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Rhino Times - 2017-03-16
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-03-16 00:00:00
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    Page 11

    yes (continued from page 9) there is a distinctly less positive air to Say Yes than there was when it was a feel-good plan for everyone in the community with no highly negative baggage. Also, for some elected officials who voted to show support for the program, one of the big selling points that helped get everyone on board is that it benefited the middle class as well as the needy. That was a key factor when the program was presented to the community in 2015, and Say Yes wouldn’t have garnered the same widespread support, notoriety and enthusiasm if it were just another one of many programs established to help the poor. Economic development officials, for instance, liked the fact that Say Yes would draw people to Guilford County from across the economic spectrum – not just the needy – and many Guilford County commissioners appreciated that it was a program that would, for a change, help middle class families and even those who are very well off. There are already countless federal, state and nonprofit programs that help pay college costs for low-income families, but one of the very appealing things about Say Yes for many was cooper (continued from page 2) disagreements, but not recognizing his predecessor for the good work he did during natural disasters made Cooper look like a small man. If Cooper came down to the legislature to begin mending fences, he didn’t do a good job. The Republicans sat on their hands with blank stares, looking at their watches during most of the speech. Cooper talked about how, when he was in the Senate, there was a Democratic majority in the Senate and a Republican majority in the House but they managed to work out compromises and get things done. But there was no sign in his speech that he remembered how to compromise. It looks like it’s going to be a long four years for Cooper, and after that speech, the Republican legislators are probably looking for some way to take away more of Cooper’s power. The impression was that if Cooper vetoes a bill, the Republicans will relish the opportunity to override his veto. that it applied to those with low and high incomes. One Facebook poster, Des Baker, stated: “How can your program which was touted by our former superintendent and our current superintendent as the best thing to happen to our students all of the sudden change course and fund students that are the ‘most in need?’ You do realize that the working class parents are the ones who will suffer, low-income students will already be receiving the most financial aid. What about the parents and students who make too much to receive aid but don’t make enough to pay for the $17000 plus it now costs to attend state school? Thanks Say Yes, for essentially Saying No to my child.” Back in August, Skip Moore, the former president of the Weaver Foundation, spoke on the major effect the program would have on bringing people and businesses to the area. “This is as much an economic development program as it is an education program,” Moore told the Guilford County commissioners at that time. Under new guidelines, the program is not expected to provide that boost to the local economy. Say Yes is now pointing out in released statements that it never promised not to change: “On the scholarship page of the Say Yes Guilford website, the partnership is careful to note that the guidelines listed represent ‘a working policy’ and that ‘the Scholarship Board will continue to meet to refine policy.’” That may be in the fine print, but the program was unequivocally sold to the community as a benefit to families of all income levels. In September 2015, former Superintendent of Guilford County School’s Mo Green and wealthy Say Yes founder George Weiss told a packed gymnasium at Ragsdale High School – amidst a sea of cheering kids waiving pom-poms and balloons with confetti falling from above – that the program was there to benefit all of the kids in the gym and in the Guilford County school system. Say Yes has stated that the organization will release more data and announce the new guidelines by the end of March. For now, there are a lot of questions hanging in the air. Among those are how many students have been funded and how much money has been paid out and who will be granted access to the program for the 2017-2018 school year. The group may also provide more detail on how this happened. Here’s www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 11 the current official answer from Say Yes: “While local and national leaders worked in good faith to create a scholarship program in the fall of 2015 that would be available to the class of 2016, the Scholarship Board’s review has determined that the current formulas for scholarship awards are not sustainable. The experience of our first year in Guilford has far exceeded our expectations, as more than 2,000 recent Guilford County Schools graduates went off to colleges and other postsecondary programs with scholarships provided by, or arranged through, Say Yes Guilford. Unfortunately, the average dollar amount of those scholarships was much higher than originally projected.” In this, the first year of the program, the 2016-2017 school year, Say Yes is so far only paying for one year – but the program is designed to fund four years of college for a student – so the actual cost, if the full program were implemented would be something close to $6.1 million times four – $24.4 million. (The actual number would vary according to number of dropouts, class size in the coming years, etc.) But $24.4 million would use up about half of the endowment, so the figures are even further off than they seem originally.

