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Rhino Times - 2017-03-09
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-03-09 00:00:00
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    Vol. V No. 10 Greensboro, North Carolina www.rhinotimes.com Thursday, March 9, 2017 plus Under The Hammer, Uncle Orson Reviews Everything AND MORE

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    2 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com The Weekly Hammer THE WEEKLY Hammer Jordan Lake Rules Resolution Behind the Curtain by John Hammer Tuesday, March 7, the Greensboro City Council passed a resolution reaffirming the city’s longstanding opposition to the Jordan Lake Rules. But It was a long, tortuous path to arrive at that version of the resolution. According to the story being floated by city hall, it was originally written to thank state Sen. Trudy Wade for her work in delaying the implementation of the Jordan Lake Rules. However, the original resolution proposed at the Feb. 21 City Council meeting, which did thank Wade, also supported the implementation of the Jordan Lake Rules as they are currently written. The resolution that passed on March 7 didn’t mention Wade, which seems somewhat odd since two weeks ago, when the resolution was initially introduced, the stated purpose was to thank Wade – and supposedly the bulk of the resolution in support of the Jordan Lake Rules was simply an afterthought. So how does a resolution thanking Wade and in support of the Jordan Lake Rules become a resolution that doesn’t mention Wade and opposes the Jordan Lake Rules? Well, that’s politics. Two weeks ago, that version of what we are supposed to believe was essentially the same resolution – except that it stated the opposite of what this one did – came within one councilmember of being adopted by the City Council. That one councilmember was Tony Wilkins, the lone Republican on the City Council. Wilkins thought the last minute resolution – which he and the rest of the City Council, but not the public, received hours before the Feb. 21 City Council meeting – looked a little fishy. Wilkins sent the proposed resolution to former City Councilmember Tom Phillips, a longtime member of the Piedmont Triad Regional Water Authority, and Wade. The response Wilkins received from both was there is no way you can allow that resolution to pass. The resolution then rapidly made the rounds of the development community in Greensboro and the opposition was overwhelming. At the Feb. 21 meeting, Councilmember Mike Barber said that the resolution had some problems in wording and needed to be withdrawn. “Problems in wording” in this case meant the resolution says the exact opposite of what the city supports. The cover story for the Jordan Lake Rules resolution is that Mayor Nancy Vaughan, on the morning of (continued on page 14) RHINO TIMES BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY For information to advertise in our Directory call (336) 763-4170

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 3 table of CONTENTS 2 WEEKLY HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 6 SAY YES MAY HAVE TO SAY NO BY SCOTT D. YOST 8 COUNTY SAYS SOME ANIMAL SHELTER NEWS IS FAKE NEWS BY SCOTT D. YOST 10 COUNCIL VIOLATES OWN POLICY, POKES LEGISLATURE IN THE EYE BY JOHN HAMMER 12 WHAT DID CITY COUNCILMEMBERS DO TO DESERVE ZONING 101? BY JOHN HAMMER 15 UNCLE ORSON BY ORSON SCOTT CARD 17 REAL ESTATE 23 YOST COLUMN BY SCOTT D. YOST 25 STREET LEVEL 4 RHINO SHORTS 18 NYT CROSSWORD 19 CHILDREN’S SCHEDULE 21 THE SOUND OF THE BEEP 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS 28 NEWS OF THE WEIRD 29 SUDOKU Cover by Anthony Council 35 UNDER THE HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 30 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Peripheral Neuropathy WARNING! Greensboro, NC – The most common method your doctor will recommend to treat your neuropathy is with prescription drugs that may temporarily reduce your symptoms. These drugs have names such as Gabapentin, Lyrica, Cymbalta, and Neurontin, and are primarily antidepressant or anti-seizure drugs. These drugs may cause you to feel uncomfortable and have a variety of harmful side effects. Figure 1: Notice the very small blood vessels surrounding each nerve. Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems. This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which causes the nerves to begin to degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow. As you can see in Figure 2, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not get the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms. In order to effectively treat your neuropathy three factors must be determined. 1) What is the underlying cause? 