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Rhino Times - 2017-08-03
Magazines / Newspapers | Government 2017-08-03 00:00:00
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    Vol. V No. 31 Greensboro, North Carolina www.rhinotimes.com Thursday, August 3, 2017 National Night Out John Hammer Yourse $95K Payment: The Rest of the Story plus Under The Hammer, Uncle Orson Reviews Everything AND MORE CAROLINA J O U R N A L

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    2 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com THE WEEKLY Hammer The Weekly Hammer Downtown Needs Women ... and Men by John Hammer Not long after former City Councilmember Zack Matheny took over as president of Downtown Greensboro Inc. (DGI) in the summer of 2015, I was in his office and he was showing me maps of the downtown. He tends to flip through things pretty fast so you have to pay attention to keep up. Zack was telling me that his plan was to get two new parking garages built in downtown Greensboro and pointing to possible locations on a map. Then he said he was going to get developers to build the parking decks and in return the developers would have the air rights to build over them. The first floors of the parking decks would be retail, and over the parking decks would be 10 or maybe 20 stories of office, residential or whatever the developer wanted to build. Then he said the words no journalist wants to hear: “But you can’t write about it.” Zack said writing about it would kill the deals because there were a lot of moving parts. Boy were there ever a lot of moving parts, but now, almost two years later, two parking decks are going to be built by developers in downtown Greensboro and then the developers are going to build over them. The parking deck on East Market and South Davie streets will have a Westin hotel built over it that faces South Elm Street. Nobody is quite sure what Roy Carroll, who is the publisher of this newspaper, plans to build over the parking deck at the corner of Bellemeade and North Eugene streets, but part of it will reportedly be an Aloft hotel. I thought Zack was being overly optimistic when he was talking about two parking decks with multi-story buildings over them, but it turns out he wasn’t. It took some time, and just one of the stumbling blocks was finding someone to buy the Dixie Building who would agree to keep the building but sell the parking lot. Now Zack has turned to residential development in the downtown. One big difference in the W. Market St. DGI’s map of potential sites for residential development in downtown Greensboro conversation I had with Zack this week is that I can write about it, and the other is that I’m convinced Zack will do it, where as before I had my doubts. One of the issues Greensboro’s central business district has is that there aren’t enough people living downtown, but it’s not because W. Friendly Ave. W. Washington St. S. Eugene St. people don’t want to – the vacancy rate in downtown residential property is only 4.7 percent. The problem is that there aren’t enough places for people to live. I could go into a long diatribe here about how 20 years ago the city made it practically impossible to build N. Greene St. N. Elm St. N. Davie St. N. Church St. residential downtown, but I won’t. Downtown Greensboro currently has 2,683 residents, which is not bad compared to Durham with 2,500 and Winston-Salem with 2,982. But it is far behind Greenville, South Carolina, known for its renewed and vibrant (continued on page 8)

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 3

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    4 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com THE WEEKLY Hammer First Amendment by John Hammer After reading the editorial in the News & Record on Wednesday, August 2, about House Bill 205 – to open public notice and legal advertising to the free market system, which was passed by the legislature and vetoed by Gov. Roy Cooper – I had to pull out my Constitution and read the First Amendment a couple of times to make sure I hadn’t forgotten a passage. The editorial begins, “We want to thank Gov. Roy Cooper for protecting the First Amendment rights of Guilford County newspapers – and by extension, the county’s citizens – by vetoing House Bill 205.” The News & Record must be talking about some other First Amendment because the First Amendment of the US Constitution has nothing in it about guaranteeing paid-circulation newspapers a monopoly on publishing public notices and legal advertising. The implication that eliminating a monopoly on public notices and legal advertising for paid circulation newspapers is somehow an infringement of freedom on the press is dishonest at best. The First Amendment gives Americans the right to publish a newspaper; it doesn’t say that the government will fund it. Further along, the editorial writer gets to the meat of the subject. This is all about money, not freedom of the press. The News & Record and every other newspaper that has been feeding at the public trough because of a state mandated monopoly on public notice and legal advertising will still be just as free to publish whatever they desire if HB205 becomes law. The difference is that the taxpayers won’t be forced to help Protects