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    Page 12

    12 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com County Grooming Workforce For Attractive Suitors by Scott D. Yost In Kevin Costner’s Field of Dreams, the theme was, “If you build it, they will come” – but now, Guilford County’s key economic development strategy mantra is, “If you train a workforce, they will come.” At times, top area economic development officials have a fairly glamorous job that involves things like flying off to the Paris Air Show or taking a jaunt through Germany to help lure a wiener schnitzel factory to the triad. However, one of the least glamorous, more down to earth – but equally essential – parts of that effort is helping to develop a countywide workforce that will attract new businesses. That effort has never been more evident than right now when so much discussion among Guilford County commissioners, public school system and community college leaders and economic development officials has focused on a slew of programs to enhance workforce development in this area. Superintendent of Guilford County School’s Sharon Contreras is clearly making training students for today’s workforce a priority. For years, the school system has justified requests for large amounts of money based on the argument that a high-quality school system enhances economic development – and Contreras says she is laser-focused on training students for the job market. Contreras has been getting a good deal of praise from Guilford County commissioners that has nothing at all to do with the fact that she’s overcome a severe hearing impediment to reach great heights, and it has everything to do with her push for major change in the county’s high schools. At the Guilford County Board of Commissioners retreat in early February, Contreras offered a wake up call for Guilford County when she told the commissioners that things need to change in a big way. “As I look at the schools, I see that we are still building, redesigning and renovating schools based on the 19thcentury factory model, with four walls and a teacher in front,” Contreras told the commissioners. “That’s just not the current way that you design schools.” She said that, instead, when schools are built or remodeled, those efforts should include very flexible and large workspaces “that allow for problembased learning, project-based learning, and critical-thinking.” That would include more hands-on, real world training such as those students are likely to need once employed. Contreras is also on a mission to bring technology-rich high schools to Guilford County, which she said are now “very limited” here, as well as to create P-TECH, or vocationbased, high schools in the county. When she was superintendent of the school system in Syracuse, New York, that system built P-TECH high schools, which stands for “Pathways in Technology Early College High School.” The first P-TECH high school opened in Brooklyn in 2011 and since then they have been growing in popularity across the country. She said these are high schools that allow students to graduate with a high school diploma and an associate’s degree in manufacturing technology, engineering technology or electrical engineering technology, and she added that employers, the school system and GTCC would work together closely in the initiative. She said area school system leaders have been trying to improve the schools by enhancing workforce readiness. She said one key aspect of that which is seeing a great deal of support among school officials is “career technical education,” also known as “vocational education.” She said the issue of preparing students for employment “transcends race, gender, social and economic class,” and she added that it’s essential given the nature of the businesses Guilford County is attracting. “So we’ve been thinking a great deal as my transition team goes to work about what kind of schools and programs we need,” she told the commissioners. “I’ve been thinking a lot about the megasite,” she said, “in order to ensure that our residents have the jobs within the county, within the region, and within the state. “We have to make sure we have a manufacturing high school,” she said, “a high school that prepares students for those manufacturing jobs.” Of course, one big problem with the current economic environment in Guilford County is that there has been a wholesale exit of manufacturing jobs over the last several decades. Contreras told commissioners that the program in the works gets employers to say to students that, once they complete high school, those students will be first in line for open positions. She said the program had been successful in New York and now school officials are exploring how best to implement the program here. “We also started it on health careers with a local hospital where they had shortages,” she said of her time heading up the Syracuse school system before taking a job as the head of Guilford County Schools last summer. “We are thinking about public safety schools where you can grow people who can take jobs in computer forensics and cyber-security,” she said. “This region runs number two in the nation in terms of technology jobs. We must make sure students are prepared so that we don’t have to call upon folks from outside of the state to take jobs that are right here in the triad region.” Contreras is clearly interested in the workforce initiative for the well-being and employability of the students, but area economic development officials are focused on workforce development as a draw for new businesses. They say a skilled and well-trained workforce is essential for attracting businesses to the coming aviation megasite at Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA) or the Greensboro-Randolph County megasite. A lot of local leaders are putting a good deal of faith into the Greensboro- Randolph County megasite, but currently it is just a very large empty field in Randolph County. Also, though the site is targeting certain industry sectors, it is not now known what companies if any will locate there in five (continued on page 14)