2) How Much Nerve Damage Has Been Sustained. NOTE: Once you have sustained 85% nerve loss, there is likely nothing that we can do for you. 3) How much treatment will your condition require? The treatment that is provided at Advance Wellness has three main goals: 1) Increase blood flow 2) Stimulate small fiber nerves 3) Decrease brain-based pain The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes a specialized low level light therapy using light emitting diode technology. This technology was originally developed by NASA to assist in increasing blood flow. The low level light therapy is like watering a plant. The light therapy will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a plant and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper. Figure 3: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John Hammer managing editor ELAINE HAMMER county editor SCOTT D. YOST contributing editor ORSON SCOTT CARD PUBLISHER Roy Carroll GENERAL MANAGER Joann Zollo creative director ANTHONY COUNCIL advertising consultants DONNA GOODWIN TYE SINGLETON 216 West Market Street, Greensboro NC 27401 P.O. Box 9023, Greensboro NC 27429 | (336) 763-4170 (336) 763-2585 fax | sales@rhinotimes.com | www.rhinotimes.com Figure 2: When these very small blood vessels become diseased they begin to shrivel up and the nerves begin to degenerate. The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here that offers you hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. To learn more, attend the Peripheral Neuropathy Workshop. Details below. Have You Been Told You Have To “LIVE WITH THE PAIN?” Neuropathy Workshop Sat., March 18 th 1:30 p.m. 515 College Road #11 Greensboro, NC 27410 FREE!! Refreshments provided. Call: (336) 316-0827 Call NOW! Seating is limited. Dr. Joe Draper, III, DC Advance Wellness is located near Guilford College.

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    4 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com RHINO SHORTS by John Hammer Editor The Rhino Times Dailylight Saving Time Schmoozefest is Thursday, March 23 at Fresh. Local. Good. at 433 Spring Garden St. This is in the Morehead Foundry, the first multiplex dining facility in Greensboro. Beer, wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served gratis to those who sign in and wear a name tag. The subhead on the News & Record editorial page caused me to do a double take. I immediately thought that someone had broken into the office and was holding Editorial Page Editor Allen Johnson. Under the headline, “Find out the truth,” the subhead reads, “Either president Obama committed a crime or President Trump made a false accusation. We deserve to know which.” I ignored the fact that Obama is not the president, and was struck by the idea that someone at the News & Record was entertaining the possibility that Obama broke the law and that Trump could be right about something. Then I read the editorial. Most of the editorial is about how horrible and dishonest Trump is. But I read it all the way to the end where I found the brief admission that it was possible that Obama did something wrong while he was president, so the headline accomplished its task: It caused me to read the entire editorial. The Greensboro economic development team is always talking about how Greensboro should be looking at cities that have had a lot of economic development success like Greenville, South Carolina, Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Columbus, Ohio, but maybe they should concentrate closer to home. Mebane, right down the road in Alamance County, has doubled in size since 2001. Maybe Greensboro should figure out why businesses prefer Mebane over Greensboro, and if they can solve that one, then they can move on to competing with Greenville, Chattanooga and Columbus. Most corrections to the minutes of a meeting are pretty mundane, just like the minutes, but Councilmember Tony Wilkins asked for a correction to the minutes of the Feb.7 Greensboro City Council meeting that is not in that category. The uncorrected minutes read that Wilkins “referenced the prospect of getting $600,000 in funding to put a Donut Hole on Hilltop Road.” A $600,000 donut hole would be a whale of a big donut hole. Wilkins is known for having a healthy appetite, but with a donut hole that big even Wilkins could hardly put a dent in it. The best part is that is pretty close to what Wilkins said at the meeting. There is a portion of privately owned land nearly surrounded by the Griffin Recreation Center that is commonly referred to as the donut hole. Wilkins had the minutes corrected to indicate that he was talking about buying a piece of land, not a pastry.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 5

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    6 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Say Yes May Have To SAY NO by Scott D. Yost Say Yes to Education Guilford may soon have to start saying “no” to some students who were expecting to qualify for funding for the program that helps pay college tuition costs for students graduating from Guilford County Schools. That’s because the fi rst-year cost of the Say Yes Guilford program has turned out to be much higher than estimated – and that giant shortfall has Say Yes Guilford administrators scrambling to fi nd ways to keep the program functioning in the same manner as promised when it gained backing from the community partners who have bought into Say Yes over the past two years. Say Yes is a program that provides high school graduates with the “last dollars” needed to reach the total required payment for college