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Florida Music Director August 2016
Magazines | Arts / Music 2016-08-04 12:48:54
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    The Neutral Syllable Sending a Soundscape of Subliminal Messages FOA & FLASTA Fall Conference 2016 Healthy Habits for Teachers

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    Contents August 2016 Volume 70 • Number 1 Executive Director Florida Music Education Association Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632 (kdsanz@FloridaMusicEducation.org) Editor-in-Chief Steven Kelly, PhD College of Music, FSU 128 Housewright Building Tallahassee, FL 32306-1180 (850) 644-4069; (850) 644-2033 fax (skelly@admin.fsu.edu) F E AT U R E S The Neutral Syllable: Sending a Soundscape of Subliminal Messages . .............................8 The 2017 Student Conference Experience. ...... 15 FOA & FLASTA Fall Conference 2016 . ....... 16 FMEA All-State Orff Ensemble. ................ 18 FMEA All-State Elementary Chorus . ......... 19 Healthy Habits for Teachers: Avoiding the dreaded teacher burnout. ......... 20 President’s Message. ......... 4 NOTEables. ............... 6 Corporate & Academic Partners. ......... 7 Thank You, Donors. ........ 23 Component News. .........24 d e p a r t m e n t s Committee Reports. ........ 27 Research Puzzles for Music Teachers............ 32 Officers and Directors. ..... 33 Executive Director’s Notes. ..34 Advertisers’ Index. .........34 Editorial Committee Terice Allen (850) 245-8700, Tallahassee (tallen1962@hotmail.com) Judy Arthur, PhD Leon High School, Tallahassee (850) 488-1971 (arthurj@leonperformingarts.org) William Bauer, PhD University of Florida, Gainesville (352) 273-3182; (wbauer@ufl.edu) Judy Bowers, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 644-3005; (jbowers@fsu.edu) Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 645-1438; (aadarrow@fsu.edu) Jeanne Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Largo (727) 588-6055; (reynoldsj@pcsb.org) John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College, Fort Pierce (772) 462-7810; (johnsouthall@FloridaMusicEducation.org) Advertising Sales Valeria Anderson (val@FloridaMusicEducation.org) Richard Brown (richard@FloridaMusicEducation.org) 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 Official FMEA and FMD Photographers Bob O’Lary Debby Stubing Art Director & Production Manager Lori Danello Roberts, LDR Design Inc. (ldrdesign@comcast.net) Circulation & Copy Manager Valeria Anderson, (800) 301-3632 Copy Editor Susan Trainor August 2016 3

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    President’sMessage John K. Southall, PhD President—Florida Music Education Association Diversity in Music Education: Why Should We Care? It is vitally important that we as educators focus on creating more diverse and inclusive music environments for the well-rounded social and academic welfare of our students. We must also research, discuss and develop comprehensive strategies that promote the development of learning environments that are inclusive of ALL K-20 students and are representative of Florida’s ever-changing population. Diversity is also a major principle of social justice. Social justice encompasses an equitable treatment of all, advocacy for human rights, fostering the value of diversity and access to a fair allocation of resources. It is inclusive of challenging injustice and preventing prejudice or discrimination. Social justice ensures that the least advantaged people in the world have access to all beneficial social aspects of life. Today is an important time in our society to address the importance of diversity in music education. There are many societal dimensions to consider. 4 Florida Music Director Dimensions of Diversity Race – Ethnicity – Culture Gender – Socioeconomic status – Age Sexual orientation – Physical ability – Disability Education – Mental ability – Social class Lifestyle – Life interests and experiences – Geographic location Religion – Language – Preferences Immigration status – National origin – Political beliefs According to the U.S. Census, the population of the nation is changing rapidly, and Florida will soon be one of the most culturally diverse states in the country. Generation Z students populate our classrooms, and these individuals are technology savvy in all aspects of multimedia. Consequentially, we must reexamine our views on diversity to foster a better understanding and a more inclusive learning environment. In understanding the basic elements of diversity, consider the following: How are we alike? What differences do we have? How do we respect and celebrate our differences and similarities? How do we influence our students to gain knowledge of and respect the differences in others? In June, I had the opportunity to attend the FMEA Multicultural Network Summer Workshop (Bernie Hendricks, chairman). Throughout the day, several outstanding individuals presented topics relevant to future professional growth and the further development of inclusive teaching environments. As I observed the sessions, I noted that the participants were music educators from numerous ethnic backgrounds. This diverse group of individuals appeared to be a representive sample of the cultural population of this state. Recently I was invited to give a presentation and to conduct a rehearsal during the Florida A & M University Summer Band Camp (Dr. Shelby Chipman, director). As I was being introduced, I stood in awe of the more than 300 high school student participants who had come from across the nation and realized that this was indeed the most culturally diverse ensemble I had ever seen. In reflection: Why are the above-mentioned learning environments important to our future as music educators? Why are these diverse environments vital to the success of our students and to our goal of music for ALL?