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 13

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    Page 14

    14 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com workforce (continued from page 12) years or eight years, so it’s quite a task to adequately match up today’s education with those future job prospects. PTIA Airport Executive Director Kevin Baker said he’s constantly stressing the need for new aviation workers in this area. He said the airport’s collaboration with Guilford Technical Community College (GTCC) has been invaluable in convincing aviation companies to locate at PTIA, and to expand there as well. “For what we do at the airport, GTCC is the crown jewel,” Baker said. Baker said that when he and others are attempting to recruit companies, one of the fi rst questions is whether a qualifi ed workforce is available. He said one huge benefi t for this area is the ability to train workers in whatever specialty is needed. “GTCC is the way we get that,” Baker said. He said that GTCC works closely with aircraft companies to train people on the airport grounds. Baker said that, when HondaJet needed workers skilled in making a particular type of fuselage, GTCC produced a team of workers with that specific skill. “You can’t put a price on that,” he said. Workforce development issues and strategies completely dominated the discussion at a large meeting recently between the Leadership Group of the Guilford County Economic Development Alliance (GCEDA) and the GCEDA Business Advisory Council. The two boards meet four times a year and that meeting brought together 22 business leaders, elected offi cials, economic development staff and others focused on promoting economic growth in Guilford County. At the meeting, held at GTCC’s Cameron Campus in Colfax, GTCC President Randy Parker, who sits on the Business Advisory Council, spoke on the role of the community college’s coming Center for Advanced Manufacturing – a giant facility in the works on High Point Road next to GTCC’s Jamestown Campus. That manufacturing training center, which will house a transportation and welding program and will help train workers needed in the aviation and automobile industry and in others sectors where THE TRIAD’S LARGEST EVENT FOR HOME & GARDEN MARCH 24-26 Greensboro Coliseum Discount tickets at Friday & Saturday 10am-8pm | Sunday 11am-5pm Adults $10 at the door | Under 15 free with paying adult SouthernIdealHomeShow.com 800.849.0248 | A Southern Shows Inc. Production the county is focusing it’s business recruitment efforts. Parker said that center will be training students either late this year or early next year. He also said GTCC may get a grant for some of the machinery and tools at the facility. “We have the potential of $800,000 from the Golden Leaf Foundation,” Parker said. “So that’s moving along and supports a lot of the needs.” Once that facility is open, it will dramatically increase the county’s ability to train workers. “The building is so big, we call it a campus now – it’s six acres under roof,” Parker said. He said the center will train workers for HAECO Americas’ expansion at PTIA. “HAECO is adding their big hanger and is going to be adding 500 employees or 600 employees for that operation,” Parker said. “We met with them last week to start the training program for that. They are going to need somewhere in the neighborhood of 300 sheet metal workers on Jan. 1, [2018], so we are trying to fi gure out how to do that. We’ll be working with them and trying to get all of their training needs met so that, when the hanger is open and ready to go, we’ll be ready.” The large group of economic development offi cials is expected to go on a tour of the facility toward the end of May. Parker said the new advanced manufacturing center will double the school’s welding capacity and triple the machining capacity. “Right now on both welding and machines we’re so tight you can’t hardly walk around in the rooms because you’ve got so many pieces of equipment in such a small space, and they pretty much are hooked up night and day for our curriculum students,” he said. According to Parker, one key is that the center will be able to individualize the training to match specifi c company needs. Parker said GTCC is also working with High Point offi cials to beef up the furniture industry workforce since those workers are more in demand. He said companies come in and ask for workers with specialized skills. “We’ll need to have a place where we can say, ‘We can have that training,’ and we can start it because we’ll have the space.” Parker said. “It does give us the capacity to do really neat things.” Logistics and distribution is a growing industry in the county so there’s also an effort to increase the number of truck drivers. R&R Transportation Inc. President Karl Robinson, a member of the advisory council, spoke at the meeting on those increasing needs. “We still have a shortage of drivers locally,” he said. “We’ve made a partnership for a nonprofi t to put drivers in the truck driving school in Thomasville. We’re also in talks with them to move a truck driving school to Guilford County.” Lillian Plummer, executive director of the Workforce Development Board in Guilford County, and a member of the Business Advisory Council, said she and others were working to pull together an “Apprenticeship Summit” that would enhance opportunities for those adults and teenagers working as apprentices to learn trades. Plummer said that will likely happen at the end of March. engine (continued from page 7) Guilford County has had with parks after taking over the operation of the county’s parks system nearly fi ve years ago. Until then, the management of the county’s parks was handled by the cities of Greensboro and Burlington, and Forsyth County – local governments that, unlike Guilford County, had experience running parks. In one situation, for instance, a Guilford County park had a baseball fi eld that was unusable for competitive play because it had the wrong measurements. In another instance, the county spent a great deal of money – one former parks worker estimated $200,000 – to restore a historic farmhouse at Northeast Park to teach school children and other visitors about farm life a century ago, but that project was never completed and no educational tours have been given. One source familiar with the train said this week that the experts discovered that the train did very well when going in a straight line; however, problems occurred whenever it took turns. It would obviously be out of the question to have the train only go in a straight line because, in order to arrive back at the station, it would need to travel completely around the world. That much track and bridge work would be cost prohibitive and there’s also the fact that it would be extremely diffi cult to get the needed right-ofway permissions from multiple foreign countries. Also, the trip would take about three years.