Speech, Not Monopolies pay for it whether they agree with the newspaper or not. HB205 does not preclude governments from placing their public notices in newspapers. If Greensboro or Guilford County choose to continue to pay exorbitant rates to have public notices placed in the News & Record, they are free to do so. What the law would do is open public notice and legal advertising to the free market, and this is what the N&R is arguing will infringe on freedom of the press. The News & Record argues that more people have the opportunity to see public notices when they are placed in paid-circulation newspapers rather than on the Guilford County website. But currently, some public notices and legal advertising, which is supposed to be available to all the people of Guilford County, is placed in the Jamestown News. How many of you have seen a copy of the Jamestown News in the past 10 years? How many people even know where they could buy a copy? It is one of the absurdities of the current law that the N&R and Cooper are supporting that the Jamestown News meets the state mandated criteria for public notices and legal advertising in Guilford County. The law that gave paid-circulation newspapers a monopoly on this statemandated advertising is seriously outdated in today’s world where there are so many new publication formats. The question people should be asking is why are paid circulation newspapers so scared of a little competition. If they want to continue to sell public notice and legal advertising, all they have to do is lower their rates so that they are competitive. No one who has a monopoly wants to give it up, and it’s no surprise that newspapers like the N&R, who have (continued on page 8) table of CONTENTS 2 WEEKLY HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 4 WEEKLY HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 9 CITY COUNCIL’S $95K PAYMENT TO DEJUAN YOURSE – THE REST OF THE STORY BY JOHN HAMMER 10 COUNTY TAX DEPARTMENT SHOULD GET AN A+ BY SCOTT D. YOST 11 UNCLE ORSON BY ORSON SCOTT CARD 8 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John Hammer managing editor ELAINE HAMMER county editor SCOTT D. YOST contributing editor ORSON SCOTT CARD PUBLISHER Roy Carroll CAROLINA J O U R N A L 41 YOST COLUMN BY SCOTT D. YOST 43 ASK CAROLYN BY CAROLYN WOODRUFF 51 UNDER THE HAMMER BY JOHN HAMMER 6 RHINO SHORTS 12-13 NATIONAL NIGHT OUT 15 REAL ESTATE 17 CHILDREN’S SCHEDULE 35 SUDOKU 35 PUZZLE ANSWERS 36 NYT CROSSWORD 39 SOUND OF THE BEEP 46 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Cover: Greensboro Police Lt. Stephanie Mardis at National Night Out in College Hill. Photo by Sandy Groover. More photos pages 12 and 13 GENERAL MANAGER Joann Zollo creative director ANTHONY COUNCIL advertising consultants DONNA GOODWIN 216 West Market Street, Greensboro NC 27401 P.O. Box 9023, Greensboro NC 27429 | (336) 763-4170 (336) 763-2585 fax | sales@rhinotimes.com | www.rhinotimes.com 19

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 5

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    6 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com RHINOSHORTS by John Hammer Why does Greensboro always seem to get dissed? A recent promotion by Visit North Carolina – a promotion paid for by the State of North Carolina called Project 543 – lists a whole bunch of attractions all over the state. But in Greensboro it only lists one – Replacements Ltd. Museums in other cities are promoted, but not the International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro. Other golf tournaments get play but not the Wyndham Championship. Bryan Park has one of the best public golf courses in the state but it gets no mention. Nor does Grandover. The biggest Frying Pan in the state gets a post but not the Greensboro Science Center, LeBauer Park, the Greensboro Coliseum, the ACC Hall of Fame, Guilford Battlefield National Military Park or anything else in the city. Someone going to this site looking for things to do in the state would think the only thing Greensboro has to offer is china. It makes you wonder what Visit North Carolina has against our city. By the way, 543 is the number of miles from Murphy to Manteo and a pretty clever name. Only in the crazy world of North Carolina politics would this happen. The State Board of Elections and Ethics – which exists only on paper – held a public hearing and people came and spoke. I haven’t seen any video, but I assume they spoke to eight empty seats because Gov. Roy Cooper has refused to appoint the eight members to the newly created board that combines the State Board of Elections and the North Carolina Ethics Commission. Four on the new board have to be Democrats and four Republicans, which Cooper doesn’t like because, in the past, the governor’s party has always had a majority on the State Board of Elections as well as all 100 county boards of elections. But the legislature, being run by Republicans, changed all that as well as changing the county boards to four members – two from each party. The courts upheld the changes, including to the state board, but Cooper is appealing it to the North Carolina Supreme Court and won’t appoint anyone until the Supreme Court rules. But it’s causing some problems for Democrats. The districts for state representatives