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    Why should we consider creating a more diverse learning environment when we currently have a large number of students in our programs? Why is it important to develop more diversity in all district, state and national performing ensembles? Why is it important to create more diversity in ensemble and course offerings? Why is it important to be more inclusive of our general student population? Why is it important to have representative models of diversity in professional leadership at the district, state and national levels? I do not have the ultimate resolution for this very complex and important issue, but nonetheless we must approach this subject with courage, knowledge and passion as we consider the following: Having an open and honest conversation about diversity (especially race and ethnicity) without fear or condemnation of opinions or values Gaining knowledge through research and creating open discussions with others on race, ethnicity and all other aspects of diversity Creating next steps and DOING SOMETHING in the immediate future to address diversity in music education and in providing music for ALL Seeking to understand and respect the values, attitudes, beliefs and life experiences of others Collectively creating a professional haven for students with diverse backgrounds to coexist together with mutual understanding, acceptance and respect for each other Teaching our students to acknowledge, understand and respect the many ways they are alike and different Identifying and celebrating the uniqueness of our students from a cultural perspective Developing strategies that focus on attracting students from the general population of the school Creating learning environments that are inclusive of ALL students from ALL cultural and social walks of life In the future advancement of diversity in music education, we must: ALL be involved in the conversation ALL be a part of the resolve ALL understand that no individual race or ethnicity should be blamed for the lack of diversity ALL inspire our students to be more HUMANE ALL teach our students to understand, appreciate and celebrate similarities and differences And … perhaps we could ALL try to understand, respect, appreciate, celebrate and LOVE each other just a little more in the future, for the betterment of our students, our profession and the well-being of the world. With respect and humility, John K. Southall, PhD President August 2016 5

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    NOTEables Quarterfinalists Announced for 2017 Music Educator Award™ Presented by the Recording Academy ® and the GRAMMY Foundation ® Each year, one recipient is selected from 10 finalists and recognized for his or her remarkable impact on students’ lives. The fourth annual honoree will be flown to the host city of the GRAMMY Awards ® to be recognized during GRAMMY Week 2017. The recipient will also attend the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards ceremony and a range of GRAMMY Foundation events. The nine additional finalists will receive a $1,000 honorarium, and the schools of all 10 finalists will receive matching grants. Fifteen semifinalists will receive a $500 honorarium with matching school grants. The honorariums and grants provided to the finalists and schools are made possible by the generosity and support of the GRAMMY Foundation’s Education Champions Converse, Disney Performing Arts, Ford Motor Company Fund, and Journeys. In addition, the American Choral Directors Association, the National Association for Music Education, the NAMM Foundation and the National Education Association support this program through outreach to their constituencies. 2017 Music Educator Award Quarterfinalists From Florida: Bobbe Butler Vivian Gonzalez Kervens Jackson Ron Lambert William Molineaux Melton Mustafa Laura Nelson Shing Palagano Christopher Perez Rosa Rabinovich Jeffery Redding Brian Russell Samuel Shingles Joani Slawson Adalberto Yanes Merritt Island High School, Merritt Island South Miami K-8 Center, Miami Piper High School, Sunrise Lakewood Ranch High School, Bradenton Osceola County School for the Arts, Kissimmee Parkway Middle School of the Arts, Lauderhill Orangewood Christian School, Maitland Tenoroc High School, Lakeland Freedom High School, Orlando Norman S. Edelcup Sunny Isles Beach K-8, Sunny Isles Beach West Orange High School, Winter Garden University of Miami, Frost School of Music, Coral Gables Paxton School for Advanced Studies, Jacksonville Saturn Elementary School, Cocoa Doral Academy Preparatory High School, Doral 6 Florida Music Director