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    Page 15

    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 15 Uncle Orson Reviews Everything UNCLE ORSON Reviews Images, Cards, by Orson Scott Card For those who, like me, are stuck with Windows 10, it’s plain that this time, Microsoft actually tried to deliver a stable operating system. But, as usual, they have proven themselves completely unconcerned with the experience of the user. Our duty is to salute, thank Bill Gates and keep our Steve Jobs, Jersey Girl complaints to ourselves, because Windows is what it is, so live with it. Our gripes may seem petty compared to the grand vision of world domination that motivates Bill Gates. But for me, at least, I want to be in control of the screen I have to look at while I do all my work. To this end, for years I used a program called Wallmaster to shuffle through the thousands of images I have on my computer and tile them onto the screen as wallpaper – the background behind the programs that I run. I tile them so I can see the entire image beside or between whatever programs I have open. There are more than 30,000 images ranging from photographs of nature and architecture to art by great masters and contemporary favorites of mine. With Windows 10, you can supposedly “personalize” your computer by instructing it to shuffle through the images in a file you specify, and you can tile those images, too. So everything should be fine, right? Except this is Microsoft, so nothing works as advertised. First, when I set it up to be just as I want it, within an hour or two everything is back to the defaults – it doesn’t stay personalized. I learned how to trick Windows 10, though, by leaving the screen settings window minimized instead of closing it. Only then do my settings remain. But that’s not enough. Because even though Windows 10 asks you very nicely which directory it should look in to find background images, it still looks through the entire disk to find image files. So while the majority of my background images come from that wallpaper directory with 30,000 images, about a tenth of the time, what pops up comes from completely unrelated directories. The worst is when Windows pulls up images from my familyphotograph directory. Now, these are mostly pictures of people that I love. But many of them are pictures of loved ones who have died. When their faces pop up on my screen, I can’t ignore them. So I’m writing a review column, for instance, and suddenly there’s the face of my dead son, and how can I keep writing about something as trivial as Windows 10? There’s a picture of my recently deceased father. There’s my good (continued on page 16)