tuition. In cases where students have grants or scholarships, the Say Yes money makes up any shortfall; and in cases where students have no money or scholarships available to them, Say Yes pays the entire tuition at a participating school. The program began in 1987, when George Weiss, a successful money manager, promised about 100 sixth graders in Philadelphia that he would pay their way through college if they graduated from high school. Say Yes now has programs in Buffalo and Syracuse, New York, as well as in Guilford County. The Say Yes model calls for the program to provide those last dollars to students who enroll at participating colleges – regardless of a family’s income or fi nancial status. The program has done that so far for students who entered college in the fall semester of 2016 and spring semester of 2017. However, it has become clear that doing so is costing much more than was estimated, and now, behind the scenes, Say Yes Guilford is reevaluating its model and putting all options on the table. Changes to the program could include means-testing applicants, increasing the length of time a student must be in Guilford County schools before qualifying, paying a percentage of the last dollars rather than 100 percent of those costs or limiting access to the program in other ways to bring down the quickly mounting costs. The giant shortfall in the fi rst year of the program has created a major sense of urgency among Say Yes Guilford offi cials. The same Guilford County high school graduates who entered school this year will presumably need that same last-dollar funding for the next three years and there will be more students entering the program this fall as new high school graduates take advantage of the program. One big problem with changing the model is that county businesses and community partners have donated millions based on the current model, and the Guilford County Board of Education, the Guilford County Board of Commissioners, the Greensboro City Council and others have agreed to participate based on the model in which all students have access to the program. Any changes in the program have major implications. Some families have moved to Guilford County based on the promise of Say Yes funding for college while others have held off moves until their children have graduated from high school. Some upcoming graduates are making decisions about where they will attend school in the fall based on the promise of Say Yes Guilford funding. The fact that Say Yes was presented as a service to families of all incomes was one appealing aspect of the program, since it meant it helped middle- and upper-class families as well as those who were less well off. Say Yes Guilford recently announced that Mary Vigue, the group’s executive director, had stepped down and no reason was given for the move. Also, at a recent Guilford County school board meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 28, school board members pressed Say Yes Guilford for more complete information about the number of students currently being served by the program. Say Yes Communications and Marketing Director Donnie Turlington did not shed any light on Vigue’s departure, but he said that Say Yes Guilford plans to offer more complete data to the school board and others by the end of March. “We’re still crunching and tabulating the numbers,” Turlington said of students served and the amount of money paid so far. He added that some of the spring semester costs are just now coming in. “We’ve been hesitant to give a number that’s changing,” he said. According to Turlington, Say Yes Guilford has raised $42 million in pledges and commitments and so far it has helped pay the tuition of over 2,000 students. As for providing the service to everyone regardless of income or wealth, he said that Say Yes leadership has “a desire for it to be equitable and universal.” When Turlington was asked about a potential change in the program he said, “The leadership always reserves the right to adjust the program.” Chairman of the Guilford County Board of Commissioners Jeff Philips said he was surprised recently by the news that Vigue would no longer be director. “There is some caution – obviously there’s concerns when you hear the Say Yes director depart in that way,” Phillips said. “Most of us don’t know why that took place.” Phillips said that he’s maintaining “cautious optimism as we move into the future” with regard to the program. Say Yes Guilford helps pay the tuition at colleges in the North Carolina university system, at state community colleges and at some private schools that partner with Say Yes Guilford. The program also attempts to offer support for students while they are in the Guilford County school system by partnering with groups such as mental health providers, academic support groups, nutrition programs and others in the community to help create an environment in which students can learn. Many of those support programs have not yet been established. The program currently does not pay the tuition cost of illegal aliens. There have been plans for Say Yes Guilford to cover charter schools in addition to public schools in the Guilford County system, but Turlington said that, as of yet, no charter schools have applied for the program.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 7

