of a coalition of pondering taxing employee health benefits. The Chamber network along with Ontario’s leading industry and sector associations that recently sent an open other stakeholders launched a successful letter to Premier Kathleen Wynne urging campaign against the tax. the Government of Ontario to slow down • WSIB has long been a concern of the the implementation of Bill 148 (The Fair London Chamber – in particular, the Workplaces, Better Jobs Act) as there is unfunded liability – which was part of serious concern that the pace of this legislation will injure our economic growth. what prompted the Chamber to write a policy paper in 2015 and to hold meetings with the President of WSIB in 2016 • In May of this year, the London Chamber of Commerce drafted a letter and 2017. In recent years, this unfunded to Finance Minister Sousa (which was liability has dropped significantly from later adopted and sent by the Ontario a massive $14.2B in 2011 to its current Chamber of Commerce) in opposition to level of $5.6B. This year employers province wide, will see an average decrease a proposal by the Canadian and Ontario Securities Commissions that would ban in premiums of 5% - the first premium embedded commissions as doing so decrease in over 15 years. inside inside 23 16 18 Im-Press-ive Growth Pulp & Press Juice has sold 1,000,000 bottles and still growing Karen Chalmers On the fast paced nature of the gaming industry Doughnuts anyone? Rhino Lounge is 16 innovating doughnuts August 2017 Volume 18: Issue 10 business London Publisher: Lisa Catania lcatania@postmedia.com 519.667.5480 Managing Editor: Lisa Bucher lbucher@postmedia.com 519.471.2907 x 540281 Sales Manager: Linda Leblanc lleblanc@postmedia.com 519.673.5005 x 516200 Ilinka Armstrong: Media sales consultant iarmstrong@postmedia.com 519.673.5005 x 540255 Design/Production susan Batsford sbatsford@postmedia.com 23 18 Im-Press-ive Growth Pulp & Press Juice has sold 1,000,000 bottles and still growing Karen Chalmers On the fast paced nature of the gaming industry Business London is published monthly at 369 York st., London, ON N6a 4g1 Doughnuts a Rhino Lo innovatin 26 cover story It’a all about beer London has four thriving craft breweries. All have opened in the last five year and all are locally owned. Aaron Lawrence (London Brewing Co-op), Mike Smith (Toboggan Brewing Company), Dave Reed (Forked River), Gavin Anderson (Anderson Craft Ales), Paul Corriveau (Railway City Brewing) and Michael Naish (Storm Stayed Brewing) 14 Emerging millennials They are jumping on the small brand bandwagon 19 Matter More Marketing strategy and other stuff worth doing 20 The Business of Style The many hats of Jim Telfer 36 Fanshawe College Going beyond physical inclusion 26 4 | businesslondon.ca | august 2017 The Voice London Chamber of Commerce then... ...and now . . . of Business The Voice of Business for 160 Years Annual Meeting The London Chamber of Commerce’s 160th Annual General Meeting wi l be held on September 28th 2017 and is open to a l members of the London Chamber of Commerce. 42 The Voice of business 168 12,000 copies distributed to businesses in the London/st. thomas area, including members of the London Chamber of Commerce. subscriptions: $24 for one year, $37.50 for two, $45 for three (gst included). usa $60 per year (Canadian funds). Reproduction in whole or in part of the editorial or advertising content is forbidden without the written consent of the publisher. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064683 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Business London 369 York st., London, ON N6a 4g1 ISSN 1493-0579 168 Aaron Lawrence (London Brewing Co-op), Mike Brewing Company), SUBSCRIBEDave TODAY. Reed (Forked River), LFPRESS.COM Builtontrust. (Anderson Craft Ales), Paul Corriveau (Railway and Michael Naish (Storm Stayed Brewing)

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    THE OFFICE OF THE FUTURE IS HERE. Say hello to an innovative work environment powered by the sun. Welcome to West 5, a SMART, active community surrounded by nature. design and technology enhance how you work and how you think about Where at every turn, you can feel the future. Feel the Energy. Net Zero building Vibrant outdoor spaces Surrounded by retail, restaurants and activity Automated lighting, heating & cooling Free parking Lease your space today. West5.ca