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    Please take time to thank and support our 2016 Corporate & Academic Partners. GOLD PARTNERS SILVER PARTNERS University of Central Florida BRONZE PARTNERS Corporate Alfred Music Carl Fischer Music Coco Key Hotel & Water Park J. W. Pepper & Son, Inc. MakeMusic, Inc. Sight Reading Factory The Horn Section, Inc. West Music Company Academic Florida Atlantic University Florida College Florida State University The University of Texas at San Antonio University of Miami Partners as of July 10, 2016. *Please visit FloridaMusicEducation.org for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

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    The Neutral Syllable: Sending a Soundscape of Subliminal Messages by Anthony Bernarducci, PhD Finding the most productive pedagogical approach to introducing a new piece to your choral ensemble can be a difficult decision. The style and difficulty of the piece, sight-reading abilities of the ensemble and even the time available will play a role in determining the best strategy. Ideally we would have time to introduce the concepts that will challenge the ensemble through avenues such as warm-ups and listening exercises; how- ever, there is not always time to complete these supplemental activities. There are three basic options when starting a piece: some begin on text, others strictly on solfège or numbers and finally those on a neutral syllable. Each of the strategies has merit for different educational purposes. When starting a piece, it is important not to confound the learning process by asking the singers to accomplish too many tasks at 8 Florida Music Director

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    beginning stages of the learning process can be beneficial, particularly to a beginning ensemble by giving them a greater chance to follow along as they learn how to read music. Using text can also be an important wrap-up exercise after a rehearsal spent mostly on solfège or neutral syllables, giving singers a realistic taste of what they have accomplished. This article discusses the benefits of using the neutral syllable not only as an introductory tool but more importantly as a way to integrate the musicality called for by a specific piece from the onset of the learning process. The early stage of learning a new piece is often very technical. Staying on this stage for too long can cause ensembles to lose interest because students never see the larger musical picture. After all, the musicality is the reason that the students are in the choir. The neutral syllable has the versatility to simplify the learning process while subliminally setting up musical aspects such as dynamics, tone, color, style and vowels, thereby building in the aural image of the piece from the start. Below is a list of key concepts addressed through use of the neutral syllable. The musical example that follows will offer suggestions on how to practically implement them. Key Concepts to Consider When Choosing a Neutral Syllable 1. Color of the music (bright versus dark) 2. Dynamics and overall character of the music 3. Problematic or recurring vowel that needs reinforcement 4. Articulation and texture of the music 5. Error detection for the conductor and independence for the singers Suggested Use of Selected Vowels and Consonants Vowel Dark/Bright Dynamics Articulations EE (Meet) Bright Mf - F Short or Pointed AH (Hot) Bright Mf - F Expansive OH (Open) Dark P - Mf Legato OO (Food) Dark P - Mf Legato once. Expecting them to sing accurate notes and rhythms all on text from the Consonant Dark/Bright Dynamics Articulations first downbeat is an uphill battle that will only end in frustration for both the N Dark P - Mf Legato conductor and students. Using each of T Bright Mf - F Short or Pointed the three strategies at appropriate times L Dark P - MF Legato enables layering of concepts, leading to mastery. The music literacy benefits to D Bright/Dark Mf - F Legato/Detached using solfège/numbers are obvious and Z Bright Mf - F Marcato often can tremendously speed up the note learning process. Using text at the Continued on page 10 August 2016 9

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    The Neutral Syllable Continued from page 9 You will notice that not all vowel and consonants listed in the charts above types were included. Vowels such as the will promote resonance, focus the energy “Eh” create a diphthong; incorrect use to the front of the mask and support the of this vowel long term could cause further issues if not addressed. Additionally, In musical example Dies Sanctificatus five key concepts previously listed. with the exception of the consonant T, (see next page), many of the five key only voiced consonants were chosen to concepts are present. Throughout this support resonance. Other consonants section, there are possibilities for different vocal colors and articulations, such as G or J were excluded because they would send the sound back while others dynamic contrast, varied characters of such as W, B and R produce an excess individual lines and potential recurring amount of jaw movement. The vowels vowel issues. In measure 30, both tenor 10 Florida Music Director and bass are singing an ostinato pattern; however, the tenor line is marked slightly louder in addition to being more melodic than the bass line. As shown in the score, the suggested syllable for the tenors is “Noh” and for the basses “Noo.” The N for both will create the dark color and legato sound, but the “Oh” vowel for the tenors will increase the dynamic over the bass “Oo” vowel. The “Oh” will also give the tenors a more expansive vowel for the melodic nature of the ostinato pattern.

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