and senators have been ruled unconstitutional by the federal courts because some districts have too high a percentage of black voters. The federal courts had considered ordering that the districts be redrawn and a special election be held a year early in 2017 to fix the problem. One of the reasons the federal judges didn’t order an election for state representatives and senators in 2017 was that there is no state board of elections. In 10 counties, including Guilford, because of resignations, the county boards of elections can’t officially meet and can’t take action because, on a four-member board, three is a quorum. The old elections boards were all three-member boards, so one resignation leaves two sitting members – not enough to meet the quorum requirement to meet or take action. Cooper would love to see a legislative election in 2017 because, with the current veto-proof Republican majorities in both the Senate and the House, the election might help and couldn’t hurt the Democrats. But the governor shot himself in the foot by refusing to appoint the state board even after a three-judge panel ruled it constitutional, giving the federal judges a good reason not to order a special election because with no state board of election and ethics there is no one to run an election. I guess I have to keep harping on this, but shouldn’t City Council meetings be on the “Meetings” list on the City of Greensboro website? Once again the list skips over the City Council meeting on Tuesday, August 15. The list includes the Community Sustainability Council Meeting on Monday, August 14 and the Planning Board meeting on Wednesday, August 16, but there is no listing for the City Council in between them. Doesn’t the City Council want people to know when their meetings are being held? It seems like it would be particularly important this summer when the City Council met only once in July and is scheduled to only meet once in August, or if you believe the city’s own website, the City Council isn’t going to meet at all in August. The National Review said North Carolina Lt. Governor Dan Forest “has established himself as a national leader on campus free speech.” The National Review piled compliments on Forest and the North Carolina legislature for passing the first campus free speech statute in the nation. It wasn’t all compliments – the column did note that North Carolina weakened the legislation in a couple of areas; but was mostly complimentary of the state for ensuring that students and speakers on state university campuses would have the right to free speech. Gov. Cooper let the bill, which passed the legislature with bipartisan support, become law without his signature. In an article in The Boston Globe, the City of Boston admits that those pedestrian crossing buttons at intersections in downtown Boston are mostly for show, meaning they don’t do anything. As near as I can tell, the same is true for downtown Greensboro. The traffic light sequences are set for cars, not pedestrians. The city is not going to create a traffic jam so that someone can cross the street 10 seconds sooner. But for some reason it makes people feel good to press a button. So Boston has the buttons and so do we. Call 811 before you dig. It’s what everyone is told to do but for some reason PCL Civil Constructors, which is building the Oregon Inlet replacement bridge, didn’t. You’d think a with a $250 million project like that, someone would have taken the time to find out exactly where the cables were. If the company doesn’t have good insurance they are in big financial trouble, because Hatteras and Ocracoke depend on the summer tourists to get them through the year. Nobody’s making a lot of money out there in the winter and lawsuits have already been filed.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 7

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    8 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com Parks & Rec Fest and MUSEP at Gillespie Golf Course Photos by Sandy Groover downtown (continued from page 2) downtown with 5,000 residents. And Charlotte is in a different world with 26,000 downtown residents. But compared to our North Carolina neighbors of similar size, Greensboro is doing pretty well until you look at the numbers for downtown residences in development. Durham has 1,348 in development, Winston-Salem 1,283 and Greenville 2,293. Greensboro has 291 downtown residences in development – all of those are apartments at Carroll at Bellemeade. Anyone who has followed residential development downtown knows that it takes a few years to get things rolling. It’s more difficult to build in a downtown area than it is to buy a field, have it rezoned and start popping up two-story apartment buildings. In the downtown area development usually involves putting the property together and demolition before construction can begin. It took Carroll years to acquire the property for Carroll at Bellemeade; and then, for the project to go forward, the City of Greensboro had to agree to close a block of Lindsay Street. All of the 291 residences at Carroll at Bellemeade will be apartments for rent, which means there is nothing currently under development in downtown Greensboro for people who want to buy rather than rent. Although I should probably