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    business New look. New content. New people. LISA BUCHER, MANAGING EDITOR, BUSINESS LONDON LONDON Here I am, the new girl in town, joining the Business London team. We have added a number of new face to our magazine. As I take over the role of managing editor, Ilinka Armstrong joins the team as our new media sales consultant and Susan Batsford takes on the role of design and graphics editor. In fact, we are now a publication run entirely by women. How many business magazines can say that? What have we been up to at Business London? - ate journalists, photographers and experts. We have some new content, a new look and some new social media. Look for us on facebook, twitter to participate in some cool contests. Now it’s your turn! Questions? Comments? Suggestions? We want to hear your thoughts. From left to right: Ilinka Armstrong, Media Sales Consultant Lisa Catania, Publisher, Business London; Regional Director Media Sales Lisa Bucher, Managing Editor, Business London Linda Leblanc, Media Sales Manager Susan Batsford, Design and Graphics Editor PHOTO: GEOFF ROBINS 6 | businesslondon.ca | AUGUST 2017

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    where comfort and stylemeet 752 Wharncliffe Rd. S., London 519-681-2200 livinstylefurniture.com

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    Marilyn Sinclair GettinG Started The ups and downs of getting going in business Rich or king? how founder’s syndrome can affect a company’s success and when it might be time to step aside. From the spark oF an idea to the first days of a startup, the first sale and the first hire, it’s the passion, commitment and loving care of a founder that takes an idea from a rough sketch on the back of a napkin to a successful market contender. much of that success comes making sure that the business has absolutely everything it needs to thrive. it means forgoing sleep, vacations and sometimes, a salary. all in pursuit of a single purpose. startup success. and it’s something only a founder or founding team can truly understand and bring to life. no wonder so many founders have trouble letting go. most entrepreneurs approach a business with the mindset that they are the only ones that can effectively lead the organization to success – and that’s entirely true in the early days. But long-term, this passion can sometimes create a blind spot that interferes with the organization’s potential. a study completed by noam Wasserman, a professor of clinical entrepreneurship at University of southern California and former associate professor of business administration at the harvard Business school, found that four out of five founders were forced to step down from their Ceo role, much to their surprise.1 if you’re an entrepreneur with an early stage company, that’s a troubling stat. here are few things to watch for and 8 | businesslondon.ca | AuguST 2017 consider if you think you may have “Founder’s syndrome”. Cultural evolution is a necessity. a startup’s culture is often a direct extension of its founder. it makes sense. The founding vision determines the business structure, management style, hiring and brand experience and so on. a founding team is naturally deeply invested in the original vision, mission and values of their organization and are modelling the kind of leadership and management practices that served the original framework. But when the strategy necessitates a massive cultural shift, it’s naturally going to be difficult for those original vision holders to lead the change. Loyalty can be an increasing obstacle. With company growth comes the need for new, different and specialized skillsets. Founding leaders may quickly find themselves managing in areas they have little to no experience. at a certain point, loyalty can become a fault. That includes loyalty to early employees, even when performance or alignment just isn’t present. it includes loyalty to the early practices that first spurred success, regardless of their current effectiveness. Loyalty can inhibit a founder’s ability to see the whole picture clearly and understand when it is time to pivot and head in a new, more profitable or more stable direction. and that’s a huge risk to business viability. There are limits to expertise and interest. With growth, comes the need for new product development, enhanced marketing strategy, formal company structure, official hr policies and new level of administration. at this point, founders should look into the mirror and honestly assess their intellectual, emotional and management limitations. Founders are typically starters and builders (versus maintainers) and that’s why it’s crucial for an entrepreneur to understand their motivations, aka, why they got into this business in the first place. as a startup takes off, leaders are often faced with a general conundrum referred to by harvard Business review as “rich or king”. That is, do they want to be in charge more than they want the company to maximize its potential value? With the exception of founders and Ceos like Bill Gates, very few entrepreneurs achieve this balance. Ultimately, each founder must come to his or her own conclusion regarding what he or she wants to accomplish as a leader and what he or she can accomplish. There is no right or wrong answer. But it is founders who understand their personal motivations – whether wealth, control or changing the world – who will have the greatest chance at success. Marilyn Sinclair is president & CEO of TechAlliance, the regional innovation centre for London and Southwestern Ontario.