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    8 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com County Says Some Animal Shelter News Is Fake News by Scott D. Yost Guilford County officials and animal rights advocates are in a dogfight. And a catfight too. County officials – from Animal Shelter management all the way up to the Board of Commissioners – have been greatly frustrated by recent allegations on Facebook and elsewhere that the shelter is too quick to euthanize animals, that it does not always work well with area animal rescue groups to save animals and that shelter staff incorrectly labels animals as temperament problems and destroys them instead of giving them a proper chance for survival. Animal welfare advocates also say they’re baffled as to why the county has over $233,000 in a fund for sick and injured animals and – though it has had that money for over nine months – it still hasn’t touched the fund. This week, county commissioners, administrators and shelter officials are fighting back against claims of improper euthanasia posted on Facebook and being raised in animal welfare meetings and in the media. Both Guilford County Animal Services Director Drew Brinkley and Deputy County Manager Clarence Grier said adamantly that Guilford County Animal Services never euthanizes animals due to space considerations at the shelter – as numerous animal welfare advocates are charging. Brinkley and Grier said Guilford County destroys animals only when the animal has medical issues that can’t be addressed or when it is a temperament case – namely, when shelter workers determine the dogs and cats pose a danger to other animals or to humans. In a public statement issued last week in response to charges made on Facebook, Grier wrote that never, since Guilford County took over management of the shelter in August 2015, has the county euthanized an animal for space. Guilford County Commissioner Justin Conrad said this week that it’s very frustrating to hear all the unfounded allegations despite the fact the shelter has made such impressive progress since Guilford County government took over operations of the shelter from a scandal-plagued United Animal Coalition (UAC) – a nonprofit provider that the county had hired to run the shelter for nearly two decades. State investigators found widespread animal neglect and mistreatment at the shelter under UAC management and, just over a year and a half ago, the county took over those operations and formed the Guilford County Animal Services department. Conrad said some animal advocates have been making totally false claims on Facebook, in the media and in other public venues. He said there have been false accusations about euthanasia practices as well as unfounded claims as to the reason eight former UAC workers were fired last week. Some fired employees said the county knew they were going to fire the former UAC workers all along and just kept them on until the shelter was up and running well. They say they weren’t fired for work-related causes but were instead terminated because they once worked for the UAC. Conrad said it’s demonstrably false that Guilford County “targeted” shelter workers simply because they used to work for the UAC. He said that’s obvious from the fact that the shelter still has former UAC workers on the payroll. Conrad also said that all of the retained UAC workers were given a chance – a one-year probationary period – to see if they would work out as employees of the county-run shelter under the new administration. “At that point, individuals were given several opportunities to see whether they would fit in with the direction of the shelter,” Conrad said. Often, when employees are terminated from their jobs, they remain silent and keep their complaints to themselves. This is not one of those times. After the eight longtime employees were let go, several of them made allegations about shelter practices to the Rhino Times, the News & Record and other media outlets. Last week, four of the eight laid-off shelter employees went on Fox 8 News in a group interview to voice their complaints regarding shelter operations. Conrad said it’s explicable why those who were recently terminated from a job would have a lot to say about a former employer. “Obviously, anytime an employment separation is made, it is tough on all involved, so you understand some of the frustration,” Conrad said. “I understand that and I respect that – but I just hope that people don’t take that frustration and have a ready, fire, aim mentality toward the shelter.” The criticisms are generally not that animals are mistreated and ignored the way the UAC was found to be doing, but instead that shelter workers aren’t compassionate enough, do not walk the animals frequently, do not supply the animals with blankets to the extent that they should, don’t check to see that an animal has not spit out its medication and don’t take the time and care to properly evaluate the animals’ mental state. The key charge that county officials are attempting to refute