mention that there are condominiums at Center Pointe, Zack says those are being grabbed up as quickly as they become available. One of Zack’s efforts to help move along downtown residential development is to identify some suitable areas. The sites are outlined in red on the map (page 2). So what Zack is working on now is finding developers who are interested in buying the properties and building apartments or condominiums. Zack said that there were a lot of people who want to live downtown, but he added, “We’ve got to give these people a good place to live and we’re behind.” There has been a 102 percent increase in the number of people living downtown since 2000. They tend to be well-educated, unmarried young adults. Only 3.6 percent of downtown residents are under the age of 14 while 27.5 percent are between 15 and 24, which is the largest age group. Next is 25 to 34 with 22.6 percent of the downtown population. The third largest group is those over 55, who make up 21.3 percent of downtown residents, while the 45 to 54 group only makes up 11.3 percent. The median age of the downtown residents is 32.9. So along with a lot of young people living downtown you also have a sizable number of empty nesters who are selling their large suburban homes and moving downtown for the convenience. Zack says it’s a chicken and egg situation – with more people monopolies (continued from page 4) benefited from this state-mandated monopoly for decades, are fighting it tooth and nail. But something that is rarely mentioned by those newspapers is that both the North Carolina League of Municipalities and the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners support the bill, and it’s easy to see why. The bill sets up a pilot program in Guilford County to test the process of placing public notices and legal advertising on a county website, and the revenue that the county collects for this advertising will be evenly split between Guilford County and the Guilford County Schools. So instead of the money paid for legal advertising in Guilford County going to the N&R and a billionaire in Omaha, Nebraska, it will go to Guilford County to benefit the people downtown, the downtown will attract more amenities, and with more amenities the downtown will attract more residents. But he says the problem right now is that people want to move downtown but there aren’t enough places to live, and he plans to fix it. and the children of Guilford County. If HB205 were about eliminating any other monopoly other than one that benefitted paid circulation newspapers, the N&R would be all for it. But because it is hitting them in the pocket book, it is called a violation of their First Amendment rights. As a free circulation newspaper, the Rhino Times doesn’t meet the state-mandated requirements to run public notices or legal advertising, so it won’t cost us a dime if the state legislature overrides Cooper’s veto. But if HB 205 does become law then a path for the Rhino to be eligible for public notices and paid circulation advertising becomes available. We welcome the opportunity to enter into the free market and compete with everyone else, including Guilford County, for the advertising. Let the lowest rates win.

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    www.rhinotimes.com | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | RHINO TIMES 9 City Council’s $95K Payment to Dejuan Yourse – The Rest of the Story by Scott D. Yost It turns out there is more to Greensboro’s $95,000 settlement with Dejuan Yourse than was previously released. The Greensboro City Council agreed to pay Dejuan Yourse a $95,000 settlement after he filed a complaint about being arrested on his mother’s front porch, which resulted in the two arresting officers resigning and the city apologizing to Yourse. The City Council viewed the police body-worn camera video of Yourse being arrested, and the scuffle where one police officer struck Yourse in the face, before offering the apology. The video of the arrest was also released to the public and there were a lot of public comments at City Council meetings about Yourse being mistreated by the police. Last month, Yourse was back in court facing 12 counts of failure to appear, charges of assault on a female, assault on an unborn child, assault by strangulation, assault and battery, driving while his license was revoked, reckless driving and speeding, and Yourse faces additional charges in Alamance County. When Yourse appeared in court, he asked for a court appointed attorney. The court appoints attorneys who are paid by the state for people who cannot afford to hire their own attorneys. The court noted that Yourse had received a settlement of $95,000 from the City of Greensboro and that he didn’t qualify for a court appointed attorney. Yourse reportedly said that he didn’t get all the money from that settlement, and he was telling the truth. The $95,000 settlement was paid by Greensboro under unusual conditions set by the City Council, which were revealed when the city recently released the minutes of the closed session meeting where it was decided. In the closed session, when the City Council was considering the settlement, the council was told that Yourse owed over $31,000 in back child support payments. City Councilmember