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    AD{TS5400542} LEGAL MOMENT Realities of rent control 1. Landlordscan increase rent amaximum of onetime peryearbythe government guideline. 2. TheProvinceofOntario determines themaximum annual percentage by whichrents canbeincreased. 3. Themaximum guidelineincreaseis2.5%. Currently it is setat1.5%. 4. Foreligible capital costexpenditures(e.g.,new roof, newfurnace, etc.) landlordscan increase rentsbya maximum of 9%, spread over threeyears,withalimit of 3% peryear. ABOUTPAUL •BorninLondonand attended BrockUniversity •First paralegalinOntario to become partnerina law firm (2011) •Married with twochildren •Formercompetitive swimmer •ServesasaSeniorOfficial with theLondon AquaticClub Paul Cappa Paul practisesinthe firm’s administrative lawgroup with an emphasis on representingproperty owners in connection with residential tenancies law, municipal planningand zoning, andmunicipal property assessment appeals. London Kitchener Sarnia Chatham 519-672-9330 226-476-4444 519-344-2020 226-494-1034 www.CohenHighley.com

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    Kombucha beer is on its way! This husband and wife team are brewing up a new beverage It all started with a home brew; a kombucha home brew. Booch Organic Kombucha may have started in 2015 but its roots go back much farther. shannon slade, half of the husband and wife team that founded Booch, started making the fermented tea beverage at home in 2012 to help with her celiac disease. Her husband shawn, a holistic lifestyle coach at the time, started suggesting kombucha to his clients. He would even help them out by sharing some of his and his wife’s stash. That’s when the business took off. Booch uses natural, organic ingredients in its kombucha. This is important to both shawn and shannon, who do their best to source local ingredients. regardless of the source, they always opt for organic. since officially launching, Booch has opened a retail store at 1010 dundas st. in london, moved production to a separate plant on Clark road and expanded its reach to 200 plus stores across Ontario. according to shawn, Booch’s quick success was unexpected. In less than two years the company grew from 2,200 sq.ft. to 9,000 sq.ft. Now they’re looking at a new venture; beer. “When we started increasing production of our kombucha we were using a 10 | businesslondon.ca | august 2017 lot of the same equipment as the breweries in the area,” said shawn. “We became friends with a lot of these brewers and started looking at the possibilities.” last summer, Booch teamed up with last Castle Brewing Co. in Port stanley, Ont. to create its first kombucha beer flavoured with strawberry, chamomile and wild rose. It received high praise from drinkers and the success of this experiment led to further development of a kombucha beer. While the flagship beer would not be gluten free like its other kombucha products, shawn and shannon will approach the making of its beer the same way they approach its other products. according to shawn, “It was a natural progression” given the couples interest in many fermented foods and beverages. Both husband and wife like to test and innovate but while shannon is more about the kombucha, shawn is very excited to explore the prospect of wild fermented beer. “It’s always been a passion of mine,” he said. Booch is ready to release its flagship very soon. When asked what his ultimate goals were for the beer, he said it was more about the community than anything else. “[We hope to] further connect with the community and create new and delicious craft beverages.” The beer will eventually be brewed out of their Clarke road production warehouse and will be available locally. Currently, they are setting up a new bottling line that will be used for all of its bottled beverages. While demand has kept both husband and wife busy, they have stayed true to their small business ideals. They have a staff of 12 people and take care of much of the day-to-day operations themselves. When asked what it was like working with shannon he said; “We are learning to set boundaries.” He went on to state that while they work together, this is shannon’s passion project and at the end of the day, he respects her decisions. Just as much as it can be challenging, shawn says it’s great helping run Booch; “ It’s fun because the business is kind of an extension of who we are as a couple. We very much care about local organic food. We care about shopping at our local farmer’s market … We think that corporations these days have a responsibility to do some social good.” so far, Booch Organic Kombucha is just “going with the flow” of their success, but they plan to continue innovating new products for the enjoyment of their fans for a long time. by Ashley Idle Shannon and Shawn Slade

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