is that the Animal Shelter is unnecessarily euthanizing animals that could be saved. After one animal welfare advocate posted charges to that effect on Facebook, Grier issued a statement. “In response to questions regarding Guilford County’s euthanization protocols,” the deputy manager wrote, “the Guilford County Animal Shelter does not, nor has it ever, while under County Management, euthanized animals due to space concerns or limitations. Rather, the euthanization of animals is a difficult decision made by our administrative, veterinary and medical professionals based on many factors including: health, extreme behavioral issues, and animals that present a danger or have been deemed dangerous to the public.” Brinkley, in an email, stated the same thing. “We do not use length of stay as a factor for euthanasia,” Brinkley wrote. “As long as an animal’s health and behavior are not concerns we will continue to seek placement (adoption, rescue) for the pet.” Grier also wrote in his statement, “Guilford County strongly encourages and advocates for animal rescue and/ or adoption of all eligible animals brought into our shelter whenever possible. Any circumstances in which an animal has to be euthanized is truly unfortunate; it is the policy of Guilford County Animal Services to hold, adopt, foster and rescue out as many animals as possible as its first priority.” Several animal welfare advocates who still interact with the shelter and therefore didn’t wish to be named, claim that Guilford County does euthanize animals for space but does so by labeling those animals as temperament cases. When the shelter gets near capacity, they say, staff becomes much more liberal as to which animals have bad dispositions, and then those additional animals are euthanized. According to the animal advocates, that means shelter workers are essentially putting down animals to create space even if they aren’t stating (continued on next page)

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 9 animal (continued from previous page) that as the official reason. Animal advocates also claim there isn’t enough of a review process before euthanizing an animal and that means a lone shelter worker having a bad day can sentence the animals to death improperly. In addition, shelter critics complain the staff also doesn’t, when evaluating an animal’s behavior, take into account things such as the fact that unneutered male dogs placed in the same cage with other males are naturally competitive. Grier and Brinkley stated that, in fact, checks are in place in the euthanasia process. “Two workers have to sign off on euthanasia,” Grier wrote in an email. Brinkley said that generally a worker on the shelter floor will call attention to behavior issues in an animal and then that first opinion will be doublechecked by a manager before an animal is killed. “The manager reviews it and agrees or disagrees – that would be the second signoff,” Brinkley said. Critics of the shelter respond that, while it may be the case that two people sign off on a euthanasia order, often only one shelter worker has truly evaluated they say and they say even that evaluation wasn’t conducted with the necessary thoroughness. The shelter is licensed to hold 300 cats and 325 dogs and Brinkley said the shelter does sometimes get full. “That can happen in the summer,” he said. But Brinkley added that the Animal Shelter never euthanizes animals because it’s at or over capacity. Brinkley also said that, when the shelter does get full, rather than destroy animals, the shelter holds adoption specials, contacts animal foster homes and works diligently with rescue groups to reduce the population. Animal welfare advocates also point out that animals at the shelter are in an agitated state when they are being held there and they may come in covered in fleas or traumatized – so of course they will snap at a worker or do something else that makes that shelter employee label it as aggressive even though that may not be the animals true disposition. Animal welfare advocates also say there have been occasions when a dog is marked as a temperament case but an animal rescue worker gets the animal and it becomes friendly – “a completely different dog” – as soon as it is out of the shelter and in a car away from those hectic conditions. Brinkley said he and his staff are very aware that animals behave differently in a shelter environment and he said he agrees that being in a shelter is difficult on the animals. He said he and other shelter workers understand it is “a stressful environment” for the dogs and cats there. “It is the environment we operate in,” Brinkley said. “I think every animal deals with that differently.” The shelter’s director added that there’s some research that shows animal temperament in a shelter isn’t highly predictive of how that animal will behave in different settings. He said many factors come into play and staff attempt to take those into account. What is the animal’s history with the previous owner? Did it attack a human or kill another animal? How is it interacting with other animals and with humans at the shelter? For medical cases, there’s a different set of questions