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    Page 16

    16 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com uncle orson Children’s Schedule DRAMA CENTER CHILDREN’S THEATRE Odell Auditorium • GSO College 815 W. Market St. The Princess and the Magic Pea The Children’s Theatre presents The Princess and the Magic Pea, a lively musical version of Hans Christian Anderson’s classic tale about a prince searching for a true princess. Shows are Friday, March 17 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, March 18 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., and Sunday, March 19 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8. For more information, call the box offi ce at (336) 335-6426 or visit www.thedramacenter.com. CENTRAL LIBRARY 219 N. Church St. Brave Enjoy a free family-friendly fi lm in the children’s programming room on Saturdays at 2 p.m. March 18 is Brave, March 25 is Nanny McPhee Returns and April 1 is Zathura. For information, call (336) 373-2471 or visit greensboro-nc.gov. KATHLEEN CLAY EDWARDS LIBRARY 1420 Price Park Road Family Vegetable Gardening Saturday, March 18 at 11 a.m., master gardeners will teach hands-on gardening activities indoors for children ages 5 and older while parents attend a separate adult vegetable gardening class. This event is free. For more information, call (336) 373-2923 or visit greensboro-nc.gov. MOREHEAD RECREATION CENTER 101 Price Street, High Point Stop, Drop and Roll Saturday, March 18 from noon to 1 p.m., see what it would be like to become a fi refi ghter – meet with local fi refi ghters and see what equipment they use, along with a tour of the big red truck. For ages 5 to 8. The cost is $2. For more information, visit highpointnc.gov. MICHAELS 1206 Bridford Parkway & 1616 Highwoods Blvd. Kids Club Saturday, March 18 from 10 a.m. to noon, kids 3 and up can enjoy a quick make and take project. The cost is $2 and supplies are included. For more information, visit michaels.com. This schedule brought to you by your friends & neighbors at Coldwell Banker (336) 282-4414 (continued from page 15) friend and sister-in-law who passed away a year ago last Christmas. Yeah, I do my best writing when I’m reminded of grief and loss. How dare Microsoft decide to override my clear instructions? Images from this directory and no other, I said. Nanner nanner, Microsoft replies. Simple solution: Remove all the pictures of friends and family from my computer. Then Windows can’t find them. But I shouldn’t have to do that, should I? I want them there so I can look at them when I choose. I’ve already tried the third-party software that’s supposedly best, but it’s kind of lousy. So ... I have to get used to being emotionally blindsided by Windows 10 while I’m trying to work. Isn’t it wonderful how computers empower us? .... A friend recently had his iPhone die on him. During the days before he could buy a new one, he went through something worse than withdrawal. Our phones are now so much a part of our daily experiences that when the phone suddenly fails, our response is more akin to grief. It’s not a long-term grief, of course. After we buy a new phone and download all the apps we can’t live without, we’ll forget that old phone soon enough. I never wish I still had my old flip phone or my old BlackBerry – oh, wait, sometimes I do wish that – but in truth, Android and Samsung have done a pretty good job of creating an appliance that does what I need. It’s not like my real computers, where I do my daily work. The smartphone, the tablet – they’re for keeping track of emails and messages when something time-sensitive is going on, and playing games or tracking my Fitbit or checking our homesecurity cameras. But this is like having a secretary who takes messages for you, passes through some phone calls, hands you a list of mail to choose to read, and then, when you’re bored, will sit down and play a game with you. And you don’t have to pay the phone a salary or withhold taxes. Phone charges are trivial compared to that. You just have to plug it in at night (or whenever) and try to keep it close to the bars. .... But when my friend’s phone died the death – flickery screen, and then no screen at all – there was no condolence card I could send him. Hallmark, what are you thinking? How could you miss this niche? “I’m so sorry your phone broke. // Don’t even imagine that I’ll lend you mine.” “Lost your phone? // That doesn’t happen to people who know how to take care of nice things.” “Condolences on forgetting your password. // Have you tried ‘password’? How about ‘0000’? ‘ABC123’? ‘MothersMaidenName’?” “I hear that Apple just obsoleted your iPhone. // Now will you finally leave the Evil Empire and join the Rebellion?” There are other occasions that need greeting cards, and don’t have them. For instance: “Oh no! It’s raining in California! // Search on Amazon.com for ‘umbrella.’ Of course, by the time Amazon gets it to you, you’ll be back in a drought.” “Did a March cold snap kill the blossoms in your garden? // Southerners should know by now: Never trust a Spring that begins in January.” “You poor thing. That wonderful new TV series you’ve been meaning to watch // is already over. Now you have to bingewatch 39 episodes in order to converse with anybody.” Yeah, I know. None of these greeting cards rhymed. If you care enough to send the very best, buy Hallmark. I only produce greeting cards that are good enough for who they’re fer. .... When Michael Connelly began writing his deep and gripping novels starring LAPD detective Harry Bosch, Paramount immediately optioned a couple of them and began, according to contract, to develop them for fi lm. Except ... nothing ever got filmed. A couple of other Connelly characters got movies – Blood Work starred, and was directed by, Clint Eastwood, and Michael McConaughey played Mick Haller in The Lincoln Lawyer. (That last fi lm was directed by Brad Furman, whose earliest IMDbPro credit is as Julia Roberts’ personal assistant on Erin Brockovich. Hollywood careers begin however they begin.) Connelly has great fun with his characters getting fi lmed. In later Mick Haller novels, Haller comments on the movie Lincoln Lawyer, which was based on him. Eventually, Connelly was able to get Harry Bosch out of Paramount’s “development hell” – a suitable place, it seemed, for a character named “Hieronymus Bosch,” a painter best known for grotesque images of hell. The trouble with getting a fi lm out of the jaws of a studio is that they demand complete repayment of all their costs. Not just the money they paid the writer for the rights, but also every dime they spent on screenwriters who created never-filmed scripts. At no point do any of the studios accept the risks that every other business incurs. Never do they say, Yes, we hired the wrong writers, our bad, you don’t have to pay us back for scripts we should never have commissioned. No, the studios must recover every dime. When they’re dealing with each other – you know, when Fox picks up a project from Paramount’s turnaround – then Paramount is probably going to charge Fox exactly what Paramount spent. But when it’s the author buying back his rights, they use standard studio never-a-profit accounting – you know, the accounting system that makes it so that huge hit movies never make a “profi t,” keeping people with a percentage of profi ts from ever getting paid. Connelly sued the studio just so the courts would supervise the accounting of Paramount’s expenses. They ended up with an agreement that included, of course, complete nondisclosure. So we don’t know what Connelly had to pay to buy back the rights to his characters from a company that never made the movie. (continued on page 22)