Mike Barber said that when that came up, “I said, I cannot agree to any settlement unless we first satisfy the full amount Yourse is in arrears on his child support payments.” The majority of the City Council liked the idea of requiring that Yourse become current on his child support payments and agreed with Barber. However, Councilmember Justin Outling made the motion that the $95,000 settlement be paid without any stipulation that Yourse pay his back child support payments. That motion failed on a 2-to-7 vote with Councilmembers Outling and Jamal Fox voting in favor. Outling reportedly argued that it was unfair to put conditions on the settlement with Yourse when similar conditions were not put on other settlements made by the city. After Outling’s motion failed, Councilmember Sharon Hightower made a motion that the $95,000 settlement be paid with the stipulation that the back child support be paid in full, and that motion passed 6 to 3, with Councilmembers Outling, Fox and Tony Wilkins voting no. Wilkins said he voted no because he didn’t want to pay Yourse anything and Outling and Fox voted no because they didn’t agree with forcing Yourse to pay his back child support. So Barber joined all the women on the City Council – Mayor Nancy Vaughan and Councilmembers Hightower, Yvonne Johnson, Marikay Abuzuaiter and Nancy Hoffmann – in supporting the child support payment. Attorneys familiar with the case said that after paying child support and attorneys fees, Yourse probably ended up with about $30,000 of the $95,000 settlement. Yourse was arrested by Greensboro police when he was sitting on his mother’s front porch, but as with everything in this case it’s more complicated than that. The police were responding to a call from a neighbor who said she had seen someone trying to break into the house by trying to pry the garage door open with a shovel. When asked by police what he was doing with the shovel, Yourse said he was using the shovel to see if his dog was in the garage. Yourse said that the house at 2 Mystywood Court was his mother’s house, but at the time the police didn’t know whether that was true or just some story like using a shovel to look for a dog. The whole situation changed after Yourse was asked for his driver’s license. At first said he didn’t have it, but then he found it in his pocket. Yourse had outstanding warrants for his arrest, something else the police didn’t know at the time. After handing over his driver’s license, Yourse tried to leave the porch and said he wanted to go to a neighbor’s house; then he made a phone call saying that the police were harassing him and he needed help. At that point, Officer Travis Cole attempted to take Yourse’s phone away from him and a scuffle ensured, during which Cole struck Yourse in the face. Officer Charlotte Jackson, who had been in her car trying to verify that the home did belong to Yourse’s mother, assisted Cole in the arrest. Yourse continued to struggle, ending up face down in the grass in the front yard with both officers holding him down. At the time the officers didn’t know whether the house belonged to Yourse’s mother or not, and if they had it might not have helped Yourse’s case because his mother had reported a break-in at her home some time earlier in the year and told police that she suspected her son was the one who had broken in. And there is no dog.

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    10 RHINO TIMES | Thursday, August 3, 2017 | www.rhinotimes.com County Tax Department Should Get An A+ by Scott D. Yost When the Guilford County Tax Department got the property tax collection rate up over 99 percent in fiscal 2015- 2016 – for the first time in 15 years – some county officials questioned if the department could realistically get that rate even higher in fiscal 2016-2017. Well, on June 30, the books closed out for that year and those just released collection numbers show the answer is a resounding yes: The Tax Department could go higher. The collection rate climbed to 99.14 percent of the property taxes levied in the fiscal year that just ended, which was up from 99.09 in 2015-2016. A high tax collection rate is important to Guilford County officials because it means that almost all property owners are paying their “fair share” and it assures that the Guilford County Board of Commissioners has access to nearly all of the legitimate property tax revenue its entitled to spend on county services and projects. Property tax revenue is the number one source of county funding each year, followed by sales tax revenue, which comes in a distance second. Between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017, Guilford County was charged with collecting $331.7 million in property taxes, and, as of the end of June, only about $2.8 million of that remained uncollected. This week, Guilford County Tax Director Ben Chavis said several factors are responsible for the new high in county collection rates. He said those include an improving economy, the transfer of the responsibility for collection of motor vehicle taxes from the county to the state, and a major foreclosure effort by Guilford County that has let citizens know the county means business when it comes to collecting property taxes. Chavis said that more county residents