when euthanasia is considered. Are the animals responding to treatment? Are they getting better? What kind of quality of life would the animal have after a medical procedure? Animal rescue workers have complained that Guilford County sometimes will not let them take animals even when the rescue group is willing to accept all legal liability for the animal. But Brinkley said the liability concerns the shelter has aren’t always related to legal liability. He said animal transfer can be structured in a way that protects the shelter but he added that that doesn’t relieve the shelter of its obligation to protect citizens. He said the shelter is concerned about citizen safety whether the shelter is legally liable for an animal attack or not. Brinkley added that part of the shelter’s legal responsibility is enforcing laws that protect county citizens against dangerous animals. Brinkley also said that sometimes when the shelter doesn’t hand over animals to rescue groups it is because, if an animal his adoptable, the shelter likes for that animal to be on the shelter floor for a week so that there’s a good (continued on page 14)

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    10 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 9, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Council Violates Own Policy, Pokes Legislature In The Eye by John Hammer Thank goodness. With more discussion and debate than this City Council has devoted to the budget in the past three years combined (or the recent bond referendum), the City Council finally – on Tuesday, March 7 in the Council Chambers – passed the “2017 Legislative Agenda.” This is a list of items the City Council would like the North Carolina General Assembly to pass in its 2017 session. Now the Greensboro legislative agenda can be sent to Raleigh where it will promptly be put in the round file. What would be a vast improvement is if the City Council actually spent some time discussing an issue that mattered, like the budget or how the recently passed $226 million bond money will be spent, but that is unlikely to happen. This council is a master of straining at gnats and swallowing camels. The City Council didn’t even follow its own policy on this year’s legislative agenda. What the City Council had agreed to do at several earlier meetings on the legislative agenda was to only include items that Greensboro needed and that the City Council had reason to believe that the state legislature would pass. In the past, the City Council has included a slew of political issues where the City Council, with eight Democrats, is diametrically opposed to the political will of the legislature, where both the state Senate and House have veto-proof Republican majorities. City Councilmember Justin Outling was the chief advocate for trying to get along with the legislature and actually attempting to get some legislation important to Greensboro passed rather than using the legislative agenda to make political statements that only serve to alienate the Republican lawmakers in Raleigh. However, Councilmember Marikay Abuzuaiter insisted that a resolution supporting in-state tuition for illegal immigrants be included. It is not a city issue and is not one that the Republican legislature supports. Outling said, “I am not going to support it because I am not going to support putting politics over our goals.” Outling said that if that item was going to be added, he believed the City Council would be better off not having a legislative agenda, and he then made a motion that the City Council not pass a legislative agenda. He said he was absolutely in favor of in-state tuition for illegal immigrant students but that this was not the forum to promote the issue. Outling added that if the City Council was going to insist on including the instate tuition for illegal immigrants issue then the city should fire its lobbyist because it didn’t make sense to hire a lobbyist to try and get along with the legislature and then do something that defeats that purpose. Outling’s motion failed on a 3 to 6 vote with Councilmembers Tony Wilkins, Mike Barber and Outling voting in favor of not having a written legislative agenda. The items on the legislative agenda all passed. Outling said that if his motion failed he would vote for in-state tuition because he was in favor of it, although he didn’t think it should be on the legislative agenda. The nine items on the legislative agenda are: (continued on next page) Tom Foolery CLEAN, SECURE, SAFE, INDOOR 3rd location coming soon on NC Highway 68 near I-40 Now Taking Reservations at www.Beesafe.com • Loading dock available at the Battleground location Tom Foolery • All interior storage units are fully climate controlled • Sizes from 5’ x 5’ to 10’ x 30’ • Wine storage with temperature and humidity control • Wine storage units from 2’ x 2’ to 3’ x 6’ • Postal service available onsite at the Battleground location 3 GREAT LOCATIONS 1016 Battleground Avenue Greensboro, NC (336) 332-0123 4435 Jessup Grove Road Greensboro, NC (across from Proehlifi c Park) (336) 605-3202 3rd location opening soon 702 Sunshine Way, Greensboro

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