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    Page 17

    RHINO www.rhinotimes.com March 16, 2017 REALESTATE Everything you need to find, finance and buy the house of your dreams Luxury BATHROOMS BY SANDY GROOVER One of the most sought after features in new homes today is a luxurious master bathroom with a spa-like atmosphere, where relaxation and elegance play a major role. Custom homebuilders such as Kevin Jones of Kevin Jones (continued on page 19) S E R V I N G T H E T R I A D F O R O V E R 2 0 Y E A R S Find a Triad home here. view all our listings at cbtriad.com B U R L I N G T O N G R E E N S B O R O K E R N E R S V I L L E H I G H P O I N T W I N S T O N - S A L E M Our February OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE WINNERS 1505 Westover Terrace Greensboro, NC 27408 336-282-4414 2212 Eastchester Drive High Point, NC 27265 336-889-5300 Linda Faircloth 336-847-4970 Amanda Farabow 336-870-3055 Moo Moo Councill 336-457-0701 Ed Stafford 336-669-5106 Elizabeth Sheffield 336-259-7944 Chris Wynne 336-688-2321 Rhonda Turbyfill 336-207-7070 Stephanie Long 336-655-1354 cbtriad.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated.

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    Page 18

    18 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com REAL ESTATE The New York Times ACROSS 1 Big hits 5 Something repeatedly hit with a thumb 13 Flat bread 18 Zeitgeist 20 Recurring theme in Philip K. Dick novels 21 Cousin of a mandrill 22 [Circled letters]- filled contraption 24 Cry for more 25 Affirm one’s humanity? 26 Tangible 27 Swell 29 Capote, informally 30 World landmark built with [circled letters] 35 Being repaired, as a car 38 Spots 39 It’s hard to bear 41 Halfhearted, as support 42 Can’t wait to find out, in a way 45 [Circled letters]- based drugs 51 Check out 52 Unvarnished 53 Great confusion 54 Sea serpent of old cartoons 55 Citrus hybrid 56 Bomb developed in the 1950s Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). crossword puzzle No. 0305 IT’S ELEMENTARY BY TIMOTHY POLIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 58 College party epicenter, often 59 Homeland of Spartacus 60 [Circled letters]- advertised establishment 63 “What did I tell you?” 64 Berried conifer 65 Existentialist Kierkegaard 66 Language heard along the Mekong 67 Banana-liqueur cocktail 69 Poorly 72 Letter on a dreidel 73 Picture displayed on a [circled letters] surface 78 Fails to 80 Kind of developer 81 Conservative portfolio asset, for short 82 Convinced 83 Worthless 84 Now hear this! 86 Obsolescent players 87 Put a stop to? 88 [Circled letter]- consuming activity 91 “That’s great!” 92 Strain to avoid? 93 Stinky 94 Underlying cosmic principle 95 Ones getting all the breaks 99 Sports implement often made from [circled letters] 105 Smokers should knock it off 106 Soldiers’ assignments 108 Betray surprise 109 Be behind 110 Evergreen State airport 113 [Circled letter]- fueled device 118 One given a citation 119 Not so awkward 120 Hair 121 Certain navel 122 Au courant 123 “What fun!” DOWN 1 North American flycatcher 2 “S.N.L.” alum Cheri 3 Unloading zone 4 Happy hour habitué 5 Jack ____ 6 Guerrilla leader in “For Whom the Bell Tolls” 7 Constellation near Scorpius 8 Low-____ 9 8 x 10, e.g.: Abbr. 10 Fool 11 Garlicky spread 12 Wouldn’t shut up 13 “Geez!” 14 Epitome of simplicity 15 Condition contributed to by a lack of [circled letters] 16 Rider of the horse Tornado 17 Outdo 19 Turns into confetti 21 Seaman’s chapel 23 Ingredients in some London pies 28 Top story 31 Things bouncers are supposed to catch 32 Sylvan 33 Denouement 34 “A.S.A.P.!” 36 Beowulf or Gilgamesh 37 Jewelry-store gadget 40 Watch, as a criminals’ hiding spot 42 Do a wine steward’s job 43 Waffle brand 44 She, in Salerno 45 Incense 46 ____ twins of 1980s-’90s TV 47 State confidently 48 Mire 49 Minute ____ 50 Dispatched, as a dragon 52 Foreign capital whose name sounds like a water passage to San Francisco 57 He married Daisy Mae in 1952 59 Homes on the range 61 Lad 62 Ride hard 63 Who wrote, “I exist, that is all, and I find it nauseating” 67 Branded footwear with open backs 68 “Everything’s fine” 69 Think piece? 70 Capital of Togo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 71 Fabled [circled letters]-hiding trickster 73 Quatre halved 74 Exhibits one of the seven deadly sins 75 Modern acronym for “Seize the day!” 76 Trudge 77 Eliciting nervous laughter, say 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 79 Market share? 80 Poverty, e.g. 84 Issue for a noble family? 85 Tiny amount 89 W.W. II moniker 90 KPMG hiree 91 Certain platonic friend 94 Shock, in a way 95 Yogurt-based Indian drink 96 Employ against 97 Brand with classic “But wait, there’s more … !” infomercials 98 Leave at a loss 100 Everglades wader 101 Ballet-school supporter 102 Muff 103 Came to 104 To the point 107 Tartan wearer 111 Numerical prefix 112 Big heart? 114 British can 115 Itinerary abbr. 116 “Now I’ve got it!” 117 Image on a Wisconsin state quarter OPEN HOUSES • MARCH 19, 2017 • 2-4PM 276 Water Mill Road Kernersville, NC 27284 3BR 2.5BA (805485) Lisa Pfefferkorn 336-972-1234 $225,000 2865 Fleming Road Greensboro, NC 27410 3BR 1BA (813025) Karen Weidt 336-312-6748 $172,000 5410 Francisco Drive Greensboro, NC 27410 3BR 3BA (824720) Stacy Parent 336-681-3461 $359,900 814 Hillcrest Drive High Point, NC 27262 4BR 3BA (805683) MooMoo Councill 336-457-0701 $290,000 4036 Stillbrook Lane High Point, NC 27265 4BR 2.5BA (826159) Ed Stafford 336 669-5106 $239,500