have jobs these days and he said improving economic conditions also make it easier for them to pay their tax bills. “The economy has gotten better, but it’s not as improved as we would like,” Chavis said. Chavis also said the transfer, starting in 2013, of motor vehicle tax collection responsibilities from county tax departments to the State of North Carolina helped in two ways: One, it increased the collection rates on vehicle property taxes because people have to pay the taxes owed to get their registration renewed; and, two, it meant that county tax collectors didn’t have to spend their time collecting taxes on automobiles. Chavis said there are about 425,000 motor vehicles on Guilford County’s tax roles and that collecting taxes on those have been onerous in the past. Cars are harder to collect on than houses, because, unlike houses, cars can be moved around. For all those reasons, Chavis said, he’s happy to see those collection duties now in the hands of the state. “We’re not distracted by motor vehicle collections,” Chavis said. “We’re able to concentrate on real estate full on. I think that has been key for us. We’re in the best place with that.” Assistant Guilford County Tax Director Jim Roland said the data for other North Carolina counties for fiscal 2016-2017 is still coming in, but he added that Guilford County is now “certainly in the top 10” of all counties in the state when it comes to the collection rate. He said his best guess at this point is that Guilford County will end up seventh or eighth this year in the collection rate out of 100 North Carolina counties for fiscal 2016-2017. Like Chavis, Roland said the county’s intense foreclosure effort has unquestionably elevated the collection rate. “I think that has really made a difference,” he said. Roland said that, before the program was in place, Guilford County barely used foreclosure as a tax collection tool. Ten or 15 years ago, for instance, the county might have foreclosed on a half dozen properties a year, while, earlier in 2017, the county had nearly 1,500 parcels of property either in active foreclosure proceedings or on the waiting list to be foreclosed on. “We decided, yes it may be painful for a while,” Roland said of the new foreclosure effort the county established a few years ago. “But we got everyone on board from county staff to the commissioners.” The Tax Department even created a website that lists which property owners are being foreclosed on. Roland said Guilford County is finally starting to get a grip on the giant backlog of foreclosure cases that resulted from the new strategy. About three years ago, the county set up the in-house foreclosure shop – an operation that was a joint effort between the Tax Department and the legal department. Roland said another thing that has helped bump up the collection rate is a decline in appeals filed by taxpayers. He said the Guilford County Board of Equalization and Review, which hears those appeals, decides matters in a timely fashion; however, he added, the same can’t be said for the North Carolina Department of Revenue when Board of Equalization and Review decisions are appealed to that department. “If it goes to the state, it can be there for years,” Roland said of tax appeal cases. Every appeal that lingers past June 30 each year brings that fiscal year’s collection rate down. Roland said that, even on the remaining uncollected taxes, the county will be pursuing those payments for years and will likely get the money in the end. Some foreclosures are on tax bills that are only a couple of years old. Chavis said he was also extremely pleased with the outcome of the county’s reevaluation of all county property. He said there weren’t a lot of complaints from property owners over their new assigned values. “It turned out great,” Chavis said. He said that there were about 2,500 “informal” reviews at taxpayer request after the revaluation and about 1,400 cases ended up with the county’s Board of Equalization and Review. “That worked out beautifully,” the tax director said of the countywide revaluation conducted in 2016. In fiscal 2016-2017, about $2 million more in revenue was collected in real property tax than in 2015-2016. The property tax bills go out in July each year and, for the purposes of calculating the collection rate, the department looks at the percentage of those taxes collected before June 30 the following year. Over the last several years, the Tax Department has also been upping its game when it comes to finding all the taxable property in the county and any improvements to it. Chavis said the addition of high-tech tax tools – such as an advanced computer pictometry system – has helped his department discover unregistered new structures and home improvements. In pictometry, a set of aerial county photos is taken when foliage is at a minimum, generating sharp scalable 3-D images viewable from several different angles. The new images are compared – using computer software – with lower quality images that the county had taken years before. That reveals most changes of any significance. “The pictometry tool will pay for itself,” Chavis said. “That’s why when we presented it to the commissioners we said it was an investment.”

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