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    Page 19

    REAL ESTATE bathrooms (continued from page 17) www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 19 Design-Build and Kathy Dumas of R&K Custom Homes build their homes with the very latest in bathroom design innovations that are a far cry from the utilitarian bathrooms so many of us grew up with. Both Jones and Dumas said that more of their customers are requesting master baths with just showers and no bathtubs. Dumas said the divide is about 60/40. And when a customer does request a bathtub, it is usually a freestanding tub rather than a built-in. These freestanding tubs are often modernized versions of the standard whirlpool-type tubs of years past. Jones said the newest type of jetted tub is the “bubble” or “air” tub. The tubs use air, instead of jets of water, to provide a full-body massage experience. And because air tubs are drained between use, they are self-drying and “selfcleaning.” Today’s showers are far bigger than those of the past. Most are walk-in, often two-person, zero-entry showers without glass doors. If they do have glass doors, they are generally frameless and made with shower glass coated with Euro-shield, which removes the need for using a squeegee after every use. Inside the shower, you’ll find body jets than can be angled to massage different parts of the body, along with rainfall showerheads. Built-in sound-system speakers that can be controlled by a smart-phone via Wi-Fi are also popular. Smart phones can even be used to turn on the shower before ever leaving the warmth of one’s bed. Another feature that is growing in popularity are steam showers. Jones said that they require installation of a special water line by plumbers along with a dedicated electrical outlet for the mini boiler that heats the water that produces the steam that is forced into the shower through copper piping. A thermostat in the shower controls the steam, and these showers can include an aromatherapy feature to help with relaxation. Programmable thermostats can also be set to turn on heated floors, and to drape yourself in warmth when you emerge from your spa shower or tub, heated towel bars can be installed. A special electrical connection is needed to produce the heat that warms a liquid in the towel bar. These bars cost about $500 says Jones. Of course, lighting is an important part of the luxury bathroom. Under-cabinet LED strips produce soft lighting, while recessed fixtures or pendants over vanities are used for task lighting. You’ll often find these rooms lit by elegant chandeliers, recessed ceiling light fixtures, pendant lamps over vanities, lighted tiles in showers and freestanding lamps that illuminate reading spots within the room. Manufacturers like Kohler even have technology for showers and tubs that diffuse feel-good light in a variety of colors into the water, called “chromotherapy.” There is a wide variety of styles available when it comes to choosing the bathroom cabinetry. Dumas said they are finding that their customers like the modern country look and white and gray are popular cabinet colors as they make the room feel bigger. Soft close doors and drawers are pretty much standard features in all cabinets now, and modern European-style cabinets that are generally frameless and provide clean lines are very popular. Dumas said a popular feature with their customers is a tower cabinet on top of counters to house toiletries and small bathroom appliances like blow dryers and curling irons, keeping them close at hand but out of sight. Jones pointed out that outlets – and therefore appliances – can also be hidden behind a drawer. The appliance remains plugged in – open the drawer to use it, then close the drawer when finished. No more blow dryers left on countertops. Jones said a lot of modern bathrooms have floating vanities with at least 10 inches of open space beneath them. The space eliminates dirt-collecting nooks and crannies and makes cleaning easier. Ease of cleaning, along with good looks, has made quartz a popular material for countertops. Quartz never needs to be sealed like granite; however, it is not scorch-resistant, so care much be taken with heat-producing items like curling irons. Cleaning is also made easier by the use of “rectified” tiles in the bath. Jones said that rectified tiles nearly eliminate the need for grout. He said he knows people hate grout, since it’s never easy to clean. The use of rectified tiles with their thin grout lines helps cut down on grout cleaning chores. So what are rectified tiles? They are tiles that are manufactured completely square and can therefore butt almost perfectly together. They require minimal grout joints, whereas stamped porcelain tiles have an edge that keeps them from aligning closely, thus the need for more grout. Of course, the thicker the grout line, the more leeway you have available to accommodate uniquely sized or hand-made tiles. Generally, rectified tiles come in large formats of at least 12 inches by 24 inches. Jones said the tiles are quite popular and are used on walls, floors, nearly everything in the bathroom. The tiles can even be used for shower floors when the floor slopes to a linear drain rather than a central circular drain that requires a concave floor design. His-and-her vanities, often in separate sections of the bathroom, feature a variety of sinks and faucet styles. Sinks are available in glass, copper, porcelain, stone, granite, even Acacia and petrified wood. They can be fashioned in almost any shape, but the most popular are round, oval, square and rectangular. A sink can be flush with the countertop, under-mounted or sit on top of the vanity. And the luxury doesn’t stop there. Luxury bathrooms often include gas fireplaces, chairs and recliners for reading, even entertainment centers. Jones mentioned bathroom mirrors that conceal a television screen – when the TV is turned on the mirror fades away. You can see many of the latest innovative new products at the upcoming Southern Ideal Home Show at the Greensboro Coliseum Complex on Friday, March 24 through Sunday, March 26 , or in newly built homes during the Greensboro Builder’s Association Spring Parade of Homes the weekends of April 29 and April 30 and May 6 and May 7. OPEN HOUSES • MARCH 19, 2017 • 2-4PM 2018 Emilia Court High Point, NC 27262 3BR 3BA (820193) Amanda Farabow 336-870-3055 $280,000 179 Winged Foot Court Winston Salem, NC 27107 5BR 4BA (815852) Lawana McNeill 336-880-1100 $374,900 To list your home please call (336) 763-4170

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    Page 20

    20 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, March 16, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com REAL ESTATE LOCALREALTOR DIRECTORY www.realestate.rhinotimes.com Helping Families Achieve Their Dreams. Walt Anderson / Realtor 336.908.2830 email - waltanderson@kw.com “Serving Buyers and Sellers in the Triad Area” Successfully selling homes for 30 years Betty Howard 336.337.7535 betty@bettyhoward.com Chidi Akwari 336.337.1927 Chidi@Akwari.com Wayne Young 336.253.4472 wayne.young@allentate.com www.allentate.com/wayneyoung YOUR MORTGAGE EXPERTS 336.404.4282 NMLS ID: 103613 Wayne Hardister FIRST CAROLINA MORTGAGE waynehardister@yahoo.com Adam McKim David Nishan Debbie Barrow 336.253.2667 adam.mckim@suntrust.com 336.215.5597 www.davidnishan.net 336.373.5156 Debbie.barrow@suntrust.com www.suntrust.com/debbie.barrow NMLSR ID: 659105 NMLS ID: 174359 NMLSR ID: 659011 Melanie Don Scarborough Troutman Loan Originator Don Scarborough Eric R. Apple 336.944.3267 336.970.3223 Why close on time... When you can Close Early? don.scarborough@community1.com www.melanietroutman.com NMLS ID: ID: 872030 46497 336.944.3267 don.scarborough@community1.com NMLS ID: 872030 336.402.3695 www.ericapple.com NMLS ID: 457614

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